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July Training

July Training

July went by fast.  Does anyone else feel like they say that every month?

For the most part, training went well. I’m slowly increasing mileage and building a base.  There were many days that tested me to get out the door (or on the treadmill) between weather but I only skipped a couple of runs or moved workouts to better days.

Miles Run: About 215
Range of Paces: 6:07-11:30-untimed
Shortest Run: 2 miles
Longest Run: 20 miles
Rest Days: 3
Swimming Days: 7

Races:
Firecracker 5k (20:10)
Allen Stone Run-Swim-Run (41:07)
Run for Toilets 5k Recap

Workouts:

Thoughts:

It feels like the summer is just moving right along.  July brought some fun races, but nothing I was overly proud of.  The Firecracker 5k early in the month would be my fastest 5k.

It was fun to do the Allen Stone Run Swim Run again. While it wasn’t my highest placement, I’m proud of how I raced, and I slowly picked people off. After the first 1k on the beach, I was 55th, then 22nd after the swim, then 10th overall and no one passed me on the 5k run.

One of the highlights of July was doing the “Run for Toilets“, a 5k that benefited the local Elks lodge to fundraise for new bathrooms. I got to break a tape made out of toilet paper!

Run for the toilets onancock breaking tape

I late July, I was able to get my first 20 miler in. Summer has humbled me that running 20 miles is never easy, but it’s even more challenging when it’s above 85 degrees.

I question myself regularly about my marathon and marathon goals. I haven’t run anything that I’m substantially happy with since NYCM last year. That isn’t to say I don’t enjoy running, but training cycles haven’t come together. August will be my highest mileage and peak month of training. I’m looking forward to the challenge.

Posts from the Month:

Hoka Carbon Rocket Shoe Review
New Balance FuelCell Rebel Shoe Review
A Recap of 250 NJ Diners
29 Years Old
Flying to Essex County

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. This week is all about running on the treadmill. 

Questions for you:
How was your month of training?
What has been your best race of 2019?

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Sea Legs Shuffle 10 Miler (1:13.03)

Sea Legs Shuffle 10 Miler (1:13.03)

Last weekend my friend Alexis and I drove up to Connecticut to run the Sea Legs Shuffle 10 miler.  Without traffic, it’s only a 3-hour drive, but there are very few times you drive over the George Washington Bridge without traffic.

Truthfully, I don’t know if I have encountered a trafficless time. We arrived at 4:10 and missed the packet pickup by 10 minutes.

Why Connecticut? It’s summer, and it’s hot, so there aren’t a lot of longer races in the northeast. The half marathon we originally planned in northern PA was sold out, so we decided to go to Connecticut and run the 10 miler instead.

The morning was easy. We made it to the start around 7, grabbed our packets, and warmed up. We both had long runs to do and thought it would be fun to do a long run while getting a hard workout in.

I ran about 5 miles and lined up at the start around 8:05. The race started at 8:10, and it was packed. We didn’t realize it was a Connecticut championship race and extremely competitive. I started in the middle of the pack, which is where I belonged.

The first mile went over a gravel road. There was a lot of dirt being kicked up everywhere. The first mile was flat and easy. I ran a 6:53. The highlight of the race occurred when I saw fast friend, Amanda, whiz by me. We chatted for a second but then she took off.

I was happy with the mile but knew the heat would probably slow me down later. We headed out of the town of Guilford. Throughout the rest of the race, there wasn’t much flat ground. It was either up or down.  It wore on me and it was hard to get any groove.

During the second mile, many people went by me. I felt like that was the theme of the race, and I was regularly passed throughout the race.

Around mile 3, the road was a bit shadier. It was a beautiful view of the water, and it kept my mind off the hills.

As I hit mile 4, I saw the leaders coming back (they were already around mile 5-6). It made me happier because I realized every hill we went up, we would go down (and vice versa).

Just after, we went around a giant loop near the water. The view was stunning. I hit the halfway around 36 minutes. I knew the end goal was 20 miles for the day and ten quality race miles. It wasn’t a PR race and I’m not in PR shape.

The next 5 miles felt like I was counting down each and every mile. I began to realize there was a lack of Generation Ucann on the course. The race advertised electrolyte drink, but there were only two stops. Due to the heat (the feels like temperature was about 90) my body was hot, and I could feel the lack of electrolytes as the race got longer.

me running sea legs shuffle

I hit mile 7 in 7:14, which is about the pace I averaged for the rest of the race. I saw two people stop and drop out of the race. They were ok, but I could tell heat and lack of electrolytes were affecting a lot of people.

Around mile 8, we went over an overpass, and my legs weren’t ready for it. It was tough, but I also knew we were going to go back over it. I just kept focusing on the finish.

At mile 9, I caught another woman, and another person dropped out. It’s the most people I’ve seen drop from a shorter race.

We went over the overpass one last time, and I just focused on the finish. The home stretch went back over the grass, and I crossed in 1:13. I finished the last portion of my 20 miles, and by the time it was done, it was above 90. I’m happy with a quality long run and enjoyable time.

My PR is over a minute per mile faster, but I’m happy with my effort for the course and the day. It was a fun adventure which feels like the theme of my 2019.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. This week is all about running on the treadmill. 

Questions for you:

Have you done a 10-mile race before?

What is your favorite distance to run? 

Big Cottonwood Week 9: Tetris Running

Big Cottonwood Week 9: Tetris Running

Last week was exhausting. Truthfully, I’m surprised I got all of my mileage done because there were a couple of days that it felt like a Tetris game fitting in my distance, but I was able to.  I had to let swimming go for the week for the sake of time and sleep.

Monday: Easy 60 minutes
Tuesday: Easy 60 minutes
Wednesday: Easy 60 minutes
Thursday: 12X400 meters with 400-meter jog (total mileage 10)
Friday: Rest
Saturday: Easy 60 minutes
Sunday: Sea Legs Shuffle 10 Miler 1:13.03 (Total Mileage 20)

Week 1: Hello Humidity
Week 2: Half Marathons and Workouts 57 mpw
Week 3: Travel and More Travel 53 MPW
Week 4: Training: Beach Runs and Long Runs 52 MPW
Week 5: Training: Workouts and 10ks 46.5 MPW
Week 6: Firecracker 5ks 47 MPW
Week 7: Swim Races and Running for Toilets 56 MPW
Week 8: It’s Very Hot 58 MPW
Week 9: Tetris Runner 56 MPW

Thoughts:

This week I didn’t have time to swim. I don’t have any more swimming events coming up, so it made sense to let it go for the week. I want to continue swimming and cross-training but not if it stresses me out. Fitness isn’t supposed to be stressful.  While I was sad I didn’t have the time to swim, sometimes that’s how it goes.

Thursday Workout:

I planned to do the workout on Wednesday, but I woke up exhausted and didn’t have the time to fit it in. So I opted for Thursday when I was better rested as well as had more time. I’m glad I did because the workout went well.

12x400s with 400 jog (on streets). It’s my favorite workout, and today I averaged 6:01 pace with many 400s under 6 min pace. It felt good.

Sunday’s Race: Sea Legs Shuffle 10 Miler (1:13.03)

The goal for the race was to get a total of 20 miles in with ten being productive and quality miles. That’s precisely what I did. It wasn’t easy to double my miles (from a mental and physical standpoint), but I’m glad I was able to have a quality long run. Am I ecstatic about a 1:13 10 mile race? No, but while the race was important, it wasn’t the main goal here. I’m not tapered and increasing mileage. Plus it was a hot, hilly, course.

Post(s) from the Week:

Hoka Carbon Rocket Shoe Review
Stargate Diner (Seaford, De)
Dockside Diner (Long Beach Island)

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. This week is all about running on the treadmill. 

Questions for you:

What is the furthest you’ve run for marathon training?

How was your week of workouts? 

 

Hoka One One Carbon Rocket Shoe Review

Hoka One One Carbon Rocket Shoe Review

I’ve wanted to try the Hoka One One Carbon Rocket for quite some time, but it seems always to be sold out on Hoka’s website.  I guess that’s because Hoka doesn’t make many true racing flats and it’s popular.  Hoka is known as a maximalist shoe brand, so racing flats go against the grain.

Before this year, if you were looking for a racing flat, the Tracer was the best option. I also argue the lightweight Hoka One One Cavu is another excellent racing option for Hoka (it’s my all-time favorite shoe for fast runs). Now Hoka also has the Carbon X, which I recently reviewed as well.

Weight: 7.3 ounces
Heel-to-toe drop: 1mm

Hoka one one carbon rocket

So where does the Carbon Rocket Fall into place? Why is it always sold out?

The Carbon Rocket is a lighter, more responsive version of the Tracer. For many, (including myself), the Tracer is still too much shoe for a short race like the 5-10k.

Hoka one one carbon rocket

Fit:

The mesh upper of the Hoka Carbon Rocket is lightweight and breathable. It’s a relatively simple design which I appreciate. There are minimal seams so it won’t rub on bunions. Theoretically, you could probably wear them without socks, but I choose to wear socks.

The shoe is unisex, and a size 9 (which is about women’s 10.5) fits well.  I am a size 9 in almost any racing flat I use. It’s true to size, something Hoka shoes have done well with.

Hoka one one carbon rocket

Ride:

To make the Carbon Rocket as light and responsive as possible, it uses Hoka’s “ProFly” technology. ProFly is softer in the heel but much firmer in the forefront. The heel is soft for cushion while the forefront is firm for propulsion. There is also a carbon fiber plate sandwiched between to minimize energy loss.

Another thing I appreciate is the rubberized foam outsole on the bottom of the shoe. Many flats this year have gone away from the rubber, but there is plenty of traction.

I’ve done a few different types of runs in the shoes, including runs at slower paces, as well as faster runs and workouts.

For me, I think it fits best as a long/fast run or on workout days. I am still in the process of figuring out my marathon shoe, and right now, this is a contender. With the carbon fiber plate, I do feel fast. If you are using any model of Hoka and want a fast 5k-10k shoe, this is a good option.

One final thing to add is that it does have a 1mm drop. I don’t know of another shoe that does, plenty of 0mm and 2mm drops.

Hoka one one carbon rocket

Conclusion:

The Hoka Carbon Rocket is the best true racing flat out there for shorter distances. If you are running a marathon or above, I think the Hoka One One Carbon X is better. For below a marathon, I would prefer the Carbon Rocket. I believe either is probably suitable for the marathon, along with the Cavu but I’m still in the process of figuring that out. (You’ll be much more injury-prone in the Cavu). I do appreciate this is a much more cushioned shoe and racing flat.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Bondi 6,  Hoka Mach 2,

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProNike Streak Lt,

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races:  Reebok Run fast Pro

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. This week is all about race day nerves! 

Questions for you:

Which shoe do you use for the 5-10k?

What is your favorite racing shoe? 

Big Cottonwood Week 8: It’s Very Hot

Big Cottonwood Week 8: It’s Very Hot

Like many people, I was affected by the heat. I won’t take dangerous risks with running. The feels like temperature was 110 and for me, that isn’t worth running outdoors. The 5k I was fundraising for was canceled, which was disappointing, but I know they made the right choice. I raised over $600, so I cannot be upset about that.

Monday: Easy 60 minutes
Tuesday: AM: Easy 60 minutes
PM: 1-hour swim
Wednesday: 2X2 mile averaging 6:55, total mileage 8
Thursday: Rest
Friday: 10 miles Treadmill averaging -1.5% decline
Saturday: Treadmill 5k: 22:15 -2% decline, total mileage 10.5
Sunday: Treadmill Long Run 17.1 miles 1-2% grade downhill

Week 1: Hello Humidity
Week 2: Half Marathons and Workouts 57 mpw
Week 3: Travel and More Travel 53 MPW
Week 4: Training: Beach Runs and Long Runs 52 MPW
Week 5: Training: Workouts and 10ks 46.5 MPW
Week 6: Firecracker 5ks 47 MPW
Week 7: Swim Races and Running for Toilets

Week 8: It’s Very Hot

Thoughts:

The heat was brutal (for everyone), but I’m proud of how I handled the entire week. I adjusted my paces as needed and opted for quality miles on the treadmill.

Since the Big Cottonwood Marathon is downhill, it makes sense to practice downhill running. When I ran my second marathon, Phoenix, I equated downhill with easy. That marathon didn’t go as well as I hoped and it took me the most time to recover from because my quads were wrecked from 26.2 miles of the same thing. So this weekend I opted for quality downhill miles, and I’m happy with how each run went.

Workout Wednesday: 2X2 mile averaging 6:55 pace  with 1-mile jog in between

This is much slower than I hoped, but it’s been hot. I adjusted and worked hard for the day.  Not else much to say other than it was hot.

The Weekend of Treadmill:

Because it was dangerously hot this weekend, I opted for the treadmill. It didn’t bother me to run inside because it was safer, and I could run quality miles. Big Cottonwood is a downhill marathon, and I haven’t done any downhill running (Southern NJ doesn’t have hills). I used this weekend to set my treadmill on -1-2% and just run. I didn’t think I would be sore, but I am.

Saturday: 5 miles easy, 3.1 miles hard (22:15), 2.4 miles easy (total time 90 minutes)

Since the 5k I was running was canceled due to heat (they made the right call), I ran a 5k alone on the treadmill. I cranked it to -2.0 grade. I felt good, and I’m proud of my effort. Personally, I find the treadmill hard to gauge anything because you set it and go.

Sunday Long Run: 17 Miles with 1-2% downhill

The run was easy and I watched TV the entire time. The point of the run wasn’t to run fast, but to get a long, steady downhill state. Something I cannot get anywhere but the treadmill (around me). I am proud of how the effort went and by about mile 13, my quads were burning. I know it was the right thing to do because I know I’ll have the same feeling during the full.

 

Swimming:

I don’t have any more swimming events planned this year, but I’ve been enjoying the change, and I believe the cross-training has made me stronger.

Posts from the Week:

Allen Stone Run-Swim-Run (41:07)

Run for Toilets 5k Recap

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. This week is all about race day nerves! 

Questions for you:

What is the furthest you’ve run on the treadmill?

Has it been hot where you are? 

 

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