Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 Shoe Review
Gear Review, Running

Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 Shoe Review

Diadora is a newer brand in the running world. Diadora is an Italian brand, with its headquarters in Philadelphia.

Diadora is best known for both lifestyle, tennis, and soccer shoes, but the quality of any Diadora running shoe is every bit as good as other brands.  I’ve reviewed a couple of Diadora shoes, including the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX and Diadora Fly Shoe Review.

Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 Quick Facts:

Weight: 9 oz

Heel to Toe Drop: 10 mm

Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 Fit:

The Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 has a two-tone engineered air mesh upper.  It’s made of nylon and also has transparent transfer.  One thing I appreciate is how the upper of the Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 is made with iridescent details to make it more visible at night. Many of Diadora models now have that feature.

Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 Shoe Review

As a brand, Diadora has a slightly wider last than many other brands. I typically wear between a 10-11 wide. I find the Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 size 10.5 to be great.

Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 Ride:

Diadora is like a giant, soft, marshmallow under your foot. I appreciate all of the cushion and how my foot just sinks in.  Not just with the Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5, but all of the shoes are soft.

Diadora uses “BlueShield technology” in their shoes. Each brand uses a different type of technology they deem the best. For example, Asics uses gel, adidas uses boost, etc.

What is Blushield Technology?

Blushield is soft and durable. Diadora Blushield combines reactivity and cushioning.

The morpho base is carved following the shape of the foot.  This allows the foot to maintain its natural anatomy when rolling through the gait cycle.

Together with the Blushield cushioning and Morpho base, Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 minimizes imbalances in the foot. This is helpful if your feet are doing slightly different things and don’t want to overcorrect one problem. For instance, if one foot pronates.

The sole of the Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 uses “Duratec 5000”.  Duratec 5000 is a durable compound in the heel area that helps with traction and durability.  I’ve found the Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 to be great for miserable weather days. We haven’t had too many icy days this winter, but I appreciate the traction when we do.

I’ve done a few different runs in the Diadora Mythos Blushield Blushield Hip 5 and have found it to be best for easy and recovery days. My favorite days to use it are either recovery run days, easy runs on the treadmill or treadmill days. Much like the Hoka Bondi 6, I appreciate how my foot sinks into the shoe and my body doesn’t feel as banged up.

Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 Conclusion:

I like the Diadora Mythos Blushield Blushield Hip 5 and I find it makes a great recovery shoe, if not one of my favorite of the year. I appreciate how soft and cushioned it is. If you are looking for an easy run shoe, the Diadora Mythos Blushield Blushield Hip 5 is a great option.

Finally, The Diadora Mythos Blushield Hip 5 is exclusively available in run specialty. If you are local, RunningCo. of Haddonfield, Philly Runner, North Wales Running Company, and Runners High carry the Diadora Mythos Mythos Blushield Hip 5.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Mizuno Rider Waveknit 3New Balance 1080 v10, Diadora Mythos Blushield Blushield Hip 5, Hoka Bondi 6, Asics Cumulus 21

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: Brooks Ricochet 2 Shoe ReviewNew Balance FuelCell RebelAltra Escalante 2.0, Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport.

Questions for you:

Have you tried Diadora before?

What is your current favorite shoe? 

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me running
Running, Training, Training Sub 1:25

Sub 1:25 Files: Week 2

week was a great of training. There weren’t any races that interested me, but I was able to log mileage and quality workouts. The running goal until February is log mileage and focus on workouts.  The goal of the 2020 training cycle is to run under 1:25. I don’t know when it will happen and as I gain fitness, I’ll be able to get a better gauge, whether it be sooner or later.  I don’t have a goal race picked out just yet. I need to stay injury free and see how fitness comes along.

Training Log:

Monday: AM: 6 miles
PM: Easy 4 miles with 6X30 second strides
Tuesday: AM: Easy 8 miles PM: 1-hour swim
Wednesday: 20X400s with 200 jog in between
Thursday: Easy 6 miles with Jen
Friday: 14 miles averaging 8:47 pace
Saturday: Easy 6 Group Run
Sunday: 14 miles

Total: 70 miles

Thoughts:

This week went better than anticipated. I felt like I got in recovery and was able to bounce back quickly. I wasn’t expecting to feel as good on Friday, but I ended up feeling good. My easy range ranges anywhere between 9-11 minute miles, so I was surprised to feel so good and average 8:47.  70 miles is the highest amount of miles I’ve run in a couple of years.

Even with marathon training and 20-mile training runs, I wasn’t running 70 because my body needs a heck a lot more rest after 20 miles than 14. I’m looking forward to continuing to build.  I don’t foresee myself getting much higher than 80 but I know I thrive best on 70-80 miles per week. That’s where I’ve run all of my PRs.

Workout Wednesday: 20X400s with 200 jog

I was nervous about this workout. I haven’t done this many 400s in a while. (Probably since 2018). I haven’t done this since X seems to be a theme lately, but it’s also why I haven’t been in PRing shape since X.

Since I’m focusing on longer races (the half marathon), I would prefer to have the endurance versus a few 400s at an all-out sprint. The goal was to run the 400s around a 5-mile pace. Since I chose to do the workout on a hilly road, it was a little slower and averaged 6:46 pace.  While not as fast as I would like, I’m happy with the effort on the hills.

Sunday Long Run: Total Miles 14

Sunday’s long run had a different twist. I ran 7 miles and for the second half, I ran .25 hard followed by .75 easy.  It was tough and I wanted to stop a few too many times but I’m happy with my effort.

long run splits
long run splits

Posts from the Week:

Asics Cumulus 21 Shoe Review

Distance Series 10 Miler (1:10.07)

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

What’s your favorite workout?

Are you training for anything?

Asics Cumulus 21
Gear Review, Running

Asics Cumulus 21 Shoe Review

Asics Cumulus 21 Shoe Review

Asics has been around the running world for years. The Asics Cumulus, the Asics Nimbus, and the Asics Kayano are all over 20 models old. A few years ago, Asics changed factories and their shoe quality went down.  The shoes were narrow and tight and many people went wider and even a full size larger. Shoe size is just shoe size but when you order the same shoe year after year and suddenly you’re a size bigger, it doesn’t do the brand any favors.

My point with that is from about 2015-2019, Asics was not great. In late 2019, they came out with the Asics Nimbus 22 and it was the first shoe in years I was impressed with from Asics.

Asics does win the award of most consistent with their technology.  The same Asics Gel from the 1990s is the same Asics gel now.

Now that we have that long introduction about Asics let’s get to the Asics Cumulus 21, also known as the Asics Gel Cumulus 21. Although there is no non-Asics Gel Cumulus 21 and there is no shoe called the “Asics Gel.”

The Gel Cumulus 21 is a lighter, less cushioned version of the Asics Nimbus 22.

Asics Cumulus 21
Asics Cumulus 21

Asics Cumulus 21 Quick Facts:

Weight: 9.9 ounces

Heel to Toe Drop: 10 mm

Asics Cumulus 21 Fit:

The fit of the Asics Cumulus 21 is what so many people are curious about!  Now, the Asics Cumulus 21 uses a  dual-layer mesh.  The toe box is wider and the Asics Cumulus 21 fits more true to size than it has in years.

First, Asics Cumulus 21 now uses a dual-layer mesh.  While more durable, the engineered jacquard mesh upper doesn’t breathe as well as I hoped.

One thing I wish Asics would remove (from all of their shoes) is the heavy Asics logo. It takes up a lot of space and just seems like unnecessary weight. Many brands have already gone towards screen printing their logos on shoes, so Asics should go that route too. Although the Asics logo doesn’t hinder anything with the fit of the Asics Cumulus 21, it just adds unnecessary weight.

I do appreciate is the higher heel collar in all Asics shoe. The higher internal heel counter and holds the foot in position. My foot feels secure when running in the Asics Cumulus 21.

Asics Cumulus 21
Higher heel counter in the Asics Cumulus 21

In running shoes, I typically wear between a 10-11 wide and I find the Asics Cumulus 11 wide to be the best fit. For a while, I couldn’t comfortably fit into the Asics Cumulus, but I can once again.

Asics Cumulus 21 Ride:

Asics, in general, is one of the heavier brands out there. That’s because Asics uses gel in (most) of their shoes and gel is a heavier substance. While the Asics Cumulus 21 is one of their lighter offerings, it’s still heavier compared to the Saucony Ride, Brooks Ghost, or Hoka Clifton. The Cumulus 21 is no different. The following is some of the features for the midsole and outsole of the Cumulus 21.

Asics Cumulus 21
Asics Cumulus 21 upper

The staple in most Asics shoes is the silicone-based gel, which absorbs shock. Gel is no better than other cushioning systems, but there is more cushion in the heel. The rear and forefoot gel technology is designed for shock absorption with a Flytefoam, low-density foam, in the midsole.

The midsole is made up of both Flytefoam and Flytefoam propel midsole technology. What is Flytefoam? It’s softer, low-density foams that provide bounciness and responsiveness. Asics introduced Flytefoam into many of their staples shoes to reduce weight but also provide a more responsive ride.  With the mixture of foams, I’ve found the Asics Cumulus 21 to provide responsiveness no matter the type of run.

Finally, like many shoes, the Asics Cumulus 21 uses “AHAR,” also known as ASICS High Abrasion Rubber. The rubber makes it great on rainy, wet, or icy days. If it’s icy or snowy, I’m more likely to grab the Asics Cumulus 21.

Asics Cumulus 21
Asics Cumulus 21 outsole

The Flytefoam Propel Technology, together with the rearfoot and forefoot gel technology, makes the Asics Cumulus 21 the softest and most responsive ride in a long time.

I’ve run a few different types of runs in the Asics Cumulus 21 and I find the best use is as a daily trainer or a shoe I’m standing around or at the gym in. I prefer the durable gel for long days at work or to reduce shock on easy runs. Lately, I’ve used the Asics Gel Cumulus 21 a lot for warmups and cooldowns for workouts and races.

Asics Cumulus 21
Asics Cumulus 21

Asics Cumulus 21 Conclusion:

The updated Asics Cumulus 21 is better than it has been in years. It’s exciting to see Asics getting back in the game. The Asics Cumulus 21 fits more comfortably and is a great trainer for someone looking for an everyday shoe for easy runs. It’s one of my favorite shoes to stand around, go to the gym, or even work in (yes, a running shoe that I use a lot for nonrunning). If you’ve run in the Asics Cumulus before, the major changes are the upper and a better fit than previous versions.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Mizuno Rider Waveknit 3New Balance 1080 v10Diadora Mythos Elite TRX, Hoka Bondi 6, Asics Cumulus 21

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: Brooks Ricochet 2 Shoe Review, New Balance FuelCell Rebel, Altra Escalante 2.0, Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

Have you run in the Asics Cumulus 21?

What is your current favorite running shoe? 

InsideTracker Blood Results
Running, Training Sub 1:25

Getting Blood Tested with InsideTracker

If you’ve followed my blog for a while, you might know that I’ve gotten my blood tested with InsideTracker on several occasions. Before starting a new training cycle in 2020, I thought it would be a good idea to test my blood again. I would rather know if I’m deficient in something now, instead of finding out the hard way by feeling fatigued in March and April.

I’ve already discussed how my goal for 2020 is to get back into shape. 2019 was not my year for running, but I want 2020 to be the year I get back into fitness. It wasn’t that I didn’t run in 2019, because I did; but my priorities ended up in different places.

One of the many things I wanted to do to prepare myself for my 2020 season is to get my blood retested with InsideTracker. The last time I got my blood tested was over a year ago. I had all of the plans to train and run hard in 2019, but that never happened. I still ran to stay healthy, but I didn’t run to be my best. It’s funny, because I did run many halves and a full marathon, but I was minutes off of any PR. You can’t go hard every year, and that’s something I’ve tried to remind myself.

InsideTracker Blood Results

Anyway, as I prepare for training in 2020, I don’t want to leave stones unturned. My body isn’t the same was it was in 2018 or 2019, and so I decided to get tested again.  I wanted to have a baseline to see what I can work to improve.

Sharing your blood results can feel really personal. Like “OMG, I have low iron, am I a failure?” And if there’s one thing I’ve learned about blogging about food choices, it’s that diet is one of the most polarizing topics out there (second maybe to politics). I’m committed to sharing my entire process this year. I’ll talk about how I plan to build back fitness and hopefully feel better running.

What is my running goal?

My running goal for 2020 is to rerun a 1:25 half marathon (that’s 6:29 per mile). That isn’t a PR, but it is a realistic goal. Last weekend I ran a 10-mile race and averaged 6:58 per mile, it’ll take some work, but I know I can get there because I’ve been there before.

How do I plan to get there?

  1. Get a Current Running Baseline (Hair of the Dog 10k 41:49, 6:40 per mile; and Distance Series 10 Miler, 1:10.07)
  2. Get a Blood Levels Baseline (that’s in this post!)
  3. Train and Fuel Accordingly

It seems simple, and it is, but as we all know, simple doesn’t always equal easy. I’m not putting a time limit on it. Maybe it will happen in the spring, or perhaps in the fall.

What is InsideTracker?

In case you’ve never heard of InsideTracker, here’s a quick overview. They test your blood for 40 biomarkers. From the test results, their science team makes personalized nutrition and lifestyle recommendations.

InsideTracker is not a substitute for going to your doctor and getting regular health checkups, and they clearly state that they are not giving medical advice. InsideTracker makes recommendations based on your blood that will help you recover faster and healthier. Maybe you feel tired and running feels like a chore. You could be overtrained, or maybe you have low iron. Getting your blood drawn takes the guesswork out of “why do I feel like garbage.”

InsideTracker categorizes those 30 biomarkers into “optimized, needs help, and at-risk.” The optimal zone is exactly what it sounds like: normal and healthy. The needs help category is for areas that are a bit lower than they should be. Finally, the at-risk category means that there is something wrong and if you correct it, you’ll probably feel better. When a biomarker falls in the at-risk category and you need to be seen by a doctor, InsideTracker makes it very clear, and they can even send blood test results directly to your doctor.

InsideTracker Has All of the Following and More:

  • A customized dashboard for you
  • Customized Suggestions on your Blood Results
  • Physician-ordered tests only give you numbers

Why InsideTracker? 

If you’re a runner, and you want to get your blood checked, but it’s not a life or death problem, I find it is easier than going through a doctor. With Tricare and military insurance, I am very fortunate that my insurance covers a lot of things.

If I had a medical emergency, my insurance would cover getting my blood tested and checked. I do not have any ongoing medical conditions and my everyday life is fine. I want to know my blood levels so I can tailor my routine to be the best I can with running. I want to make sure my blood is optimized for training and that I’m not missing key vitamins that my body needs. That’s why I chose InsideTracker. InsideTracker is designed for many people, including athletes, to check their levels.

Usually, I choose to get my blood drawn at my house with the mobile service. It costs a little extra, but getting blood drawn is not my favorite thing. In fact, I have passed out giving blood or from needles more often than not.

However, this time around the mobile service wasn’t an option, so on a good day for our schedules, my husband drove me into Philadelphia. (I didn’t want to drive myself, only to pass out at the office). Thankfully, it was fine. It feels silly typing out my fear of needles as an almost 30-year-old woman. I’ve given myself panic attacks getting blood drawn, so it’s not an easy deal for me.

The woman at Quest Diagnostics was great and I was in and out.

My InsideTracker test results:

I have several biomarkers that fall in the need help category:

My cortisol has lowered but still not Ideal:

My cortisol being lower came as a surprise for me. Running-wise, my body hasn’t been stressed, but the rest of life has been stressful. I was shocked that I’m finally trending in the right direction.

Inside Tracker Results
InsideTracker Results Cortisol

My creatine kinase is high:

Creatine kinase is essentially the amount of damage your muscles have. The more fatigued the muscles are, the higher it is. While mine isn’t dangerously high, it is higher than we would like.

Inside Tracker Results
InsideTracker Results Creatine Kinase

My vitamin B12 is too high:

I do eat a lot of red meat, so that makes sense. I don’t drink energy drinks or sodas anymore (the only soda I like these days is Dr. Pepper on road trips). The recommendation here is that I eat less red meat. Luckily for me, many diners now serve Beyond Burgers… we’ll see.

My “inflammation group is too high”:

This could be several things, including getting tested two days after a hard 10k. One major component of my fitness plan for 2020 is to get more sleep. I already strive to get 7-8 hours of sleep, but truthfully I’m someone who needs more sleep.

Inside Tracker Results
InsideTracker Results Inflammation Group (the grey indicates wasn’t tested last time)

My iron is low:

Until my mid to late 20s, my iron was always borderline high. The first time I was tested, I was skeptical that maybe it was a fluke, but being tested twice in a row with lower iron means that I do need to work towards getting more iron. I will start taking an iron supplement once a day.

Inside Tracker Results
Iron InsideTracker Results

Both my calcium and vitamin D levels are normal:

YAY! As someone who had too many broken bones in my early 20s (mostly from overtraining), I am happy to hear my vitamin D and calcium are at normal levels. I’ve worked hard to get more calcium and Vitamin D, and I’m glad to see that it worked.

Inside Tracker Results
Calcium InsideTracker Results

The Plan:

Now that I have this valuable data about my blood, I can adjust my diet as necessary. I don’t plan to follow a strict diet or completely avoid certain foods. Running is lifelong and restricting anything isn’t going to do anyone any favors. There are a few foods I can add to help to increase my recovery, decrease creatine kinase, and lower cortisol.

  • Beans: I don’t eat a lot of beans. I don’t know why, but when I’m hungry, I don’t think about eating beans. So I’m planning to add a cup of beans on most days.
  • Wheat germ: Wheat germ keeps coming up as something that helps lower inflammation groups and improve overall health. I didn’t know anything about it until InsideTracker, so I’m looking forward to seeing how my body responds to it.
  • Iron supplement: I do believe most things can be gotten from food, but it can be difficult to boost low iron effectively, so I prefer to also supplement with iron.
  • Less red meat: I don’t plan to go vegetarian or vegan, but I also don’t plan to have steak every meal.
  • Sleep: Sorry, don’t talk to me after 8 pm.

In all, I’m happy I got my blood tested with InsideTracker. I’m looking forward to 2020 and putting effort into running again.  I’m looking forward to seeing how my body responds in the next 3 months.

If you are interested in InsideTracker, you can learn more here.

Questions for you:

Have you gotten your blood tested? Have you used InsideTracker?

me running
Running, Training Sub 1:25

1:25 Training Files: Windy Workouts and 10 Milers

As I start training again, I’ve decided to call my next training block: “The Sub 1:25 files”. It has a nice ring, right?

As I mentioned on my 2019 training log, my 2020 running goal is to get back into 1:25 half marathon shape. While this isn’t a PR, it’s a realistic goal for me (since I haven’t done that in nearly two years).

I’m not putting a time limit on whether it happens in the Spring or Fall.

Monday: Easy 8 miles
Tuesday: Easy 6 miles
Wednesday: Workout (total miles 12)
Thursday: Rest+ Travel to VA
Friday: Easy 8 miles with 10X20 second strides
Saturday: Tidewater Distance Series 10 mile race (1:10.07) Total miles 14
Sunday Easy 8 miles

Thoughts:

This week went well. I decided to drive down and visit my parents for the weekend in Virginia.  While I got to see them over the Holidays, I wanted a few more days. Typically January NJ weather is gloomy and dark.  This year has been extremely mild so far. I plan to run a few 10-mile races this year and last weekend could be the hottest one!

Wednesday: 3 miles at 10-mile pace (6:58) followed by 8X1 min hard/ 1 min rest

My workout on Wednesday was different than what I’ve done before.  One of the main goals of my 2020 season is to do different things.  Doing the same workouts, in the same comfort zone, doesn’t help you get faster, so this seemed fun.

The day itself was windy.  Funny enough a few days later, I ran 10 miles averaging 6:58 pace.  Both were challenging running days but in different ways. After that, I finished with 8X1 min easy/hard, which was mentally and physically challenging. I’m proud of myself for getting it done. Plus, I found $2 on the second portion.

Distance Series 10 Miler: 1:10.07

My “A goal” was to run under 1:10.  I wasn’t expecting the humidity to be so high.  I can’t remember another time I’ve run a 65-70 degree race in January. I didn’t run in as straight of a line as I could have which ultimately led me to running slightly longer than the 10 miles. Normally I wouldn’t care, but it was the matter of being under 1:10 or not being under 1:10.

distance series mile splits
distance series mile splits

Anyway, I ran the race consistently and all of my miles were between 6:55-7:01.  I’m happy with my effort for the day.

Next Week:

I don’t have any races on the calendar for a few weeks, so I’ll just be working hard and doing more workouts.  The goal for the next 2 weeks is to build fitness.

Posts from the Week:

Brooks Ricochet 2 Shoe Review 

Salomon S-Lab Sense Ultra 8L Hydration Vest Review

Hiking Pocahontas State Park

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

What is your 2020 goal?

How is your training going?