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The Difference Between Runners and Non-Runners

The Difference Between Runners and Non-Runners

It may be hard to remember, but there are people in the world that don’t run!  It’s a weird concept, but it exists.

The life of runners and non-runners is drastically different. I can remember a time I didn’t run and can relate to all of these. Non-runners are cool people too, you know!

Crawlin crab half marathon hampton va me running

How Do Runners and Non-Runners Compare?

Budget:

Non-runners: Non-runners save money for a lot of different things: happy hour, the newest technology or even a great wardrobe. Look at those ultra-chic sunglasses…glamorous.  Whatever it is, they put away money to do the enjoyable “fun things.”

Runners: We save money for new shoes, new workout clothes, and of course races. Don’t forget saving for the latest GPS watch. The smaller the watch, the more money it is. Without these things, we can’t do what we love! Right?  Who runs without a GPS Watch? Barbarians, that’s who!  When we show up to brunch in an old ratty pair of running leggings…you know why!

Beauty Routine:

Non-runners: Non-runners know how to make their features look great. They might spend an hour preparing for the day and look flawless every single day. They have time to hit every last detail, all while looking through the best wrinkle cream reviews to boot. Each outfit is perfect.  Every makeup application is perfect.
Runners: Runners have mastered the ability to shower and put on makeup within 10 minutes. Did that runner just workout on the treadmill or are those fashionable leggings? The lines are blurred, and the world may never know…Good thing fashion has evolved into a lot more comfort.

Eating on the Go and Snacking:

Non-Runners: Non-runners can go hours without eating. Forget to pack a snack? That’s fine, they just hit up the vending machine and are ready to go. 
 Life doesn’t revolve around snacking and being rungry all of the time. If a meeting goes late, oh well!

Runners: Our non-running friends know us as the vending machine to go. We have more snacks in our bags than a vending machine. Are you craving an apple or a chocolate bar? We have both. Runners are never without snacks because you never know when the stomach will start talking. When Runger hits, you have approximately 5 minutes to get us to the nearest food supply, or you will see rage that you have never seen before.

Week Days:

Non-Runners: Sleep until appropriate, wake up, get ready for work, and arrive to work on time. Spend work time doing work, get lunch, or relax, and eat packed lunch. Leave at the appropriate time, do an hour of exercise, or whatever, come home. Eat dinner, relax and go to bed.

Runners: Wake up at 4 am to get a run in. Shower, get ready for work, drink coffee in the shower, and get to work on time. When lunch hits, either tank a “runch” or running lunch,” or just gobble down lunch at the desk. Do more work, go home, get a second run in, or if you’re starving, eat, relax and go to bed.

Weekends:

Non-Runners: After the work week is over, non-runners often catch up with friends by going out for happy hour or dinner. They have a few drinks, dance and let loose. Most of Saturday and Sunday is spent relaxing and catching up on other hobbies.

Runners: Runners look forward to the weekend too! It’s either race weekend or long run weekend! Either way, we are waking up earlier than a weekday. We spend Friday night cuddled up in PJs, watching a movie and in bed sleeping before 9.

Weekend Brunches:

Non-Runners: Non-runners wake up anywhere between 8 and noon. After a well-rested sleep, they meet friends at a neighborhood breakfast spot. It doesn’t matter if it’s crowded because nonrunners are just waking up and going out to eat. They aren’t starving yet. Of course, our non-running friends look gorgeous and spent a few extra minutes getting ready for brunch. Heck, they might even fill up on mimosas beforehand! No wonder they are so happy waiting hours for a table!

Runners: On the weekend, runners wake up well before the weekday. We get our long runs in, and before we know it, it’s time to eat, and we are just trying to make it there on time. There is nothing more cringe-worthy than waiting for brunch after a long run. A messy bun, somewhat fashionable workout clothing and an old pair of sneakers are our signature brunch look.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Question for you: What is something you do that your “non-running” friends might not understand?

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How to be an Instagram Runner

How to be an Instagram Runner
Step One: You have an Instagram.
Step Two (maybe?): You run.

In that order

In the last few years, social media has taken off. Before instagram, there was blogging and before blogging there was myspace and xanga. Who logged a workout on those?

Now social media is here to stay because who doesn’t want to take photos of themselves and promote their running. If there is anything I’ve learned, people love to talk about themselves (myself included).

So Now You’ve Thought: “Being an Instagram Runner is for me”…

how to be an instagram runner

Here are a Few Easy Techniques to Become an InstaRunner:

Step One: Create a (FREE) Instagram:

You need Instagram to be an Instagram runner. Contrary to popular belief, you don’t actually need to run. (Fake it until you make it!) You just need an Instagram.

Step Two: Run (Maybe):

Here is the thing about being an Instagram runner. You don’t actually have to run; you just need to say you did! I always advise honesty but don’t feel pressured to run just because you are an Instagram runner now.

A Few Posts You Should Include on your Feed:

The Watch Pose:

Stand with your watch on your wrist with your workout done. Snap photo to maybe include shoes. Decorate your wrist with pieces of jewelry to enhance the wrist. Bracelets, charms, whatever. Just add your own artistic flair.

Tips:

  • Try to find pretty grass to stand on. The bathroom or dirty floor is not desirable.
  • Clean your watch face.  It’s your watches time to shine!
  • If your workout did not go as planned and you would like to look faster, just end early. Want to look like you ran 13.1 miles in 62 minutes, just end early and log the 62 minutes. You could even write (in paintshop) 13.1 on your watch for better authenticity.

The Run Shot:

This can be the hardest to master so don’t get discouraged. Some instarunners actually have professional photographers to follow them around every workout! Talk about glamorous.

Tips:

  • Buy a high-end camera. You have to pay to play! $800+!
  • Don’t choose a rainy day, that makes photos blurry.
  • Jog in place. That way you can get higher quality photos.
  • If you don’t have at least 1 fight with your significant other about taking the shot, you are doing it wrong!
  • Use video mode and just grab a shot that way.

The Motivational Shot:

Now, this is usually a recycled photo and that’s okay. Got a favorite picture of yourself from the 1980s with a big perm?  Perfect. The point of this photo is not the photo; it’s the caption.

Tips:

  • You should have a minimum caption length of 400 words. This is generally what is accepted to be “motivational.”
  • It should provide some sort of motivation. Hard to get out the door that day? Struggle from lack of sleep? Pants just don’t fit right? Struggle to balance everything? Those are just some starters, but any old motivation will do. Remember, you are your biggest fan.

Post-Run Selfie:

This can get confusing because you don’t need to run, just post a selfie saying you did.

Tips:

  • Make sure to download a photo app that allows you to make your skin as smooth as porcelain. Runners don’t sweat or have any lumps and bumps.
  • Just selfie. Work your best angle from myspace angle to straight forward. Do you have a signature pose? Mine’s winking!

The Runner Flatlay:

Once you’ve found a few brands you like, this is your time to make them shine.  Before a race take a photo of every piece of gear you plan to wear (don’t forget underwear!).  Arrange neatly so your fans can see your plan. They might want to track or recognize you on the course (thank your new found celebrity runner status!).

Tips:

  • Include everything, even things you might think you would want but will never use. It’s better to be safe than sorry in this shot.
  • Make sure to find a beautiful backdrop. Don’t use the bathroom. Perhaps go to a fancy hotel with a 50,000 dollar rug. The hotel bought that rug for you to take the shot on!

These are just the basics to help you become what you’ve always dreamed, an Instagram runner!

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Question for you: What other Instagram runner techniques do you use?

 

 

How to Bounce Back from a Bad Race

How to Bounce Back from a Bad Race

The week before last I had a bad race at the Phillies 5k. While yes, you can argue it was windy, my disappointing race wasn’t because of that.  Honestly, it wasn’t my day and these things happen.  While it stinks, I race so frequently there is no point to let one bad race ruin my day.

How to Bounce Back from a Bad Race

So What Can You Do After a Bad Race?

Like the movie, Frozen, let it go…

Find the Positives:

When I finished the Phillies 5k, the first thing I thought was: Wow I felt awful. Then I quickly remembered I’m injury free.  The entire race was miserable, my mental spot was not great, but I finished healthy.

After cooling down, I caught up with one of my closest friends and still hung out. I saw many locals and chatted for a while. They asked how the race went, and I said: “awful it wasn’t my day for running, but it’s just running”.

Running isn’t my job; it’s a hobby.  If a hobby stresses you out or causes you misery, it’s time to find a new one. Sure, I won’t always “love running” but instead of dwelling on a bad race, look for the good.

It’s important to look at the positives of your race:

Did you finish healthy and injury free?  Could you smile afterward and have a good day?

Next, Reflect and Figure out Why:

Immediately after the 5k, I chalked it up to being “a bad race”.

Now that I’ve sat back and reflected, I know there are plenty of reasons the 5k was not a great race for me.

My body was still tired from the weekend prior. I haven’t eaten or slept well, and I’ve increased speed and racing. Plus, I ran a half marathon the weekend prior. I’ve done it a dozen times, but I’ve always been more fit.

None are excuses but they all contribute to why my race didn’t go well.  Reflecting back and having a few answers is better than, “it just didn’t.”

It gives you ways and reasons to improve.  You can make adjustments to your training, nutrition, or sleep patterns.

Most Importantly: Recover and Set New Goals:

After running a bad race, it’s important to take time to recover.  Even though the race didn’t go well, don’t go crazy. Take time to recover and relax.  Then set your sights on a new race or goal.

Maybe a marathon burned you out…

Or maybe you want to run longer races…

Find something to get excited and refocused about! 

For me personally, I have many races over the next two months. While I’m not looking for magical redemption, I’m looking forward to chipping away my time and getting back into better fitness.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

How do you get over a bad race?

What has been your least enjoyable race?

Shamrock Half Marathon (1:29.52)

Shamrock Half Marathon (1:29.52)

This was my 8th year running Shamrock. Many long term readers know but I grew up in the greater VA Beach area. 1:29.52 is neither my fastest nor my slowest Shamrock. It’s on the slower side, but that’s okay.

Last year I had an incredible experience that would be hard to beat and ran a 1:23. This year the goal was just to finish healthy. My training over the winter was nothing to write home about, and I’ve come to terms that this Spring might be a rebuilding season for me (something I personally seem to need after every marathon?).

Anyway, I arrived at the start around 6 am. The weather was ideal. It was low 40s, some wind but not much. Most importantly, it wasn’t raining. Two years ago,it poured rain and was low 30s.

Before the race, I met up with my good friend Jen. We haven’t seen each other since we both lived in NYS. We’ve both since moved, but it was nice to catch up. She ultimately ran a 1:18 and placed 3rd.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

After that, I tooled around and got to the start about 5 minutes early. I talked with rabbit teammate, Nick, and by the time I knew it, we were off.

Since the half and full start together now, it was crowded. Right off the bat, I felt decent. Plus unlike the day prior, I remembered to start my watch. I plugged along and cruised the first mile in 6:44. I felt good and realized a sub 90 minute half was doable if I continued to feel okay through the race — a great goal to make a mile 1.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

At mile 2, I saw my dad’s friend and waved. I started getting into a rhythm.  The next three miles were relatively boring. I logged 6:44, 6:44, 6:40 (mile 4 on the gradual uphill was my fastest), 6:44. At mile 5, I was feeling good. I thought wow, this is much faster than I anticipated (I didn’t have a goal prerace, but didn’t anticipate being that fast either).

Then we entered Fort Story, and it all changed. Fort Story is a lonely part of the race. Unless you have a military ID, spectators can’t get on the base. It’s right along the water so extremely windy. In fact, one year there was a layer of sand across the entire course.

Miles 7-9 broke me both mentally and physically. I didn’t feel good, and I was running alone. There was some wind but nothing terrible. It wasn’t that I didn’t feel good because I had raced the day before, I just mentally felt disconnected and my legs felt stale. I told myself, make it to mile 10, and you’ll be heading directly home. I ran a 6:55, 6:59, 6:50, and kept it barely under 7 minutes.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

I knew the 90-minute pace group was probably catching me soon.  Around mile 10, a man started talking to me about “my form”.  I wasn’t feeling the greatest and not in the mood to chat. We kept plugging along.

Mile 11 went down with nothing major. I ran a 6:55 and we had some wind at our backs. At mile 12, the 90-minute/3 hour marathon pace group engulfed me. I thought, wow I really did slow down. I also felt my shoe beginning to come untied, and it just felt like the wheels had come off.

The group engulfed and went around me and it stung. I hit mile 12 just over 1:22 and I knew I was still at 1:30 pace. Now I was just much closer than the start of the race. It made me feel a little better the group was ahead of their goal pace.

The last mile goes to directly into the wind. When you’re close to a time goal, running into the wind the last mile is the last thing you want to do.  You can see the tent and King Neptune and it just never feels like it’s getting closer.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

Then at mile 13, I saw it click 1:29:10.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

I tried to sprint as hard as I could to the finish. I didn’t have much gas left but it was enough to get right under 1:30.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

Thoughts:

I’m pleased with the race but know I have a long way to go fitness wise. In all, another good Shamrock. It’s one of my favorite races of the year and I always enjoy seeing local friends as well as others that come from far.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach

Chilling on the beach with Nick

Questions for you:

Have you run a race for several years in a row?

What is your favorite race? 

 

Adrenaline 5k (19:26)

On Saturday I ran the Adrenaline Run 5k. The Adrenaline Run is one of the most competitive 5ks in the greater Philadelphia/New Jersey area. It sells out every year and the typically the first 150 finishers all run under 20 minutes. This year I ran 19:26 and was around 130th place.

I’m biased by RunningCo. Always does a great job putting the race together and it’s always a lot of fun. Anyway, after an exhausting and busy week, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I knew I wouldn’t be running 18:29 like last year, but I was hoping to be faster than the last 5k I ran.

I warmed up a few miles and got to the start line around 10 minutes early. Since I knew quite a few people there, (I would think about 1/3rd), I talked and caught up with several people. Before I knew it, we were off.

The start is jam-packed. Since I knew I would be nowhere near the front, I didn’t line up in the front. As we began running, I realized around .5 I had forgotten to start my watch. In a 5k, I thought it seemed silly to start it then, so I just didn’t. I’ve run races with GPS before, and while it’s nice to know your splits, your legs still move without a watch. I could have run 22 minutes or 18 minutes, and I would have had no clue.

The first mile was crowded. It was hard to get any rhythm. We ran straight into a headwind. It was one of the windier days and so we were just running into a headwind down Kings Highway. I saw my co-workers and friends in front of the store which is always motivating.

We rounded the corner near Saxbys and went straight into the neighborhoods. It’s a long flat, windy stretch. If it wasn’t windy, it’s easy to build speed there.

Just after mile 1, we turned the corner, went down a small downhill and hit the water stop. It was nice not to be in the wind anymore. We went up a few inclines. My husband, who hasn’t been running much, passed me around mile 2. I was happy for him and just focused on the last mile.

The last mile went straight back Kings Highway and headed towards the finish. It’s flat and fast, and this year with the tailwind it was even faster. (A perk of the headwind going out). If I were to guess, my bet is my last mile was somewhere around 6:0X because of the tailwind. With the long stretch, you can see the finish line for over a half mile away.

me running adrenaline run

I saw the clock go over 19 and I knew somewhere where I was speed wise. I had no clue until that point. I powered as much as I could and crossed in 19:26. I’m happy with my effort for where I am, fitness wise. It’s always tough not to compare yourself to a faster year, but it’s my fastest 5k in several months so I can’t complain about that.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

What is your favorite 5k?

Have you ever raced without a watch? I’ve done many. At my first marathon, NYCM, my watch stopped working at the start (and it never worked again).

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