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NYCM Training Log: Recovery and Hiking

NYCM Training Log: Recovery and Hiking

Tis the season before the New York City Marathon and wow, where has time gone?

When New Balance offered me a chance to run 5 weeks ago, it felt like I had “plenty of time”. Time is up and I’m back to resting, recovering, and tapering.

Last week was more of a recovery week from the Atlantic City Half Marathon and 20 miler. I feel confident I’ll be able to finish the New York City Marathon, but my goals have shifted.

Monday: Hike with Shawn
Tuesday: Rest
Wednesday: 10 miles averaging 7:52 pace
Thursday: Rest
Friday: Easy 60 minutes
Saturday: Pennypacker XC Open: 21:00
Sunday: 15 Miles

Thoughts:

I didn’t mean to take 3 days off from running (originally I planned 2), but my body was tired and I have no regrets. My good friend and coworker went for a beautiful hike (and one of my favorite in NJ). The Stairway to Heaven is a tough hike but worth the view. It was by no means a rest day though.

Pennypacker Cross Country Open 5k:

I’ve wanted to do the Pennypacker Cross Country Open 5k for a while. This year the only way to make it work was to run beforehand and a fast finish 5k as the last 3.1 miles (for a total of 10.1 miles). I haven’t run cross country in a while, and it was a lot of fun. The Pennypacker Cross Country Course is used a lot of local high schools. I’m happy with my effort at the of a longer run, plus on cross country terrain.

Sundays Long Run:

On Sunday, I ran 15 and it was one of the hardest runs I’ve done in a while. The rain and wind, made it difficult and obviously my body didn’t feel great after the race the day beforehand. I am happy to get it done, although my confidence could use a boost.

Next Week:

As I go into New York Marathon weekend, I plan to taper down. My goal for the marathon is to start and finish healthy. Right now, I would be ecstatic with anything under 3:30, but I’m not putting a time goal out there. As I said last week, I do believe this will be my last marathon for a while and it will be nice to start and finish the race healthy.

Posts from the Week:

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

Atlantic City Half Marathon (1:36.27)

Hiking Pakim Pond in Brendan T. Byrne State Park

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport.

Questions for you:

How was your week of running? 

Are you running New York City Marathon? 

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September Training: Injury and New Races

September Training: Injury and New Races

Like most of the month, this isn’t the training log I expected to write. I was hoping to write about how I conquered the Big Cottonwood Half Marathon. Sadly, that never happened.  While I’m sad, I don’t regret anything.

Miles Run: About 100
Rest days: 2 Full Weeks+2 during training
Range of Pace: 6:30-11:30-untimed
Races: 1812 Challenge (2:09.40/7:09 pace)
Cross Training: Swimming 5 times, Hiking 2X

Thoughts:

September went through a range of emotions for me.

Sad:

  • When I realized my injury was too deep to run my goal marathon: Big Cottonwood.
  • When I needed an MRI and I thought there was a possibility to something broken in the pelvis.

Mad:

  • Why did this happen less than 10 days before my marathon?
  • When 10 days of complete rest went by and nothing seemed to get better.

Relief:

  • When slowly I started feeling better
  • When my MRI showed I have no signs of stress reactions or stress fractures.

Happiness:

  • Winning the 18.12 Challenge, something I didn’t think was possible!
  • When my body slowly started to feel better.
  • When New Balance asked if I would like to run the New York City Marathon with Team New Balance.
  • Hiking. I just enjoy being out there.

Now that I’m going to do a mini buildup, towards New York, I have a new goal. My goal for New York is to start and finish healthy. I’m not going to force myself to run a lot of mileage. Ramping anything too quickly will result in another injury. I’ve told a few people but it’s hard to have a miserable time at New York City if you’re healthy.

As far as my hamstring goes, it never hurts when walking or living life. It only hurt with running. Early in the month, it hurt with any runner. Now, it doesn’t hurt with easy running, but I have yet to test it out with anything “fast”. I did a few strides a few days ago and while it felt tight, it didn’t feel bad.

I’m looking forward to seeing how it responds in a race setting.

My plan for October is just to slowly increase miles, get a few quality sessions and then run New York. I will be doing a few races to test out my hamstring as well. I don’t need any surprises at the marathon.

Posts from the Week:

Running Books
Aftershokz Aeropex Headphone Review
Vital Proteins RecoveryWave
Aftershokz Xtrainerz Headphone Review

Shoe Reviews:
New Balance Fuelcell 5280 Shoe Review
New Balance 880v9 Shoe Review
Nike ZoomX Vaporfly Next%
Nike Zoom Fly 3 Shoe Review

Hiking:
Hiking Sunrise Mountain at State Forest
Hiking Wissahickon Creek Gorge Loop Trail
Hiking Splitrock Reservoir

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:
Have you run NYCM?
How was your month of training? 

New Balance Fuelcell 5280 Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell 5280 Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell 5280 Shoe Review:

Quick Facts:
Weight: 5.2 oz

New Balance Fuelcell 5280 Shoe Review

Many brands are coming out with the full carbon length shoe. The New Balance Fuelcell 5280 is the short distance answer from New Balance. It’s not meant for 10ks, half-marathons, and marathons. It’s intended for a short race. At the 5th Avenue Mile, was when people took note of the New Balance Fuelcell 5280. Most, if not all, New Balance sponsored athletes were wearing the New Balance Fuelcell 5820. Jenny Simpson won wearing the shoe.

So why 5280? There are 5280 feet in a road mile.

New Balance Fuelcell 5280 Shoe Review

The New Balance Fuellcell 5280 Upper:

Many New Balance models are now using a brand new mesh upper, similar to the Nike Flyknit material. It’s a close knit, breathable material. It fits tight and the laces are short.

One thing I don’t love about the New Balance Fuelcell 5280 is how difficult it is to put the New Balance Fuelcell 5280 on. Any racing flat is challenging to put on, but with one seem, the New Balance Fuelcell 5280 is challenging. While trying it on for the first time, I was worried I would rip the shoe. That being said, once they are on, they fit well. I typically wear between a size 10-11 wide. The men’s size 9 (women’s 10.5) of the New Balance 5280 fits well.

New Balance Fuelcell 5280 Shoe Review

The New Balance Fuelcell 5280 Ride:

The New Balance Fuelcell 5280 is best for short races. I haven’t run any road miles, but I have raced a few 5ks and felt fast every time. With the carbon fiber plate, the 5280 propels forward. It feels like a true racing flat or even track spike with a carbon plate. Now if only it was durable enough for longer than a 5k.

New Balance Fuelcell 5280 Shoe Review

There are a few things with the New Balance Fuelcell 5280:

With the design of the underfoot, you land more on your toes. It feels more like a spike, designed to put you on your toes. If this isn’t how you run, you will be sore.  You will heavily stress your metatarsals so it’s important to work into the shoe. The traction and bottom of the New Balance Fuelcell 5280 is distinct. It has rubber, raised triangles like a spike.

With the carbon plate, the New Balance Fuelcell 5280 also uses the fuelcell technology (like the Fuel Cell rebel).

Now on to the actual ride of the New Balance Fuelcell 5280. What makes it great? The New Balance Fuelcell 5280 is pure minimalist. The Fuelcell propels With the Hoka Carbon Rocket is designed for ultras, the Nike Vaporfly designed for marathons, the New Balance Fuelcell 5280 is a fast, minimalist shoe.

Run for the toilets onancock breaking tape

New Balance Fuelcell 5280 Conclusion:

The New Balance Fuelcell 5280 has become my favorite short-distance running shoes. I’m hoping more brands will make a fast carbon fiber plate shoe designed for shorter races like the 5k or even half marathon.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Bondi 6,  Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280, Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

What is your favorite racing shoe?

What is your current favorite shoe? 

Nike ZoomX Vaporfly Next%

Truthfully, I think it’s dumb to post a review about the Nike ZoomX Vaporfly Next% (or just Nike Vaporfly Next%). Before reading anything, you’ve already made up your mind if you are going to buy the Nike Vaporfly Next%. Most brands are coming up with some form of carbon fiber plate shoe, Nike just did so first. There is plenty of research to shoe the Nike Vaporfly Next% does make you run faster, but you also have to put in the work.

It’s no secret there have been plenty of world records run and races like the London Marathon won and Eliud Kipchoge has run the fastest marathon time. The Next Vaporfly Next% is a race day shoe. I would do some training in the running shoes, but save most of the shoe for racing. That way you get the most out of your money because the Nike Vaporfly Next% is not durable.

Anyway, since Nike ZoomX Vaporfly Next% is a lot to type out, I’ll just say the Nike Next%. You get it.  I do believe the second version of the Nike Vaporfly has gotten a good update, and I wouldn’t be as worried about sliding down the streets on a poor weather day.

Nike Vaporfly Next% Fit:

Like the Nike Zoom Fly 3, the Nike Next% now uses Vaporweave. According to Nike, the Vaporweave absorbs 93% less water. This isn’t limited to rain but also includes sweat. A common complaint was the flyknit upper absorbed the moisture and made your feet feel sloppy (which is true).

The Vaporweave upper material is transparent and also lighter than the Flyknit and mixes two plastics: TPU and TPE.  So be sure to wear cool socks, because you’ll see them.

Outside of the Vaporweave material, the toe box is wider. The Nike Next% isn’t made in wides, but it does fit wider. The laces are now asymmetrical to remove the pressure that some had on the top of their foot.

Nike Next% fits true to size. I wear a women’s size 10-11 wide and I found the unisex 9 to be sufficient.

Nike Vaporfly Next% Ride:

The Nike, Next% ride, is where all of the magic happens. That’s why people (myself included) are willing to spend the $250. Much of the shoe’s performance benefit comes from Nike’s ZoomX foam.

For Nike Next%, the Nike team added more ZoomX.  By adding an additional 4 mm of stack height, they added 1 mm of ZoomX foam. Why does this matter? The ride is significantly different than previous versions. The heel to toe drop of the Nike Next% is now 8 mm when previously it was 11 mm. (Your calves might be sorer).

Finally, the most important feature Nike added to the Next% was the rubberized bottom. Now if you run in a torrential downpour (like say Boston), you won’t slide around. Plus instead of the Nike Next% lasting 50 miles, it will last about 100.

Nike Vaporfly Next% Conclusion:

The Nike Next% is a faster shoe than the previous Nike Vaporfly. I’m surprised; it didn’t jump in cost because of more expensive materials to use in the product.  If you are willing to spend $250 to shave a minute or two off your race, then it’s worth it. Other brands are coming out with a similar carbon plated shoe soon too.

With the exception of NYCM last year, none of my PRs are from the Next % series. Last year at NYCM was the first marathon I ran in over 3 years so I don’t attribute PRing with the shoes. I personally have mixed feelings about the shoe. I think there are better shoes for shorter distances, but I do think they are a good marathon shoe (because I didn’t injure myself during last year’s marathon).

 

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Bondi 6,  Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

Have you bought a pair of Nike Nike%?

Do you love them? 

Exploring Ridgway State Park (Colorado)

Exploring Ridgway State Park (Colorado)

While in Colorado, my husband and I wanted to check out new parks.

Ridgway State Park Colorado

I got to see my first tumbleweed!

Ridgway State Park in Colorado was the perfect stop on the way to Ouray. There is a beautiful five-mile long reservoir to walk around.

Ridgeway State Park is only 15 miles north of Ouray. The park has plenty to do, including campgrounds, beautiful reservoir, fishing, hiking trails, and wildlife viewings. There is even a Volleyball court.

We stopped at the Pa Co Chu Puk Campground and walked around the area. We could see plenty of people with tent sites and full hookups. The Dakota Terrace and Elk Ridge Campgrounds look to be the most popular campgrounds, and there are accessible recreation areas. There are even a few cabins and yurts to rent.

One thing I found awesome was the Reservoir, and the Uncompahgre River was universally accessible for all. They had plenty of handicap options. There is a swimming beach located in one of the parking areas.

There are over 14 miles of marked trails in Ridgway State Park. Several of the trails are concrete and easy for biking or
rollerblading.  There are also many gravel trails for hikers wanted to be secluded. There are a variety of terrain options from grasslands, forests, and trails along the rivers. Everywhere you turn, there are beautiful views of the San Juan Mountains.

Ridgway State Park Colorado

Walking through Ridgway State Park

Ridgway State Park Colorado

View of the Reservoir

Ridgway State Park Colorado

View of the Reservoir and the San Juan Mountains

Ridgway State Park Colorado

View of the Uncompahgre River

Ridgway State Park was one of our favorite stops in our adventure. It’s accessible for all, and we saw plenty of families camping and relaxing in the Uncompahgre River. If we come back, I would love to check the campgrounds and spent a couple of nights in a cabin or yurt and on the hiking trails.

You Can See More Hikes Here. 

Questions for you:

Have you been to Ridgway State Park?

What is your favorite campground? 

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