The Difference Between Runners and Non-Runners

The Difference Between Runners and Non-Runners

It may be hard to remember, but there are people in the world that don’t run!  It’s a weird concept, but it exists.

The life of runners and non-runners is drastically different. I can remember a time I didn’t run and can relate to all of these. Non-runners are cool people too, you know!

Crawlin crab half marathon hampton va me running

How Do Runners and Non-Runners Compare?

Budget:

Non-runners: Non-runners save money for a lot of different things: happy hour, the newest technology or even a great wardrobe. Look at those ultra-chic sunglasses…glamorous.  Whatever it is, they put away money to do the enjoyable “fun things.”

Runners: We save money for new shoes, new workout clothes, and of course races. Don’t forget saving for the latest GPS watch. The smaller the watch, the more money it is. Without these things, we can’t do what we love! Right?  Who runs without a GPS Watch? Barbarians, that’s who!  When we show up to brunch in an old ratty pair of running leggings…you know why!

Beauty Routine:

Non-runners: Non-runners know how to make their features look great. They might spend an hour preparing for the day and look flawless every single day. They have time to hit every last detail, all while looking through the best wrinkle cream reviews to boot. Each outfit is perfect.  Every makeup application is perfect.
Runners: Runners have mastered the ability to shower and put on makeup within 10 minutes. Did that runner just workout on the treadmill or are those fashionable leggings? The lines are blurred, and the world may never know…Good thing fashion has evolved into a lot more comfort.

Eating on the Go and Snacking:

Non-Runners: Non-runners can go hours without eating. Forget to pack a snack? That’s fine, they just hit up the vending machine and are ready to go. 
 Life doesn’t revolve around snacking and being rungry all of the time. If a meeting goes late, oh well!

Runners: Our non-running friends know us as the vending machine to go. We have more snacks in our bags than a vending machine. Are you craving an apple or a chocolate bar? We have both. Runners are never without snacks because you never know when the stomach will start talking. When Runger hits, you have approximately 5 minutes to get us to the nearest food supply, or you will see rage that you have never seen before.

Week Days:

Non-Runners: Sleep until appropriate, wake up, get ready for work, and arrive to work on time. Spend work time doing work, get lunch, or relax, and eat packed lunch. Leave at the appropriate time, do an hour of exercise, or whatever, come home. Eat dinner, relax and go to bed.

Runners: Wake up at 4 am to get a run in. Shower, get ready for work, drink coffee in the shower, and get to work on time. When lunch hits, either tank a “runch” or running lunch,” or just gobble down lunch at the desk. Do more work, go home, get a second run in, or if you’re starving, eat, relax and go to bed.

Weekends:

Non-Runners: After the work week is over, non-runners often catch up with friends by going out for happy hour or dinner. They have a few drinks, dance and let loose. Most of Saturday and Sunday is spent relaxing and catching up on other hobbies.

Runners: Runners look forward to the weekend too! It’s either race weekend or long run weekend! Either way, we are waking up earlier than a weekday. We spend Friday night cuddled up in PJs, watching a movie and in bed sleeping before 9.

Weekend Brunches:

Non-Runners: Non-runners wake up anywhere between 8 and noon. After a well-rested sleep, they meet friends at a neighborhood breakfast spot. It doesn’t matter if it’s crowded because nonrunners are just waking up and going out to eat. They aren’t starving yet. Of course, our non-running friends look gorgeous and spent a few extra minutes getting ready for brunch. Heck, they might even fill up on mimosas beforehand! No wonder they are so happy waiting hours for a table!

Runners: On the weekend, runners wake up well before the weekday. We get our long runs in, and before we know it, it’s time to eat, and we are just trying to make it there on time. There is nothing more cringe-worthy than waiting for brunch after a long run. A messy bun, somewhat fashionable workout clothing and an old pair of sneakers are our signature brunch look.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Question for you: What is something you do that your “non-running” friends might not understand?

Reebok Floatride Run Fast Pro

Reebok Floatride Run Fast Pro

This is the first Reebok shoe I’ve ever tried. I needed a new workout flat, so I decided to try it out. The Reebok Flotride Run Fast Pro was designed as a racing shoe.  To my knowledge, it’s the lightest racing flat on the market weight just 3.5 ounces.

It’s more designed for a 5k but could you run a half or maybe (maybe!), a full marathon, sure.  Most of the weight is taken out of the upper material. There is a ton of cushion in the shoe for the weight, which is why the price point is $250.

Reebok Floatride Run Fast Pro Shoe Review

Fit:

Like most flats, they fit narrow. I usually wear between a women’s 10-11 wide. I found the unisex/9 to fit the best since it’s a bit wider.

The upper is very thin engineered mesh.  The thin mesh takes off a few ounces (which is a lot in the racing flat world). There aren’t any seams or overlays that would cause blisters. For a racing flat, it fits fairly average, and I’ve come to wear unisex 9.5 in most. I’ve done a few workouts in it, and haven’t had any issues with any irritation.

Reebok Floatride Run Fast Pro Shoe Review

Ride:

This is the first Reebok shoe I’ve tried and a different feel altogether. It’s much softer and with more cushion than a traditional flat like the Nike Streak, yet doesn’t have the weight.

Reebok uses an entirely different material than the traditional EVA.  The cushion they use it called “Pebax.” Why should you care about Pebax

Pebax is lighter and doesn’t compress as regular EVA foams. It’s softer and similar to the Vapor Fly. So yes, this shoe feels similar to the Nike Vaporfly but lacks the carbon plate.  The new types of foam brands are incorporating are expensive which is why they are costly to the consumer. You do feel as though your foot springs forward with every step.

One interesting thing is how much rubber there is despite how light they are.  For a racing flat, they have the most traction of any shoe I’ve seen. I haven’t run on a rainy day, but I don’t foresee it being a problem either. In fact, this will probably be my rainy day staple.  The entire sole of the shoe has traction.

I like running in them, and I feel fast when I do. They’ve become my staple speed shoe, and I think they’ll be a better 5k shoe than the Nike Vaporfly. Reebok Floatride Run Fast Pro Shoe Review

Conclusion:

I do believe this is a good flat and has become my favorite workout flat.  If you had asked me two months ago, would I like Reebok, I would have LOLed. It’s not a shoe you “go for an easy run in,” but it’s a great workout and racing shoe. To me, it feels the most like the Nike 4%, but I think the durability will be better than the Vaporfly. Plus, the traction responds much better in a rainy day.

To me, this is a very strong competitor to VP and would probably win for a better racing shoe for the 5k or in rainy/poor weather conditions.

Current Rotation:

Easy Runs: New Balance 1080, Brooks Glycerin 17, Hoka Mach 2

Long Runs: Hoka Cavu 2,, Nike Pegasus Turbo

Workouts: Nike LT Streak 4, Reebok Floatride Fast

Races: Reebok Floatride Fast, Nike Fly

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

What is your favorite racing shoe right now?

Have you run in Reebok?

 

Training Log: Grinding and Workouts

Training Log: Grinding and Workouts

I got done what I needed too last week. I ran the mileage, I did workouts, and for the most part, feel good about the training week.

Monday: Easy 60 minutes/core
Tuesday: Easy 60 minutes
Wednesday: 5X1000 with 90 seconds rest (average 6:28)
Thursday: OFF
Friday: Easy 10 miles with Alexis/core
Saturday: Solo 5k (20:19) (6:40, 6:29, 6:32) (Warm up/cool down total mileage 6
Sunday: 10 Miles averaging 7:14 pace

Thoughts:

Last week, there were several races I could have done, but none I really wanted too. I figured a week off would do me good since I’ve raced each weekend since early March. I like racing, but there is something about getting up on your own time, doing your own workout, and moving on. If I want my workout to start at 7:53 am…good! It’s hard to run when it doesn’t feel “omg so awesome”.  Luckily I’ve been getting Active Release on my legs with Dr. Craig (I pay him like anyone else) but if you’re local the entire team is great.

Workout Wednesday: 5X1000 (average 6:28 pace) with 90 seconds rest

My legs did not feel great during the workout, but I still got it done. Over the past few months, my legs haven’t felt great and I’ve started contemplated looking to see if something else is going on. Of course it’s not life threatening but paces that once felt effortless (6:28), feel like I’m running a new PR. Anyway, there wasn’t much to note about the workout and I was glad to get it done.

Solo 5k: 20:19

I thought about racing last week but nothing wowed me and I just wasn’t in the mood to run a longer race. There was a 15k but I ran a 10-mile last week and I have a half marathon next so it would be 3 long races in a row. I can do shorter races in a row, but I’m not ready to do longer races. Anyway, the weather was perfect and I ran 6:40, 6:29, 6:32. I was on dead legs so I’m happy with the effort level.

Long Run 10 miles averaging 7:14

I wanted a solid effort long run. The pace didn’t feel comfortable but I wasn’t gasping for air either. I was able to say hi to all of my friends (I feel like I saw a lot of people I knew). This is one of my better workouts of 2019 and I feel happy with it.  This gave me a little more confidence.

Posts from the Week:

Garden State 10 Miler (1:08.34)

March Training Log

Thank you to everyone who has subscribed to the LOLZletter!

I’m so excited that we just reached 500 subscribers and a new one comes out today (with a giveaway!) It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport.

Questions for you:

Do you have any big races in April?

How do you recover from hard workouts, races, or anything else?

Training Log: 2 Races and Building Fitness

Training Log: 2 Races and Building Fitness

Last week was exhausting for life and exhausting for running. It wasn’t until Friday that I felt like I wasn’t “on the go” and had some time for myself.  I feel like the last two weeks I’m starting to see glimpses of fitness come back. While I’m still nowhere near where I would like, I’ve made a successful jump towards it.

Monday: Easy 60 minutes/Core
Tuesday: OFF
Wednesday: 6X800s jog/800 easy (total miles 10)
Thursday: OFF
Friday: Easy 60 minutes/Core
Saturday: Adrenaline Run 5k (19:26)
Sunday: Shamrock Half Marathon (1:29.52)

Thoughts:

I took 2 rest days off again. I think I’m going to continue that trend for a few weeks as I increase my speed. Increasing speed and keeping at high mileage, is a recipe for disaster. On Tuesday, I just felt exhausted, and I had no energy. I knew any run wouldn’t be worth it. So I didn’t.  The easy runs were just easy and boring.  Many people ask about core my core routine, and I wrote about that here.

Workout Wednesday: 6X800s averaging 6:01 pace

This is one of my faster workouts in a while. I was surprised at how good I felt.  The last few were even under 6 minutes. I jogged 800 between for a total of 10 miles with warmup/cooldown.

Adrenaline Run 5k: 19:26

I’ll have a full recap later.  It’s my fastest 5k in several months. I didn’t feel good or bad, just meh.  The weather was windy with a good headwind or tailwind.  It’s been a fun race for me, because I get to see so many local people since our running store hosts it.  I was too busy talking to start my watch so I had no idea what I was running. I wouldn’t have run any different if I knew my splits.

Shamrock Half Marathon: 1:29.52

Of the two races, I’m happier with the 5k. I took the half out faster than I should have and faded quite a bit in the final miles. I’m proud that I was somehow able to muster up the energy to run just under 90 minutes. I won’t say I’m terribly excited about running a 1:30 half, but I’m not devastated either.  It was a good effort for where I’m at fitness-wise right now.

For now, I’m just plugging along. I’m hoping to keep the momentum of training and slowly getting back into shape.

Posts from the Week:

Guide to Vital Proteins Products: Collagen Peptides, Whey, and Gelatin

9 Years ago I Began Running

Glycerin 17 Shoe Review

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

What was your best workout?

How long does it take for you to “feel in shape”? 

Nike Pegasus Turbo 35 Shoe Review

Nike Pegasus Turbo 35 Shoe Review

The Nike Pegasus is most people’s first running shoe.  In fact, way back in 2011, it was my first running shoe.  It’s gone through many changes.  This year, it has divided into two, and the current models are both the Nike Pegasus 35 and the Nike Pegasus 25 Turbo. They are two completely different shoes with different fits, feels, rides, and prices.   My foot barely fits into the regular width of the Pegasus 35 so I haven’t bothered running in it.

The Nike Pegasus Turbo is a lightweight weight and “faster” version of the Pegasus.  It uses the same ZoomX foam as the Vaporfly 4%.  That’s why it comes in at $180 and has a very short life.

Nike Pegasus Turbo Shoe Review

I bought the Pegasus Turbo 35 because I was looking for a long run/faster shoe.  During previous training cycles, I would have used a less cushioned shoes like a racing flat.

My only goal of this training cycle is to start and finish the marathon healthy.  Among many things, it means adding a lot more cushion into my training shoes. I’m not the type of runner that can get away minimal shoes anyway.  I did recently write about racing flats and if they are right for you.

Nike Pegasus Turbo Shoe Review

The Pegasus Turbo has ZoomX foam, which is lighter and provides more energy return than the regular Pegasus.  The only shoes that have the ZoomX foam are the Vaporfly Elite, Vaporfly 4%, and now the Pegasus Turbo.  You’ll know if your shoe has the foam because they are only available is certain colors and far more expensive than the traditional shoe.

Fit:

The upper of the Turbo is very different than the regular Pegasus and a lot wider. It’s one of the reasons I wanted to try the Turbo versus the normal Pegasus.

Of course, I want to run faster, but the Turbo is just a wider shoe. I usually wear a women’s size 10-11 wide and I cannot fit my foot into the regular Pegasus.

I can, however, wear a women’s 10 in the turbo with no problem.  The Turbo is one of the few shoes that a standard size 10 feels comfortable to me.

The upper of the Pegasus Turbo generally is a similar to the regular Pegasus but a little more sturdy.  One thing worth mentioning is the Racing Stripe on the shoe. It looks cool, sure, but it takes a lot of breathability out of the shoe. To me personally, it seems cheap.  It could have been screen printed onto the shoe with no issues with the material.

Nike Pegasus Turbo Shoe Review

Ride:

Both the Pegasus and Pegasus Turbo look like aggressive shoes.  They have a curved heel almost resembling a fin.  Nike mentions the fin is aerodynamic.  Every second matter right?  I like shoes that you can see the technology.  In any of the Turbo shoes, you can see where the two layers of foam meet.  You can see the material crush down in both the Vaporfly and Nike Pegasus Turbo.

During long runs, it’s much softer than the regular Pegasus and resembles the squishy of the Vomero but fast…very fast.  All of my long runs have been productive in the shoe.  Is it the shoe? Is it my training? I’m able to get good leg turnover in the shoe.

Nike Pegasus Turbo Shoe Review

Conclusion:

I think the Nike Pegasus Turbo is a good shoe, however, there are a few things that I think need to be mentioned.  I’ll continue to run in it and get faster long runs, but do I think it’s worth all of the hype? That I’m not sure.

  • The shoe is not durable. Similar to the VaporFly, you aren’t going to get “a lot” of mileage in them. The foam tends to break down in the Turbo around 150 miles.  Why don’t people talk about this? The Vaporfly is only designed to last 2 or so marathons?
  • The price. $180 is a lot for a neutral, low cushioned, shoe.

I don’t think it’s a bad shoe, but for me, it serves its purpose as a long, fast, run shoe. I’m not going to take it out for a leisurely jog or add additional mileage in it.

If your foot is a more narrow width, I would probably suggest getting the regular Pegasus, as it’s significantly cheaper and you get more mileage out it.  I know I’m in the minority, but I think it’s more of a social media shoe than anything.  Obviously, most people love it, since it sells out so quickly!

Current Shoe Rotation:

Long Runs: Nike Pegasus Turbo, Hoka Cavu

Easy Run/Daily Runs: Brooks Glycerin, New Balance 1080, On Cloudace 

Workouts: Nike Pegasus Turbo, Nike Zoom Streak or Saucony Type A

Questions for you:

What was your first running shoe?

What shoe do you race most often in? 

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