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How to be an Instagram Runner

How to be an Instagram Runner
Step One: You have an Instagram.
Step Two (maybe?): You run.

In that order

In the last few years, social media has taken off. Before instagram, there was blogging and before blogging there was myspace and xanga. Who logged a workout on those?

Now social media is here to stay because who doesn’t want to take photos of themselves and promote their running. If there is anything I’ve learned, people love to talk about themselves (myself included).

So Now You’ve Thought: “Being an Instagram Runner is for me”…

how to be an instagram runner

Here are a Few Easy Techniques to Become an InstaRunner:

Step One: Create a (FREE) Instagram:

You need Instagram to be an Instagram runner. Contrary to popular belief, you don’t actually need to run. (Fake it until you make it!) You just need an Instagram.

Step Two: Run (Maybe):

Here is the thing about being an Instagram runner. You don’t actually have to run; you just need to say you did! I always advise honesty but don’t feel pressured to run just because you are an Instagram runner now.

A Few Posts You Should Include on your Feed:

The Watch Pose:

Stand with your watch on your wrist with your workout done. Snap photo to maybe include shoes. Decorate your wrist with pieces of jewelry to enhance the wrist. Bracelets, charms, whatever. Just add your own artistic flair.

Tips:

  • Try to find pretty grass to stand on. The bathroom or dirty floor is not desirable.
  • Clean your watch face.  It’s your watches time to shine!
  • If your workout did not go as planned and you would like to look faster, just end early. Want to look like you ran 13.1 miles in 62 minutes, just end early and log the 62 minutes. You could even write (in paintshop) 13.1 on your watch for better authenticity.

The Run Shot:

This can be the hardest to master so don’t get discouraged. Some instarunners actually have professional photographers to follow them around every workout! Talk about glamorous.

Tips:

  • Buy a high-end camera. You have to pay to play! $800+!
  • Don’t choose a rainy day, that makes photos blurry.
  • Jog in place. That way you can get higher quality photos.
  • If you don’t have at least 1 fight with your significant other about taking the shot, you are doing it wrong!
  • Use video mode and just grab a shot that way.

The Motivational Shot:

Now, this is usually a recycled photo and that’s okay. Got a favorite picture of yourself from the 1980s with a big perm?  Perfect. The point of this photo is not the photo; it’s the caption.

Tips:

  • You should have a minimum caption length of 400 words. This is generally what is accepted to be “motivational.”
  • It should provide some sort of motivation. Hard to get out the door that day? Struggle from lack of sleep? Pants just don’t fit right? Struggle to balance everything? Those are just some starters, but any old motivation will do. Remember, you are your biggest fan.

Post-Run Selfie:

This can get confusing because you don’t need to run, just post a selfie saying you did.

Tips:

  • Make sure to download a photo app that allows you to make your skin as smooth as porcelain. Runners don’t sweat or have any lumps and bumps.
  • Just selfie. Work your best angle from myspace angle to straight forward. Do you have a signature pose? Mine’s winking!

The Runner Flatlay:

Once you’ve found a few brands you like, this is your time to make them shine.  Before a race take a photo of every piece of gear you plan to wear (don’t forget underwear!).  Arrange neatly so your fans can see your plan. They might want to track or recognize you on the course (thank your new found celebrity runner status!).

Tips:

  • Include everything, even things you might think you would want but will never use. It’s better to be safe than sorry in this shot.
  • Make sure to find a beautiful backdrop. Don’t use the bathroom. Perhaps go to a fancy hotel with a 50,000 dollar rug. The hotel bought that rug for you to take the shot on!

These are just the basics to help you become what you’ve always dreamed, an Instagram runner!

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Question for you: What other Instagram runner techniques do you use?

 

 

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How to Bounce Back from a Bad Race

How to Bounce Back from a Bad Race

The week before last I had a bad race at the Phillies 5k. While yes, you can argue it was windy, my disappointing race wasn’t because of that.  Honestly, it wasn’t my day and these things happen.  While it stinks, I race so frequently there is no point to let one bad race ruin my day.

How to Bounce Back from a Bad Race

So What Can You Do After a Bad Race?

Like the movie, Frozen, let it go…

Find the Positives:

When I finished the Phillies 5k, the first thing I thought was: Wow I felt awful. Then I quickly remembered I’m injury free.  The entire race was miserable, my mental spot was not great, but I finished healthy.

After cooling down, I caught up with one of my closest friends and still hung out. I saw many locals and chatted for a while. They asked how the race went, and I said: “awful it wasn’t my day for running, but it’s just running”.

Running isn’t my job; it’s a hobby.  If a hobby stresses you out or causes you misery, it’s time to find a new one. Sure, I won’t always “love running” but instead of dwelling on a bad race, look for the good.

It’s important to look at the positives of your race:

Did you finish healthy and injury free?  Could you smile afterward and have a good day?

Next, Reflect and Figure out Why:

Immediately after the 5k, I chalked it up to being “a bad race”.

Now that I’ve sat back and reflected, I know there are plenty of reasons the 5k was not a great race for me.

My body was still tired from the weekend prior. I haven’t eaten or slept well, and I’ve increased speed and racing. Plus, I ran a half marathon the weekend prior. I’ve done it a dozen times, but I’ve always been more fit.

None are excuses but they all contribute to why my race didn’t go well.  Reflecting back and having a few answers is better than, “it just didn’t.”

It gives you ways and reasons to improve.  You can make adjustments to your training, nutrition, or sleep patterns.

Most Importantly: Recover and Set New Goals:

After running a bad race, it’s important to take time to recover.  Even though the race didn’t go well, don’t go crazy. Take time to recover and relax.  Then set your sights on a new race or goal.

Maybe a marathon burned you out…

Or maybe you want to run longer races…

Find something to get excited and refocused about! 

For me personally, I have many races over the next two months. While I’m not looking for magical redemption, I’m looking forward to chipping away my time and getting back into better fitness.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

How do you get over a bad race?

What has been your least enjoyable race?

Training: Recovery and a Bad Race

Training: Recovery and a Bad Race

Last weeks training was somewhat of a cutdown week. I skipped my midweek workout to recover from both the Adrenaline 5k and Shamrock 13.1. I got Active Release done, and I tried to focus on sleeping.  I recovered moderately well but didn’t feel great at the Phillies 5k.

Monday: OFF
Tuesday: Easy 60 minutes in VA
Wednesday: Easy 60 minutes in NJ
Thursday: OFF
Friday: Easy 60 minutes in NJ/core
Saturday: Phillies 5k (20:08)/core
Sunday: Long Run

Thoughts:

My easy runs were just that, easy. As I’ve increased my speed (with races) during the last few weeks, and I’ve opted to take two rest days a week versus 1. I know it’s kept me healthier coming back. While I might not be as “fast” coming back, I’m not injured.

Over the last two weeks, I’ve had some slight pain in my metatarsals. It hasn’t been anything to alter my stride or anything too serious, but enough that I’ve been more cautious. With Active Release, Dr. Craig at Dr. Kemonosh’s office has helped flush it out. I don’t like to take any chances with metatarsal pain because not much at the top of the foot except bone.

I’ve been keeping up with core more. I know core and strength is something I often skip so I’ve been adding it in.  I’ve just been doing the same exercises as usual.

Phillies 5k: (20:08)

I didn’t feel good at the Phillies 5k from the get-go. It’s hard to go to a race you’ve won and got third, but even if I felt good, I’m not in the shape that would have won anyway. As I warmed up, my legs still felt tired.  I think it was a combination of the previous weekends races as well as getting a lot of Active Release done to keep me healthy. Short term, it stunk. Long term, it’s just another workout to reach me to bigger goals.

Anyway, my splits themselves were 6:35, 6:35, 6:20. (The last mile had tailwind). It was windy the first two miles around the water, and then we had a tailwind the last mile. I couldn’t get my turnover any faster.  It was nice to see so many friends and locals racing.

Long Run: 14 miles averaging 8:03 pace with the last four around 7:10

This was a great long run. I started easy and slowly progressed into a faster run. The second half of the run was faster, and I just felt good all around.  It felt good to have a strong long run.

Posts from the Week:

 Shamrock Half Marathon (1:29.52)

Adrenaline 5k (19:26)

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

Have you had a bad race recently?

Are you a Phillies fan?

Adrenaline 5k (19:26)

On Saturday I ran the Adrenaline Run 5k. The Adrenaline Run is one of the most competitive 5ks in the greater Philadelphia/New Jersey area. It sells out every year and the typically the first 150 finishers all run under 20 minutes. This year I ran 19:26 and was around 130th place.

I’m biased by RunningCo. Always does a great job putting the race together and it’s always a lot of fun. Anyway, after an exhausting and busy week, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I knew I wouldn’t be running 18:29 like last year, but I was hoping to be faster than the last 5k I ran.

I warmed up a few miles and got to the start line around 10 minutes early. Since I knew quite a few people there, (I would think about 1/3rd), I talked and caught up with several people. Before I knew it, we were off.

The start is jam-packed. Since I knew I would be nowhere near the front, I didn’t line up in the front. As we began running, I realized around .5 I had forgotten to start my watch. In a 5k, I thought it seemed silly to start it then, so I just didn’t. I’ve run races with GPS before, and while it’s nice to know your splits, your legs still move without a watch. I could have run 22 minutes or 18 minutes, and I would have had no clue.

The first mile was crowded. It was hard to get any rhythm. We ran straight into a headwind. It was one of the windier days and so we were just running into a headwind down Kings Highway. I saw my co-workers and friends in front of the store which is always motivating.

We rounded the corner near Saxbys and went straight into the neighborhoods. It’s a long flat, windy stretch. If it wasn’t windy, it’s easy to build speed there.

Just after mile 1, we turned the corner, went down a small downhill and hit the water stop. It was nice not to be in the wind anymore. We went up a few inclines. My husband, who hasn’t been running much, passed me around mile 2. I was happy for him and just focused on the last mile.

The last mile went straight back Kings Highway and headed towards the finish. It’s flat and fast, and this year with the tailwind it was even faster. (A perk of the headwind going out). If I were to guess, my bet is my last mile was somewhere around 6:0X because of the tailwind. With the long stretch, you can see the finish line for over a half mile away.

me running adrenaline run

I saw the clock go over 19 and I knew somewhere where I was speed wise. I had no clue until that point. I powered as much as I could and crossed in 19:26. I’m happy with my effort for where I am, fitness wise. It’s always tough not to compare yourself to a faster year, but it’s my fastest 5k in several months so I can’t complain about that.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

What is your favorite 5k?

Have you ever raced without a watch? I’ve done many. At my first marathon, NYCM, my watch stopped working at the start (and it never worked again).

Training Log: 2 Races and Building Fitness

Training Log: 2 Races and Building Fitness

Last week was exhausting for life and exhausting for running. It wasn’t until Friday that I felt like I wasn’t “on the go” and had some time for myself.  I feel like the last two weeks I’m starting to see glimpses of fitness come back. While I’m still nowhere near where I would like, I’ve made a successful jump towards it.

Monday: Easy 60 minutes/Core
Tuesday: OFF
Wednesday: 6X800s jog/800 easy (total miles 10)
Thursday: OFF
Friday: Easy 60 minutes/Core
Saturday: Adrenaline Run 5k (19:26)
Sunday: Shamrock Half Marathon (1:29.52)

Thoughts:

I took 2 rest days off again. I think I’m going to continue that trend for a few weeks as I increase my speed. Increasing speed and keeping at high mileage, is a recipe for disaster. On Tuesday, I just felt exhausted, and I had no energy. I knew any run wouldn’t be worth it. So I didn’t.  The easy runs were just easy and boring.  Many people ask about core my core routine, and I wrote about that here.

Workout Wednesday: 6X800s averaging 6:01 pace

This is one of my faster workouts in a while. I was surprised at how good I felt.  The last few were even under 6 minutes. I jogged 800 between for a total of 10 miles with warmup/cooldown.

Adrenaline Run 5k: 19:26

I’ll have a full recap later.  It’s my fastest 5k in several months. I didn’t feel good or bad, just meh.  The weather was windy with a good headwind or tailwind.  It’s been a fun race for me, because I get to see so many local people since our running store hosts it.  I was too busy talking to start my watch so I had no idea what I was running. I wouldn’t have run any different if I knew my splits.

Shamrock Half Marathon: 1:29.52

Of the two races, I’m happier with the 5k. I took the half out faster than I should have and faded quite a bit in the final miles. I’m proud that I was somehow able to muster up the energy to run just under 90 minutes. I won’t say I’m terribly excited about running a 1:30 half, but I’m not devastated either.  It was a good effort for where I’m at fitness-wise right now.

For now, I’m just plugging along. I’m hoping to keep the momentum of training and slowly getting back into shape.

Posts from the Week:

Guide to Vital Proteins Products: Collagen Peptides, Whey, and Gelatin

9 Years ago I Began Running

Glycerin 17 Shoe Review

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

What was your best workout?

How long does it take for you to “feel in shape”? 

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