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Saucony Triumph 17 Shoe Review

Saucony Triumph 17 Shoe Review

Saucony Triumph 17 Shoe Review

Let me cut to the chase here. The Saucony Triumph 17 has gone through a massive update. Usually, when people come to the store and ask: “has the updated version of my shoe changed much,” the answer is no. The Saucony Triumph 17 is completely redesigned (along with many Saucony shoes coming out). It’s not changed in a bad way, but it’s very different than the last five years of ISO and everun models.

What’s new with the Saucony Triumph 17?

Big things. The cushioning has changed from “everun midsole” to “PWRRUN+ midsole.” What is “PWRRUN”? According to Saucony, it’s lighter and softer.

Saucony Triumph 17 Quick Facts:

Weight: 9.2 oz

Heel to Toe Drop: 8 mm

Saucony Triumph 17 Fit:

Like many running shoes, the Saucony Triumph 17 engineered mesh upper is soft, seamless, and flexible. If you have bunions or a wider forefront, your feet don’t rub. The Saucony Triumph has had a more freeing upper compared to other brands. This hasn’t changed and there isn’t a lot of structure in the Saucony Triumph 17 upper.

The massive change is that the Saucony Triumph 17 no longer uses the ISO fit. It’s gone back to regular shoelaces. I’ve worn the Saucony Triumph since the original model of the ISO. (The Saucony Triumph ISO was the best version of this shoe and I still stand by that). The formfit acts like a luxurious bucket seat to holds the foot into place. I’ve worn anywhere between a 10-10.5 wide and the 10.5 wide seems to fit the best this version.

Saucony Triumph 17 Shoe Review

Saucony Triumph 17 Ride:

Since the Saucony Triumph 17 no longer uses everun, the ride will feel different. The new PWRRUN+ midsole makes the Saucony Triumph 25% lighter and much softer. It feels like a higher cushioned shoe. With the everun, the Saucony Ride and the Saucony Triumph began feeling too similar. Why pay for the Saucony Triumph when the $120 felt basically the same? Now, there is a separation and you can feel that soft cushion in the Saucony Triumph.

The PWRRUN+ has a springy and responsive underfoot feel but also allows you to finish a run strong and feeling fresh. With the amount of cushion in the Saucony Triumph, you don’t feel beat up.

The traction of the Saucony Triumph 17 is great. There is plenty of crystalized rubber and with the rubber outsole hard to lose traction in an inclement weather day.

I’ve run easy runs, long runs, and a workout. I feel (for me), the Saucony Triumph 17 works best as an easy run shoe.

Saucony Triumph 17 Shoe Review

Saucony Triumph 17 Conclusion:

The Saucony Triumph 17 has changed a lot. It’s lighter and softer than everun. It’s a good shoe, but it is very different than previous models. I like it and I’m glad Saucony has updated it.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Diadora Mythos Elite TRX, Hoka Bondi 6, Saucony Triumph 17

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

Hae you tried the Saucony Triumph 17? 

What is your favorite shoe? 

 

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Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review

The Diadora Mythos Elite TRX is a newly updated shoe from Diadora. For many, Diadora is an unfamiliar brand. If you played soccer, you’d know Diadora is an Italian company that once specialized in both soccer and lifestyle shoes. A few years ago, Diadora moved into running shoes and done a great job. The plush cushioning in their models has been well received.  Plus, many of their models are “only” updated every 18 months to 2 years. Finally, the United States Headquarters is in Philadelphia, which I can appreciate.

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Quick Facts:

Heel to Toe Drop: 10 mm

Weight: 10.2 oz

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Fit:

The brand, Diadora, is a wider last shoe altogether. If your feet are wider, it might be a good brand to look into. Many of their models are roomy enough to go down a half size. I don’t because it’s not enough space for me, but many people do. The  Diadora Mythos Elite TRX has a contoured footbed that cradles and guides the foot in a neutral path.

Typically in running shoes, I wear a size 10-11 wide. In the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX, I find a size 10 to be most appropriate.

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Ride:

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX uses a new concept in running technology. It gives you support when you need it and not when you don’t need it. The Diadora Mythos Elite TRX simulates the presence of a traditional medial side dual-density system and achieves the same end result by the subtraction of the section on the lateral side.

For instance, say one of your feet pronates and the other does not, the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX will give support to the foot that needs it but will remain neutral for those who don’t. Similar to the once-beloved Nike Lunarglide. Come to think of it; if you were ever a Nike Lunarglide fan, the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX is a shoe to look into.

Blushield technology allows neutral runners to stay neutral, but those were needing stability to get that as well. Theoretically, anyone can run in the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX. Do I quite believe “anyone can run in the shoe,” no, but it will provide support if you need it and not if you don’t.

I’ve run in the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX for several different runs, including workouts, long runs, and easy runs. With the amount of cushion in the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX, I prefer the shoe for easy runs.

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Conclusion:

I like the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX and it’s a great trainer for easy runs or recovery runs. The extra cushion during training feels great during recovery runs. If you are looking for a new brand to try, Diadora is a great option. Plus, they sponsor a couple of local races, including the New Jersey Marathon and Philly 10k.  The Diadora Mythos Elite TRX is exclusively available in run specialty. If you are local, I know RunningCo. of Haddonfield, Philly Runner, North Wales Running Company, and Runners High all carry the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Diadora Mythos Elite TRX, Hoka Bondi 6,  Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

Hae you tried Diadora?

What is your favorite recovery day trainer?

 

The Anatomy of a Running Shoe

The Anatomy of a Running Shoe

The Anatomy of a Running Shoe:

The anatomy of a running shoe is a post I’ve wanted to write for a while.

The anatomy of a running shoe

Since I write a shoe review most weeks, it occurred to me that many people didn’t realize what the actual parts that made up a running shoe are. No shame in that; your only job is to make sure the shoe feels good when you wear it.  It is easier to describe what you like or don’t like in a shoe if you know a few basic terms.

Pictured is the New Balance 1500 (a racing flat ideal for 5ks to marathons)

Anatomy of a running shoe

The “Upper”: 

The upper part of a shoe is exactly what it sounds like: the top of the shoe.  These days, most brands use an upper made of lightweight, breathable, engineered mesh. Although some uppers are made from leather or suede too. Some shoes are even waterproof and the upper can keep water out while still keeping it breathable.

Now, most uppers are seamless, so it doesn’t rub against a wider forefront or bunion. The upper and the shoelaces help secure the foot.  The upper protects your feet and is also what helps keep dirt, rocks or debris out of a shoe.

The anatomy of a running shoe

Toe Box:

The toe box of a running shoe is generally the widest part of the shoe and where your feet and toes are located. You always want movement in the toebox and don’t want your feet to feel squished.

You should be able to wiggle your toes before and after a run comfortably. There should also be about the width of your thumbs length from your longest toe (even if your longest toe is your second or third toe). Having the extra space helps reduce the loss of toenails and keeps your feet from going numb.

Also Included in the Upper Anatomy of a Running Shoe:

Shoe Laces: Shoelaces or Velcro are what hold the top of your foot securely into place. This portion of the shoe is one of the most important for fit in the anatomy of a running shoe.

Tongue: Many people don’t realize the tongue has a purpose! It protects the top of your foot from the pressure of shoelaces but also prevents debris from getting inside.

Heel counter: The heel counter is the firm cup in the back of your shoe to secure your heel. The heel counter makes sure your foot doesn’t slide around. It’s essential always to untie your shoes so you don’t damage the heel counter. Damaging it will bend the plastic and can cause Achilles tendon issues.

Midsole:

The midsole of a running shoe is located between the outsole and the upper. The upper is attached to the midsole of the shoe. Currently, the majority of midsoles are made of a foam called EVA (called ethyl vinyl acetate). Each brand uses different cushioning or EVA that they deem “the best.”

Outsole:

The outsole is a critical component of running shoes, especially when running in inclement weather. The outside is what provides traction on the roads. In trail shoes, the outsole is often thicker to offer more traction. Each brand has different traction in grooves to protect the feet.

Most road shoes are made from blown rubber, which is softer and more flexible. A trail shoe is usually more rigid and is often made of carbon rubber to keep it stiff.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Medial Post:

Not every shoe has a medial post or stability piece to it. Many do, but not all. Most running shoes fall into one of the following combinations: motion control, neutral shoes, or stability shoes. Motion control shoes are designed with the most support, where neutral have zero support. (They can have cushion, but keep in mind support does equal cushion).Stability helps keep a collapsed arch propped in or someone who pronates back into neutral.

The medial post is one of the most important components to determining if a shoe will work for you. If you need a lot of stability and the shoe is neutral, chances are it won’t work. Not everyone needs medial support and using a shoe that has support when you don’t need it can lead to other issues. Most stability components of a shoe are made out of a dual-density combination of TPU (thermoplastic urethane) and EVA.

Not all stability pieces are the same. Some shoes provide minor stability where some is much more corrective. Each brand and each shoe within a brand are different.

The Shank:

Many people don’t even realize a running shoe “shank” exists. The shank is what controls the flexion and torsion of a shoe. It helps the bend naturally and helps with a smooth transition from heel to toe.  The stiffer the shank, the less the shoe will flex.

Heel Drop:

One of the most common questions in the running world, is what a shoe heel to toe drop? I wrote a newsletter on it a few months ago. In short, the heel to toe drop is the height of the heel minus the height of the forefront (in millimeters). For example, a zero drop shoe (like the brand Altra) has the same height and cushion in the heel as the forefront. Most traditional shoes have between 10-12 mm.

Thicker heels will usually cause your heel to drop and hit the ground first, whereas a thinner heel will be easier to run more on your forefront. There is no right or wrong heel drop in the anatomy of a running shoe but it takes trial and error to figure out what works best for you.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Last:

When it comes to last, not every brand is the same. The last of the shoe is essentially the shape of the shoe. Most running shoe lasts curved, but shoe lasts can be curved, semi-curved, or straight. If you flip over and look at your Brooks shoe, you can see it curves in the front, pinches in the middle, and curves out in the back. Most traditional running shoes are semi-curved. Finding a last that matches the shape of your foot is just as important as finding a shoe that matches your needs structurally. In the anatomy of a running shoe, the last is what will help find the correct fit.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Why is the Anatomy of a Running Shoe Important for Runners?

Knowing the anatomy of a running shoe because you can find the shoe that works for you both structural and by shape. At the end of the day, you want to find the shoe you are most comfortable in.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport.

Questions for you:

What is your favorite shoe? Why? 

Were you familiar with the anatomy of a running shoe?

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

So far, New Balance has created a few shoes in their “Fuelcell line.” The New Balance Fuelcell Rebel (I most likely will run New York City Marathon in), the New Balance 5280 (the carbon plated 1m-5k shoe), The Balance Fuelcell Propel (which I have yet to try) and the New Balance Fuelcell Echo.

I initially thought the New Balance Fuelcell Echo would be my marathon shoe, but I think (for me), the New Balance Fuelcell Rebel will be a bit better.In general, the New Balance Fuelcell collection and technology is designed to be fast.

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Quick Facts:

Weight: 8.3 oz

Heel to Toe Drop: 6 mm

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Fit:

The New Balance Fuelcell Echo fits almost exactly like a sock. I haven’t had a shoe fit so well and be comfortable from putting it on in a while.

The New Balance Fuelcell Echo uses an engineered knit upper, which provides structure but breathes well. I’ve run a couple of times in hot and humid conditions and the New Balance Fuelcell Echo breathed throughout the run.

The heel of the New Balance Fuelcell Echo has a TPU heel counter, which makes or a secure fit. Many brands, including the Brooks Levitate 2, have tried (and failed) to use a higher heel counter. The New Balance Fuelcell Echo doesn’t irritate the heel of the shoe and fits well.

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

I typically wear between a women’s size 10-11 wide and the 10.5 fits well. 

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Ride:

All of the New Balance Fuelcell shoes are designed with speed and performance in mind. They are all designed to be faster shoes. Where does the New Balance Fuelcell Echo fit? The New Balance Fuelcell Echo is a good road and an everyday trainer. While you can race or run faster, it’s more designed for the bulk of your mileage.

New Balance’s vision with the New Balance Fuelcell Echo is the shoe you can run in as well as casually wear around. I tend to agree that it’s one of the few trainers I like for both running and casually living life.

Like the New Balance Fuelcell Rebel, the Fuelcell Echo has a full-length fuel cell midsole. That means it has a high energy return.

Finally, one thing I appreciate in the New Balance Fuelcell Echo is the traction and grip. The entire outside is crafted with “Ndurance,” which is a rubber that is both light but also durable. The New Balance Fuelcell Echo isn’t a shoe I would take on trails, but it is great for inclement weather.

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Conclusion:

The New Balance Fuelcell Echo surprised me. I appreciate the cushion of the Fuelcell Echo but also that it can be worn more as a lifestyle shoe.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Bondi 6,  Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

What is a shoe you wear casually? 

What is your favorite racing shoe? 

 

Hoka One One Rincon Shoe Review

Hoka One One Rincon Shoe Review

The Hoka One One Rincon is a brand new shoe from Hoka this year. I’ve been curious about this shoe since it came out in June but needed to prioritize buying trainers (like the Hoka Bondi 6) I knew I could run miles in with no issues.

I knew I would probably like the Hoka Rincon, but also knew I needed to have at least one shoe in my rotation that was tried and true. Anyway, the long story short is it took me a little while to buy a pair.

The Rincon is designed to be a fast shoe from Hoka One One. It’s lighter than most (I believe just the Hoka Cavu 2 is lighter).

Hoka One One Rincon Shoe Review

Quick Stats:
Weight: 6.3 oz
Drop 5 mm

Fit:

Like most of their shoes now, Hoka uses a single layer of engineered mesh for the upper.  It’s thin and lightweight, plus it breathes well. If you’ve run in the Hoka One One Carbon X, it fits very similar.  The single layer of mesh allows wider feet or someone with bunions to feel more comfortable. I’m usually a women’s size 10-11 wide, and I find the 10.5 to fit well (they aren’t made in wide…yet).

Hoka One One Rincon Shoe Review

One thing to keep in mind is that there isn’t much structure in the upper of the shoe.  The feet can splay out. Like the newer models of Hoka, there is a pull tab at the heel counter to get it up. There is a lack of plastic in the heel which keeps it from pinching the Achilles. The pull tab allows it to slide up without damaging it.

Hoka One One Rincon Shoe Review

Ride:

The Hoka One One Rincon has a unique ride to it (even from Hoka). It has as much cushion as the Hoka Clifton, however, weighs about an ounce less. It’s much more responsive than the Clifton and feels like a shoe I want to run fast in (like the Mach and Cavu). The Hoka Rincon uses the early stage Meta-Rocker to allow for quicker turnover. It’s designed for true speed or as a race shoe. (You can read more about Hoka’s technology and “Meta-Rockers” here).

If you’ve never run in Hoka before, this is a great model to start. It’s responsive enough that you won’t feel too disconnected from the ground.  For me, it fits best as a fast-paced, long run shoe, or even a race day shoe. I like more amount of cushion for a daily trainer.

One last thing to add is there is a lack of traction on the bottom of the shoe. I do wish added rubber on the bottom. There is rubber on the outsole in strategic spots but it’s not a shoe that would perform well in rainy/icy conditions.

Hoka One One Rincon Shoe Review

Hoka Rincon Conclusion:

Sometimes brand new running shoe models miss their mark, but the Hoka Rincon has quickly become one of my favorite Hoka One One models (my favorite for heavy training is the Hoka Bondi and for speed, work is the Hoka Cavu).

If you’re looking to try out the brand Hoka, the Hoka Rincon is a great place to start. If you are familiar with Hoka and looking for a lightweight racer or trainer, the Hoka Rincon would be a great shoe for your rotation.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Bondi 6Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast Pro, Hoka Rincon

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races:  Reebok Run fast Pro

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. This week is all about carbon plate shoes,

Questions for you:

Have you tried a new shoe lately?

What is your favorite running shoe?

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