Mizuno Wave Sky 3 Shoe Review
Running, Running Reads

Mizuno Wave Sky 3 Shoe Review

Mizuno Wave Sky 3 Shoe Review

I haven’t found a Mizuno shoe I’ve liked as much as the Mizuno Wave Engima in quite some time. A few weeks ago, I went for a group run with our Mizuno rep and he let me run a few miles in the Mizuno Wave Sky 3. I couldn’t believe how much I liked them and it was a shoe I was looking for. A high cushioned, neutral trainer, that could take the pounding of easy runs.

While I’m familiar with the previous versions of the Mizuno Wave Sky, I haven’t run any significant mileage in them.

The Mizuno Wave Sky 3 is different from traditional Mizuno models like the Wave Rider and Wave Inspire. The Mizuno Wave Sky 3 lacks the Mizuno Wave Plate and I’ll get into that later.

Mizuno Wave Sky 3 Shoe Review

Mizuno Wave Sky 3 Quick Facts:

Weight: 9.3 oz

Drop: 10 mm

Mizuno Wave Sky Waveknit 3 Fit:

Mizuno has gone to the “Waveknit” upper in many of its models. I reviewed the Waveknit R2 and Waveknit R3 (the Mizuno Wave Rider but a different upper).

The Waveknit upper in the Mizuno Wave Sky 3 makes the shoe fit and feel different. The knit construction gives the shoe a lightweight structure and a more streamlined fit. It doesn’t feel constricting but allows the foot to breathe. According to Mizuno, the waveknit upper construction provides a comfortable fit with natural movement.  It does feel slightly tighter than the traditional upper and I typically recommend going up a half size.

Mizuno Wave Sky 3 Shoe Review

The Waveknit Upper uses an open-knit pattern, which allows sweat to evaporate. With the removal of a few overlays and the Waveknit mesh upper, it’s about .2 ounces lighter.

Fit wise; the Mizuno Wave Sky 3 fits fairly true to size. From time to time, a Mizuno shoe is too narrow for my foot. In running shoes, I wear anything from a women’s size 10-11 wide and I’ve found the size 11 to fit perfectly.

Mizuno Wave Sky 3 Shoe Review

Mizuno Wave Sky 3 Ride:

The Mizuno Wave Sky 3 uses a brand new cushioning that removes the “Wave Plate” altogether. What is the Wave Plate? Why does it matter?

Mizuno’s Wave Plate is in almost all of their shoes. It’s a thin, rigid piece of plastic between the layers of the midsole. It’s what gives Mizuno shoes that firm but smooth transition while running.

Without the Wave Plate in the Mizuno Wave Sky 3, the shoe is much softer and plush experience. So if the Mizuno Wave Sky 3 doesn’t use the traditional wave plate, what does it use?

The new midsole of the Mizuno Wave Sky 3 uses a combination of XPop PU Foam and Mizuno u4icX midsole (Mizuno foam wave that delivers a softer underfoot feeling).

Mizuno Wave Sky 3 Shoe Review

Another component I appreciate of the Mizuno Wave Sky 3, is the durable carbon rubber outsole. The first run I did in the Mizuno Wave Sky 3 was in the torrential pouring rain and I didn’t feel like I was sliding at all.

Mizuno Wave Sky 3 Shoe Review
Lets just ignore how dirty my Mizuno Wave Sky 3 are. I’ve put over 100 miles in them in the last month before getting hurt

I’ve done a few different types of runs in the Mizuno Wave Sky 3, including speedwork, long runs, and easy runs and I’ve found it to be best for easy runs.

Mizuno Wave Sky 3 Conclusion:

I am pleasantly surprised by the Mizuno Wave Sky 3 and I will continue to wear it until I’ve used the life up. The Mizuno Wave Sky 3 has quickly become one of my favorite shoes and I appreciate the cushion for easy runs days.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Mizuno Rider Waveknit 3New Balance 1080 v10Diadora Mythos Blushield Blushield Hip 5, Hoka One One Arahi 4Asics Cumulus 21

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: Brooks Ricochet 2 Shoe ReviewNew Balance FuelCell RebelAltra Escalante 2.0, Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport.

Questions for you:

Have you tried Mizuno before?

What is your favorite running shoe? 

 

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Brooks Levitate 3 Review Shoe Review
Gear Review, Running

Brooks Levitate 3 Shoe Review

The Brooks Levitate 3 Shoe Review

The Brooks Levitate 3 Quick Facts:

Heel to Toe Drop: 8 mm

Weight: 10.3 ounces

Brooks Levitate 3 Review Shoe Review

The Brooks Levitate 3 Fit:

Compared to the original Brooks Levitate, the Brooks Levitate 2 went through a significant change with the fit with a redesigned knit upper. Between the two models, the sock liner came up higher and it fit much differently than the first version of the Brooks Levitate.  The upper of the third version is similar to the second. According to Brooks, the Brooks Levitate 3 has a plush interior liner that optimizes fit and in shoe comfort.

The Brooks Levitate 3 fits similar to the Brooks Levitate 2 with a secure sock like fit. Brooks listened to the feedback of the jagged back cutting through people’s ankles. The Brooks Levitate 3 has a much softer back and heel counter a lighter and softer feel to it.

The pseudo integrated tongue provides a secure fit without ripping into the ankles. The wraparound integrated collar treats the shoe as more like a sock fit that moves with your gait. I still wish they got rid of the higher flat knit upper all together. I think it’s a bold leap that hasn’t always won over runners (myself included).

The new Brooks Levitate 3 features a redesigned knit upper, a more padded heel collar and more secure tongue which moves with your foot.

Brooks Levitate 3 Review Shoe Review

Other than that, the fit of the Brooks Levitate 3 is an improvement from the Brooks Levitate 2. The heel and collar are more padded.  Typically I wear between a 10-11 wide in running shoes and I’ve found the 10.5 to be a good fit. (The Brooks Levitate 3 is not made it wide).

Brooks Levitate 3 Review Shoe Review

Brooks Levitate 3 Ride:

Unlike many Brooks shoes, the Brooks Levitate is a more bouncy and as Brooks says “energetic ride.” If you are looking for a Brooks shoe more responsive than the Brooks Ghost 12 or Brooks Glycerin, the Brooks Levitate 3 is that.

The Brooks Levitate 3 is meant to be a springy shoe that returns energy with every stride.  Unlike most Brooks models, the Brooks Levitate 3 uses DNA Amp cushioning material, which makes it more firm and responsive. Plus, according to Brooks, the DNA AMP midsole technology cushioning material doesn’t break down as quickly as other running foams.

Brooks Levitate 3 Review Shoe Review

The bottoms of the Brooks Levitate 3 now has a forward arrow point pattern of flex grooves. This allows you to move from heel to toe quickly and more efficiently.

I’ve run a variety of workouts in the Brooks Levitate 3 from speed work to shorter runs, to longer faster runs, as well as easy runs. For me, I think it fits nicely into a quicker long run category. There is enough cushion for those longers runs without feeling beat up afterward.  It’s not light enough (for me) to feel fast doing traditional track or speed work in.

Brooks Levitate 3 Review Shoe Review

Brooks Levitate 3 Conclusion:

I think the Brooks Levitate 3 update is better than the Brooks Levitate 2, but still not as good as the first version. I’ll continue to run it and I didn’t have any issues with it cutting my heel this time around. I prefer the softness of either the Brooks Ghost or Brooks Glycerin 17 before the firmness of the Brooks Levitate 3 running shoes, but the update is good.  The Brooks Levitate 3 is better than the Brooks Levitate 2 but still not as good (in my opinion) as the original.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Diadora Mythos Elite TRX, Hoka Bondi 6, Saucony Triumph 17

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell Rebel, Brooks Levitate 3, Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

What is your favorite running sh0e?

Hae you tried the Brooks Levitate 3?

Saucony Triumph 17 Shoe Review
Gear Review, Running

Saucony Triumph 17 Shoe Review

Saucony Triumph 17 Shoe Review

Let me cut to the chase here. The Saucony Triumph 17 has gone through a massive update. Usually, when people come to the store and ask: “has the updated version of my shoe changed much,” the answer is no. The Saucony Triumph 17 is completely redesigned (along with many Saucony shoes coming out). It’s not changed in a bad way, but it’s very different than the last five years of ISO and everun models.

What’s new with the Saucony Triumph 17?

Big things. The cushioning has changed from “everun midsole” to “PWRRUN+ midsole.” What is “PWRRUN”? According to Saucony, it’s lighter and softer.

Saucony Triumph 17 Quick Facts:

Weight: 9.2 oz

Heel to Toe Drop: 8 mm

Saucony Triumph 17 Fit:

Like many running shoes, the Saucony Triumph 17 engineered mesh upper is soft, seamless, and flexible. If you have bunions or a wider forefront, your feet don’t rub. The Saucony Triumph has had a more freeing upper compared to other brands. This hasn’t changed and there isn’t a lot of structure in the Saucony Triumph 17 upper.

The massive change is that the Saucony Triumph 17 no longer uses the ISO fit. It’s gone back to regular shoelaces. I’ve worn the Saucony Triumph since the original model of the ISO. (The Saucony Triumph ISO was the best version of this shoe and I still stand by that). The formfit acts like a luxurious bucket seat to holds the foot into place. I’ve worn anywhere between a 10-10.5 wide and the 10.5 wide seems to fit the best this version.

Saucony Triumph 17 Shoe Review

Saucony Triumph 17 Ride:

Since the Saucony Triumph 17 no longer uses everun, the ride will feel different. The new PWRRUN+ midsole makes the Saucony Triumph 25% lighter and much softer. It feels like a higher cushioned shoe. With the everun, the Saucony Ride and the Saucony Triumph began feeling too similar. Why pay for the Saucony Triumph when the $120 felt basically the same? Now, there is a separation and you can feel that soft cushion in the Saucony Triumph.

The PWRRUN+ has a springy and responsive underfoot feel but also allows you to finish a run strong and feeling fresh. With the amount of cushion in the Saucony Triumph, you don’t feel beat up.

The traction of the Saucony Triumph 17 is great. There is plenty of crystalized rubber and with the rubber outsole hard to lose traction in an inclement weather day.

I’ve run easy runs, long runs, and a workout. I feel (for me), the Saucony Triumph 17 works best as an easy run shoe.

Saucony Triumph 17 Shoe Review

Saucony Triumph 17 Conclusion:

The Saucony Triumph 17 has changed a lot. It’s lighter and softer than everun. It’s a good shoe, but it is very different than previous models. I like it and I’m glad Saucony has updated it.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Diadora Mythos Elite TRX, Hoka Bondi 6, Saucony Triumph 17

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

Hae you tried the Saucony Triumph 17? 

What is your favorite shoe? 

 

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review
Gear Review, Running

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review

The Diadora Mythos Elite TRX is a newly updated shoe from Diadora. For many, Diadora is an unfamiliar brand. If you played soccer, you’d know Diadora is an Italian company that once specialized in both soccer and lifestyle shoes. A few years ago, Diadora moved into running shoes and done a great job. The plush cushioning in their models has been well received.  Plus, many of their models are “only” updated every 18 months to 2 years. Finally, the United States Headquarters is in Philadelphia, which I can appreciate.

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Quick Facts:

Heel to Toe Drop: 10 mm

Weight: 10.2 oz

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Fit:

The brand, Diadora, is a wider last shoe altogether. If your feet are wider, it might be a good brand to look into. Many of their models are roomy enough to go down a half size. I don’t because it’s not enough space for me, but many people do. The  Diadora Mythos Elite TRX has a contoured footbed that cradles and guides the foot in a neutral path.

Typically in running shoes, I wear a size 10-11 wide. In the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX, I find a size 10 to be most appropriate.

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Ride:

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX uses a new concept in running technology. It gives you support when you need it and not when you don’t need it. The Diadora Mythos Elite TRX simulates the presence of a traditional medial side dual-density system and achieves the same end result by the subtraction of the section on the lateral side.

For instance, say one of your feet pronates and the other does not, the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX will give support to the foot that needs it but will remain neutral for those who don’t. Similar to the once-beloved Nike Lunarglide. Come to think of it; if you were ever a Nike Lunarglide fan, the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX is a shoe to look into.

Blushield technology allows neutral runners to stay neutral, but those were needing stability to get that as well. Theoretically, anyone can run in the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX. Do I quite believe “anyone can run in the shoe,” no, but it will provide support if you need it and not if you don’t.

I’ve run in the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX for several different runs, including workouts, long runs, and easy runs. With the amount of cushion in the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX, I prefer the shoe for easy runs.

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Shoe Review

Diadora Mythos Elite TRX Conclusion:

I like the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX and it’s a great trainer for easy runs or recovery runs. The extra cushion during training feels great during recovery runs. If you are looking for a new brand to try, Diadora is a great option. Plus, they sponsor a couple of local races, including the New Jersey Marathon and Philly 10k.  The Diadora Mythos Elite TRX is exclusively available in run specialty. If you are local, I know RunningCo. of Haddonfield, Philly Runner, North Wales Running Company, and Runners High all carry the Diadora Mythos Elite TRX.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Diadora Mythos Elite TRX, Hoka Bondi 6,  Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

Hae you tried Diadora?

What is your favorite recovery day trainer?

 

The anatomy of a running shoe
Gear Review, Reads, Running, Running Reads

The Anatomy of a Running Shoe

The Anatomy of a Running Shoe:

The anatomy of a running shoe is a post I’ve wanted to write for a while.

The anatomy of a running shoe

Since I write a shoe review most weeks, it occurred to me that many people didn’t realize what the actual parts that made up a running shoe are. No shame in that; your only job is to make sure the shoe feels good when you wear it.  It is easier to describe what you like or don’t like in a shoe if you know a few basic terms.

Pictured is the New Balance 1500 (a racing flat ideal for 5ks to marathons)

Anatomy of a running shoe

The “Upper”: 

The upper part of a shoe is exactly what it sounds like: the top of the shoe.  These days, most brands use an upper made of lightweight, breathable, engineered mesh. Although some uppers are made from leather or suede too. Some shoes are even waterproof and the upper can keep water out while still keeping it breathable.

Now, most uppers are seamless, so it doesn’t rub against a wider forefront or bunion. The upper and the shoelaces help secure the foot.  The upper protects your feet and is also what helps keep dirt, rocks or debris out of a shoe.

The anatomy of a running shoe

Toe Box:

The toe box of a running shoe is generally the widest part of the shoe and where your feet and toes are located. You always want movement in the toebox and don’t want your feet to feel squished.

You should be able to wiggle your toes before and after a run comfortably. There should also be about the width of your thumbs length from your longest toe (even if your longest toe is your second or third toe). Having the extra space helps reduce the loss of toenails and keeps your feet from going numb.

Also Included in the Upper Anatomy of a Running Shoe:

Shoe Laces: Shoelaces or Velcro are what hold the top of your foot securely into place. This portion of the shoe is one of the most important for fit in the anatomy of a running shoe.

Tongue: Many people don’t realize the tongue has a purpose! It protects the top of your foot from the pressure of shoelaces but also prevents debris from getting inside.

Heel counter: The heel counter is the firm cup in the back of your shoe to secure your heel. The heel counter makes sure your foot doesn’t slide around. It’s essential always to untie your shoes so you don’t damage the heel counter. Damaging it will bend the plastic and can cause Achilles tendon issues.

Midsole:

The midsole of a running shoe is located between the outsole and the upper. The upper is attached to the midsole of the shoe. Currently, the majority of midsoles are made of a foam called EVA (called ethyl vinyl acetate). Each brand uses different cushioning or EVA that they deem “the best.”

Outsole:

The outsole is a critical component of running shoes, especially when running in inclement weather. The outside is what provides traction on the roads. In trail shoes, the outsole is often thicker to offer more traction. Each brand has different traction in grooves to protect the feet.

Most road shoes are made from blown rubber, which is softer and more flexible. A trail shoe is usually more rigid and is often made of carbon rubber to keep it stiff.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Medial Post:

Not every shoe has a medial post or stability piece to it. Many do, but not all. Most running shoes fall into one of the following combinations: motion control, neutral shoes, or stability shoes. Motion control shoes are designed with the most support, where neutral have zero support. (They can have cushion, but keep in mind support does equal cushion).Stability helps keep a collapsed arch propped in or someone who pronates back into neutral.

The medial post is one of the most important components to determining if a shoe will work for you. If you need a lot of stability and the shoe is neutral, chances are it won’t work. Not everyone needs medial support and using a shoe that has support when you don’t need it can lead to other issues. Most stability components of a shoe are made out of a dual-density combination of TPU (thermoplastic urethane) and EVA.

Not all stability pieces are the same. Some shoes provide minor stability where some is much more corrective. Each brand and each shoe within a brand are different.

The Shank:

Many people don’t even realize a running shoe “shank” exists. The shank is what controls the flexion and torsion of a shoe. It helps the bend naturally and helps with a smooth transition from heel to toe.  The stiffer the shank, the less the shoe will flex.

Heel Drop:

One of the most common questions in the running world, is what a shoe heel to toe drop? I wrote a newsletter on it a few months ago. In short, the heel to toe drop is the height of the heel minus the height of the forefront (in millimeters). For example, a zero drop shoe (like the brand Altra) has the same height and cushion in the heel as the forefront. Most traditional shoes have between 10-12 mm.

Thicker heels will usually cause your heel to drop and hit the ground first, whereas a thinner heel will be easier to run more on your forefront. There is no right or wrong heel drop in the anatomy of a running shoe but it takes trial and error to figure out what works best for you.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Last:

When it comes to last, not every brand is the same. The last of the shoe is essentially the shape of the shoe. Most running shoe lasts curved, but shoe lasts can be curved, semi-curved, or straight. If you flip over and look at your Brooks shoe, you can see it curves in the front, pinches in the middle, and curves out in the back. Most traditional running shoes are semi-curved. Finding a last that matches the shape of your foot is just as important as finding a shoe that matches your needs structurally. In the anatomy of a running shoe, the last is what will help find the correct fit.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Why is the Anatomy of a Running Shoe Important for Runners?

Knowing the anatomy of a running shoe because you can find the shoe that works for you both structural and by shape. At the end of the day, you want to find the shoe you are most comfortable in.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport.

Questions for you:

What is your favorite shoe? Why? 

Were you familiar with the anatomy of a running shoe?