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Training: Recovery and Turkey Trot

Last weeks training was spent relaxing after the Philadelphia Half Marathon and preparing for the yearly Turkey Trot.

me running

Since I didn’t run at 100% at Philadelphia, I felt as though physically I recovered decently to race last Thursday.  Mentally, not as much, but from a physical standpoint, I felt decent for the turkey trot on Thanksgiving.

Monday: Easy 45 minutes
Tuesday: Short hike in North Jersey
Wednesday: Easy 60 minutes
Thursday: Turkey Trot 5k (19:02)
Friday: Easy 45 minutes
Saturday: Easy 60 minutes
Sunday 14 miles/6.5 7:23 pace

Thoughts:

In all, I feel good about the week.  My food poisoning still has me feeling more tired, but on Sunday I was able to finish 14 miles and not be sick (unlike Philadelphia haha).  I’m now 21 days (out of a possible 70) from initially coming down with the disease.

While I am starting to feel better and I don’t feel like I’m going to be sick as frequently, but I do feel more tired all of the time.  After the half marathon, I did increase the dosage to the recommended amount of antibiotics (I was taking a half dose).

Turkey Trot: (19:02)

I’ll have a full recap tomorrow, but I was thankful to run with a good friend of mine who pushed me along the way.  We also ran part of Philadelphia together.  I didn’t feel great, but I was happy with how I ran for the day.  I’ve had a hard time not comparing myself to times I was running in October, but I know once I feel better I’ll be back down to where I was.  I had a great time as always at the Turkey Trot, and it’s one of my favorite races of the year.

Posts from the week:
Philadelphia Half Marathon Recap
Hiking 7 Bridges (Colorado Springs)
Visiting the Grand Canyon

Questions for you;
Did you race on Thanksgiving?
How do you recover from races?

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Philadelphia Half Marathon (1:27.57)

I wrote about 1000 words recapping the Philadelphia Half Marathon.  Then I forgot to save it…not the first time this has happened.

Most people know, but food poisoning prevented me from having the “race of my life”.   I raced with how I felt for the day, and that is all I can ask from myself.  I’m not disappointed, in fact, I’m thankful I finished injury free.

I should rewind.  For the last two weeks, I’ve been suffering from food poisoning.  I’m not violently vomiting, however, I’m often tired and I never feel “great” or like myself.  Occasionally at night, I’ll feel extremely sick.

I contracted it coming home from vacation.  The first night home, I spent violently getting sick.  It was bad enough, we thought maybe my appendix had burst.  After getting some tests done, I found out I had food poisoning.  As I mentioned, it isn’t the typical “24-hour bug” but can stay in your system for about 70 days.  Not violently vomiting for 70 days but more tired, just not feeling great.

The doctor told me I could run, but I might feel sick.  From that day until the Philadelphia half marathon, I had 13 days.  During that time period, I ran 2 5ks and a few runs.  I never puked during any runs, but I did feel like I was in a “funk.”

The problem was, I ran most of my mileage untimed and easy.  That’s not necessarily a problem, except running easy miles is very different than running a fast half marathon.  My stomach showed me that very quickly.

I didn’t have a goal at Philadelphia.  I’ve never run particularly well, in fact, my fastest time was from the only other time I’ve had food poisoning (a completely different strain). Then last year I felt like garbage.  I live about 10 miles from Center City, and while I can’t say I even “love” the race, I seem to just keep signing up.

And so here we are year 3 of running the Philadelphia half.

Like many race days, I slept in later than anticipated.  It wasn’t an issue, and my husband and I arrived to Philadelphia, parked, and stood in line at security around 6:30.  The security to get into the race is lengthy, and we waited about 40 minutes.  It left us with 20 minutes to drop off bags and use the bathroom.  It was probably not enough time, and we made into the corral at 7:28.  My good friend, Erin, thought I decided to DNS considering we basically had to beg security to reopen the corral.

The race went off, and Erin, my husband, and I started together.  Erin and I ran the Atlantic City half, and we had discussed possibly running Philly together.  The first mile went out fast. I chatted with Erin and my husband, and we hit the first mile around 6:45.  I felt decent, but I also wasn’t sure how I would feel later on.

The first few miles of the race are the fastest and easiest.  We ran mile 2 in 6:17 and 3 in 6:27.  The pace didn’t feel uncomfortable, and I was able to mumble a few words.

Around the 5k, I noticed my husband getting a bit antsy.  I knew he was going to drop me.  I also knew we would still be married either way at the finish line and I was happy he was feeling good.  He hasn’t raced a lot of half marathons since his 1:20 PR, so it was motivating to see him pick it up.  I had no energy to keep up though.

At mile 4, I ran into Alana who is gearing up for the CIM.  We ultimately ran a good portion of the race together with Erin.  I ran mile 5 in 6:37 and 6 in 6:43.  Around the halfway point, my stomach started to hurt.  Not like use the bathroom hurt, but like I might puke hurt.  I thought it might have been not interacting well the Gatorade (I’ve never had an issue before) but realized the doctor was right.

I began scanning the course for a restroom to vomit.  Then, of course, I saw no less than 5 of my good friends or people who have come into work.  I gave a wincing smile, while also not trying to puke on them.

Somewhere between mile 9-10, I found a bathroom and vomited.  It wasn’t a huge vomit, but breakfast and Gatorade came up.  For about 10 seconds I thought, should I just stop?  I stood straight and didn’t feel awful, so I quickly exited the bathroom.  I think the situation lasted all of 30 seconds to a minute.  I still saw Alana and everyone else ahead, so I knew I had not gotten that far.

I told myself if you need to stop…you need to stop.  No one cares if you cross the finish line.  No one cares about your pace, time, or speed.  We climbed a few hills and I didn’t feel as bad.  As weird as it sounds, after that stop I felt as though I was finding my groove.

Around mile 11, I saw Philadelphia in the distance.  I told myself 2 miles.  20 minutes and you’ll be chillin’ (a real thought I had).  Due to delusion and downhill, I crushed mile 11 in 6:25.  Somehow I found myself running entirely alone for the final mile.  I saw both Alana and Erin within the minute ahead, and I was just…alone.  I seem to always find the pocket of running by myself in big races.

I crossed the finish in 1:27.57 and I was shocked.  A week ago, I wasn’t sure I would run.  In the early parts of the race, I believed a 1:30 might be doable.  (I told Erin it was my goal).  While I know I’m in much better fitness than a 1:28, you must race for how you feel for the day.  Whether that is good or bad.  I’m happy I finished and even finished strong, though I know it was probably not my smartest move.

tim and I philadelphia half

That was my last planned half marathon for the year.  I’m looking forward to shorter things while my food poisoning clears up.  As I mentioned in my training log, it could last up to 70 days (I’m on 17 now?).

Questions for you:
Have you had food poisoning before?
Have you stopped during a race before?
Postive Question: How was your Thanksgiving?

Run the Runway 5k (20:54)

Run the Runway 5k (20:54)

Last weekend my husband decided to do a 5k that started and ended on a runway.  When you think of a runway, you think of a flat, straight, wide piece of road and for the most part that is true. At major airports they are flat but small, local, airports might have a few inclines on the taxiway.  “Lucky for us,” this was not the flattest runway out there.  But that’s fine, just a surprise.

We saw the race earlier in the week but wanted to play it by ear.  Neither of us knew how we would feel (especially me).  The night before we decided we would do it.  Of course, I “slept in” until 5:30 when we needed to be out the door by 6.  After scrambling around and making breakfast, we were out.  That was a miracle by itself.

We arrived around 7, signed up and did about 2-mile warm up on the runway.  We noticed the taxiway (not the actual runway piece) had a bit of incline.  It didn’t matter much to me since I wasn’t looking for a showstopping PR.  Just to run faster than normal.

The race started at sharply at 8, and we went off.  The first mile went the same way we had warmed up with a few small inclines.  We turned around and headed down the half mile runway (which was completely flat and straight).  Since you could see everything, the race felt like it was taking forever.  I kept looking at my watch thinking “why haven’t I reached the first mile.”  I ran a 6:25 which felt as though I was working much harder than that.

The second mile left the runway and went up a steep hill on the local road.  I had thought the entire race was on a runway so wasn’t expecting to have any significant hills.  I powered up the hills but was running alone for most of the race.  During the second mile, I was running alone.  There were plenty of people ahead of me (including my husband) and plenty of people behind, but no one with me.  I focused on the people about 30 seconds ahead and wanted to pass them. I hit the next mile in 6:36.  I thought perhaps I could run a flat mile and break 20 minutes if the course was a perfect 3.1.  Neither of which happened.

Run the runway 5k me

During the third mile, we wrapped along the local roads and headed back on the runway.  Half of the mile was hilly and the other half was flat and straight.  Around 2.6, we headed back towards the finish.  Since it was a runway, you could see the finish line from that point forward.  I thought it might never come.  I powered through the third mile in 6:33 and the finished the race in 20:54.  I believe the race was a little long (maybe about a tenth) but no big deal (which I think they had mentioned beforehand).  My husband finished in 18:22, which was decent for him on a long course.

Run the runway 5k me

As I went to cool down, I promptly tripped and fell.  I have a bunch of surface wounds on my knee, elbow, and shoulder which are more obnoxious than anything.  Luckily it’s not a running injury, just as a nasty surface wound. The staff was friendly and cleaned and bandaged me up.  We cooled down and watched the airshow for a bit, which was fun!

Thoughts:

The first race back is humbling and adding a fall made even more so. I’m happy with my results, and I’m hoping I’ll be able to consistently build upon my results.  I don’t plan to integrate a lot of speed workouts right now but find local 5ks for speed.  That was my plan in June, but life took over.  I can’t say I’ll absolutely have the time to train but I do believe I’ll have more time this fall.

Questions for you:

Have you ever run a race on a runway? 

Do you like flat races or hilly?

I like hilly half marathons but flat 5ks.

Training Update: More Reflecting than Training

Training Update: More Reflecting than Training

Last week a combination of life and reflection happened.  I realized I am diving too quickly into training.  This post is lengthy and more of a reflection than a training post.  If you want the training side: I ran 25 easy, uneventful, miles.

If you want the reflection side…here we go.

As funny as it sounds, I’m not as young as I used to be and also not a new runner.  Due to my awkward form, I’m more susceptible to injury too.  I’m not sure why I thought increasing mileage and adding racing was a good idea but it’s not.

Unsurprisingly from jumping into training too quickly, everything feels achy.  While I could continue to increase mileage, I would probably increase those aches.  Running is funny that you think you can get away with things…sometimes you can, but 99% of the time it humbles you later.

Right now, nothing is injured but quite frankly I don’t feel good running. I have a gut feeling I would get injured soon if I didn’t change something. I’ve decided to actually go about getting back into running the smart way. 

How will I do that?

Instead of increasing mileage, I’m going to keep my mileage low.  In fact, I’m not going to race again for a few weeks.   Currently, I am achy, tight and sore, plus I don’t feel great.

I would like to be glamorous and say I’m coming back from my running break well but the truth is, I’m not.  That’s fine and I’m not upset about it.  Last week, I wrote a post about coming back easy and not comparing yourself to anyone (including yourself).  If I can’t take my own advice, I have no business writing posts about it.

I’ve also been talking to one of my post-collegiate coaches and mentors frequently.  While running with him a while ago, I ran well (in the 2012-2013 time frame).  Life happened and I moved 4 times in 2014 and didn’t run very competitively either.  After that, I remained coachless until last year.

We have been talking more regularly the last few weeks, and he suggested taking 2 weeks off and using the antigravity treadmill, and building mileage from there.

He also knows my early running history better than anyone (and knows my history now too).  While I don’t need a coach right now, I am talking to him consistently and would like to give credit.  When I’m looking for a structured plan, he will probably be the first person I will seek (and he knows that, so thanks Jim 🙂

On the personal life side, for the rest of June and possibly even July, my life is going to get extremely busy.  Due to my husband’s job, it’s not something I can talk about online and will never be able too.  I will still work regularly at my running store job but will be doing a lot more again outside of that. I don’t like vague blogging, but saying “I’m busy” will have to suffice.  ETA: I’m excited about this change and no one is forcing me to do anything.   

That being said, this summer probably won’t be the summer of hard training.  I won’t say definitely not, but I doubt I will train and run hard. It will make my running blog more boring because I’ll be running and racing far less (if any).  Heck, I don’t even have children or pets to talk about. I’ll run when I have time, but with the summer heat, my only time might be a quick hour in the middle of the day (in that case, I won’t run or run on the antigravity treadmill).   If I’m going to run on a treadmill at all, might as well as be in style right?

For the first time in a while, I am 100% okay with not training seriously.  Six months ago if I had been thrown the same situation, I would have begun to stress out with cramming runs into that situation.  Right now, I’m okay with not getting into serious training right now.

Below is last week of running.  It doesn’t feel like a lot but to be honest, it’s probably the most I’ll log outdoors for a while.

Monday: Easy 5 miles
Tuesday: OFF
Wednesday: Easy 5 miles
Thursday: Easy 5 miles
Friday: Easy 5 miles
Saturday: OFF
Sunday: Easy 5 miles

Total: 25 miles

So yes that was a lot of life updates.  If you just scrolled to the bottom: you missed that I’m backing off running seriously for a while, ran 25 miles last week, and going to be busy for the next 2 months.  I’ll still blog and I’ll still run but probably nothing more than 5-6 miles and minimal if any racing.

Posts from the Week:

The Importance of Easing Back into Training

HT 3.9 (26:12) miler Race Recap

Questions for you:

Are you training for anything?

When is your favorite time to run?

Training: April

It’s hard to believe April has already flown by.  Regarding running, April started off ok then progressively went downhill, and ended up that needed and wanted a full break from running.

april fools half marathon atlantic city me running

Miles Run: 228
Range of Paces: 5:54-10:04-untimed
Races: 3
Workouts: 4
Rest Days: 9 (and counting)
Longest Run: Atlantic City Half Marathon
Shortest Run: 2 miles 

Races:
Phillies 5k (18:32)
Clean Air 5kish
April Fools Half Marathon (1:26.17)

Favorite Race:
Phillies 5k
phillies 5k win

Favorite Workout:
None

Thoughts:
The month of April started off well.  Even though I didn’t PR at the Phillies 5k, I ran moderately well.  It was by far my favorite race.

As the month continued, I became more and more burnt out from running.  It wasn’t just April that burnt me out but training over the last 6.  After Atlantic City on April 23rd, I decided to take rest and rebuild my mental attitude.  I don’t hate running, but I wasn’t enjoying it as much, and I never broke through my plateau.

Thanks to my friend Paul for these photos

May:
I don’t know what May will bring.  I hope I’ll be ready to run again.  While I haven’t run or really worked out since last weekend but I do plan to do more cross training and get back to the gym.

Running Posts from April:
Running Related Posts
How to Prepare for Running in the Heat
Should You Wear Running Shoes Outside of Running?
How to Transition into Minimalist Running Shoes

Shoe Reviews:
Asics Nimbus 19 Shoe Review
Brooks Glycerin 14 Shoe Review

Questions for you:

How was your month of training?

What is your favorite cross training activity?

Running Related Posts

Running Related Posts

Recently a reader sent an email and asked if I could put together a list of articles I’ve written recently about running shoes and training.  Thinking out loud, none of the articles are “new”, but it makes a lot of sense to have them all compiled into one spot.

Instead of doing a Running Store post this week, I thought I would get all of the posts together in one spot.  As always, if you have a question about shoes, the running store, or anything else feel free to ask.  I’m not an expert or professional but I do like running and working in a running store.

Recent Shoe Reviews:

Adidas Energy Boost
Adidas Supernova

Asics Nimbus 19

Brooks Ghost 9
Brooks Glycerin 14
Brooks Launch 4

Hoka Clifton 3
Hoka Bondi 5 

New Balance Zante

Saucony Freedom ISO
Saucony Zealot ISO 2

Important Shoe Related Topics:

There is no Perfect Running Shoe

Running Shoe Reviews Are (Mostly) Worthless

Running Shoe Specific Topics:

Five Secrets about Buying Running Shoes
How Alternating Shoes Can Benefit Your Running
Should You Wear Running Shoes Outside of Running?
Should You Race in Racing Flats?
How to Transition into Minimalist Running Shoes

Training Posts:

Are Losing Toenails a Runners Rite of Passage?
How to Prepare for Running in the Heat: 
Why 5ks are the Best
How to Race Well
How to Race in Unfavorable Conditions
How to Run in the Heat

Running and Nutrition:

Protein and Running

Other:

Thoughts While Working in a Running Store

There you have it!  As always if you have any questions or comments, feel free to ask.  I’ve gotten a couple questions regarding nutrition (something I’m still trying to figure out) as well as fun things to do outside of running that I’ll be chatting about soon too!

Questions for you:

What is a fun fact about your job?

What is one thing you enjoy about the sport of running?

Clean Air 5k (19:50)

I wasn’t supposed to run this race.  In fact, until about 2 hours before, I had planned to drive up 90 minutes North to a different race.  Sometimes life happens, and I wasn’t able too.  Which is unfortunate because I had actually signed up for the original race too!

I knew about the Clean Air 5k/10k plus a good friend of mine, Noelle, was running.  When I realized I wasn’t able to drive north, I decided to leech on with her and go into Philadelphia.  She was running the 10k, but I figured the 5k was enough for me.

The course itself was a simple out and back on the Schuylkill River.  In fact, it was the exact place I set my 5k PR last year.

Noelle and I warmed up, and I knew I didn’t feel great. Of course, the weather was pretty much ideal, and I felt like garbage.

The 5k started 15 minutes after the 10k, so I waited around and then lined up.  All of a sudden we were off.

As I settled into racing, I saw a huge pack of men and women taking off out in front.  To be honest, I was surprised the 5k was so competitive, but you never know who will show up.

I found my groove and hit the first mile in 5:57.  I knew I wouldn’t be able to hold that pace.  My calves were stiff, and I just didn’t feel good.  Not every race can be your best, and I figured quickly this was not going to be great.

Thanks to my friend Paul for these photos

The next mile began weaving through the 10k walkers.  I felt as though I couldn’t get any momentum because I was going around and weaving.  We hit the 180-degree turn around mile 1.6, and at that point, I knew the course would probably be long.

As I headed back towards back to Philadelphia, I caught one woman.  From someone watching the races, it was probably easy to see who was running which race. However, when you are racing it’s hard to pay attention to multiple people going different paces.  I hit mile 2 around 6:07 and just focused on the finish.

The third mile was rough, and I just wanted the race to be over.  I didn’t regret running, but I was riding the pain train home.  During the third mile, a woman passed me and tried to motivate me to hang with her.  As much as I wanted to keep up, it wasn’t in the cards, and she took over fourth place.

The last half mile was spent trying to get home.  When I crossed the third mile in 6:09, I knew there was no way it would be an accurate course.  I finished up with 3.25 miles in 19:50 and overall pace of 6:05.  That would equate out to an 18:45 5k which is about what I’ve been running.  A little bit slower on an easier course, but I felt more fatigued.clean air 5k

Thoughts:

I can’t say I’m happy about the time, course or how the events that morning played out but some days are like that.  I’m proud I still competed, and I had an enjoyable time with friends.  Plus it’s nice not to race in pouring rain.

Noelle and I post race

Questions for you:

What was the last morning things didn’t go as planned?

Have you ever raced a long course?

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