Brooks Glycerin 14 Shoe Review

The Brooks Glycerin 14 is the most cushioned neutral shoe that Brooks currently offers.  I’ve reviewed both the Brooks Ghost 9 as well as the Brooks Launch 3 and Brooks Launch 4.

As most people have noticed, lately I’ve been doing most of my training in Brooks.  I’m not paid or an ambassador.  Recently, I have found the fit of Brooks to match my foot well.

A while ago, I ran a minimal amount in the Brooks Glycerin 12, and I liked them.   For no reason, I just haven’t run in them since.  I’ve wanted to try the Glycerin again but for whatever reason, haven’t.

The Brooks Glycerin 14 is similar to the 13.  The majority of the update came with the fit of the upper, and it fits wider than the previous model.

Fit:

The upper is seamless which means it’s able to fit wider feet as well as it doesn’t press against bunions.  A lot of running shoes are going towards seamless uppers.  Being seamless, allows for an overall more comfortable fit.

A smooth mesh allows for a “socklike” fit with plenty of breathing room.  Compared to the Glycerin 13 upper, the mesh feels more durable too.

Speaking of the mesh, something unique about the Glycerin is the mesh is much thinner. I have found it to dry much quicker than many other shoes.  Considering most of March was pouring rain in New Jersey this was extremely helpful.

Typically I wear a size 10 or 10 wide in running shoes and have found the 10 wide to be the best fit.

Brooks glycerin 14 shoe review

Ride:

The Glycerin has a lot more cushion than the Ghost.  You can feel the cushion under your feet, and it feels like a sponge.  Brookes uses cushioning technology similar to memory foam.  The Brooks Glycerin is definitely the softest traditional shoes I’ve run in for a while.  You feel the extra cushion without the extra weight.

Thoughts:

The Glycerin has been a shoe I’ve wanted to try for a while, and I was pleased to finally give it a shot.  I like the shoe a lot, and I’ll probably keep it in my rotation for a while.  I don’t have any complaints and the Brooks Glycerin 15 comes out soon so I’ll add that into my rotation too.

Pros:

  • High Cushion and Soft
  • Seamless Upper
  • Updating soon so will be on sale

Cons:

  • Price ($150)
  • More narrow than many other Brooks Shoes
  • Brooks glycerin 14 shoe review

My Current Running Shoe Rotation:
Brooks Glycerin
Brooks Launch 4 (short runs, workouts)
Saucony Freedom (daily runs)
Hoka Bondi 5 (daily runs, recovery runs)
Saucony Type A (speed work)

Questions for you:
What are your favorite shoes right now?
Do you prefer more or less cushion when it comes to running shoes?

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Training: Off Weeks

Last week’s training didn’t go as anticipated.  Most of the Northeast got a huge heat wave, and while I’m thankful for it, my body didn’t adjust well.  Plus around Thursday-Friday, I started to feel somewhat sick.  Essentially last week, running was put on the backburner.  I had time to run, but I didn’t make it my priority.  I managed to run most days but quality miles? Eh, I’m not so sure about.

Monday: Easy Run
Tuesday: 1 hour Easy Run
Wednesday: Workout
Thursday: Rest
Friday: 1 hour Easy Run
Saturday: 1 hour easy Easy Run
Sunday: 45 minutes tempo (7:30)
Total:  60 miles

Wednesday’s Workout:
1X25 minutes (goal 6:46…actual 7:15)
2X2 miles (goal 6:23…actual 6:55)
2X3 minutes (goal 5:53…actual 6:58)

This workout didn’t go well. I’m not sure whether it was my body or the fact that I was probably at the early stages of a stomach bug but no part that felt good minus I was injury free.  I left the workout feeling bummed and disappointed with myself.  After throwing a pity party for a few minutes, I put the workout in my rearview mirror and focused on another day.  It stinks to be so far off an interval but sometimes that is life.  Lately, I’ve had more of those workouts lately than I care too.

Due to the weather on Sunday, I changed my tempo pace.  It was 85 degrees when I started, and I still wasn’t feeling great.  Even though it was extremely far off of any true tempo pace, I made it through the workout.  The first workout in heat always wipes me out and spent the rest of the afternoon watching Netflix and rehydrating.

Thoughts:
Obviously, this wasn’t a finer workout week for me.  As someone who blogs primarily about running,  it can be daunting to write a post about having a bad week…but it happens.  Every runner, elite, midpacker or beginner has bad weeks of workouts.  The most important part is I’m injury free and just trying to chug along.

Next week is the April Fools (Atlantic City) Half Marathon.  Originally, this was my goal race of the year.  I know the course well and have typically ran well there.  As time gets closer, I don’t feel as though I’m in the same shape as when I’ve set PRs here and my times in the last few months reflect that.  I’ve been bouncing around with several 1:27 half marathons and an outlier 1:23 half in Dallas.  This week is all about recovery, and regardless it will be nice to run one of my favorite races.

Finally, good luck to everyone running and racing Boston!

Posts of the week:
Should You Wear Running Shoes Outside of Running?
Clean Air 5kish (19:50)

Questions for you:
How do you mentally bounce back from a workout?
Did you watch Boston?

Harley Dawn Diner

Earlier in the month, I stopped by the Harley Dawn Diner in Folsom, New Jersey. A few years ago the Harley Dawn closed for construction. They remodeled and rebuilt the entire diner. The new version of the Harley Dawn is more modern than a diner. In fact, if it didn’t have the name finer, you would probably think of it more as a bistro.

Atmosphere: A
The Harley Dawn is modern, with huge windows spanning the entire restaurant. Is a retro metallic, shiny diner? No, but is it a clean, nice looking modern restaurant? Yes.

Harley Dawn Diner

Coffee: A
The Harley Dawn Diner serves locally brewed Lacas coffee. The coffee itself was brewed hot every single time, and the waitress brought plenty of refills. I have no complaints.Harley Dawn Diner

Service: A
When we arrived, we were the only people in the entire diner. I haven’t been the only party in a long time. The waitress was great and refilled our drinks and brought out the food quickly.

Food: C
The unique aspect of the Harley Dawn Diner is everything is locally sourced. Not many diners are like that, and the only other local that comes to mind is the VincentownHarley Dawn Diner

Because of that, they don’t have a huge menu. I wanted to take advantage of locally grown vegetables and ordered the Salmon salad which came on a bed of kale. I asked for a side of pita bread, and she said they didn’t serve pita bread.

Even though the menu was small, it amazed me that there is a diner without pita bread and gyros. I asked for bread, and later the waitress came back and said they were out of homemade bread and offered me a different type. The meal itself was excellent. However, I was disappointed they were out of so many options!

Cost: $
For my local sourced salad and coffee, the cost was $15. That is extremely inexpensive for the quality of food.

Overall thoughts/Would I come back?
I enjoyed the Harley Dawn Diner, and they have a lot of intriguing options I’m interested in, including homemade gelato. I’ll be back again soon. While it’s not a typical New Jersey Diner, it is a good restaurant.

Summary:
Atmosphere: A
Coffee: A
Service: A
Food: C
Cost: $10-15
Overall: B

Closeby Diners I’ve reviewed: Silver Coin Diner, Shore Diner, Palace Diner, Vorhees Diner

Questions for you:
Do you like kale?

Should You Wear Running Shoes Outside of Running?

Another common question we get at my local running store is:

Should you wear running shoes outside of running?

The short answer is: Yes, but they will break down much faster.  There are many articles and blog posts telling you: only wear your shoes for running.  It is definitely true and if you want to save money and the lifespan of the shoe, then you should only wear them for running.

But is there anything wrong with wearing them to do daily activities? No.

Thinking out loud, I use running shoes that already have reached their running life span to walk around in them.  Once I’ve run 300-400 miles in them, they are retired to walking around (or working) shoes.

Here are some things to think about if you wear your shoes outside of running:

Do You Want to Spend a Lot of Money on Shoes?

You can get a cheaper pair of shoes to “kick around and do errands in”.  Heck, most running shoes aren’t the lookers of the shoe world.  It’s easy to find a cuter and more fashionable shoe to walk around in.  Yes, I work at a running store but I’m not going to lie and say running shoes are trendy and cute.  That isn’t their function.

Are You Injured?

Certain injuries need to have a supportive shoe or you cannot get heal.  If you’re suffering from an injury such as plantar fasciitis, you need to be in a well cushioned shoe all of the time to allow healing.  It’s important to have a supportive shoe if you are coming off any injury.

So How do You Know When To Replace When You Use Them all of the Time:

If you do use your running shoes, know that you have to take into account the mileage you wear them outside of running.  You might have only run 20 miles in the shoe, but if you have worn them for 8 hours a day for at work for a week, that is a lot more stress on shoes too.

The lifespan of a shoe depends on several factors:

  • Type of shoe: Minimalist shoes last less time.  It’s less of a shoe.
  • Running Style: If you strike somewhere strongly (whether it’s the heel or the forefront), your shoe is going to last less. This includes myself as I tend to burn through the front of shoes quickly.
  • How Much You Use Them: Think about your running…realistically that is only an hour or two a day. If you are spending 10 hours a day in the same shoe, they are going to last far less time. Gage when to replace your shoes, especially if you regularly run and then head out on errands wearing the same shoes.  If you wear your shoe every day for errands too, it’s going to last about 3 months.

For the most part, shoes last between 300-400 miles.  I always tell people if your legs feel less tired or you are getting aches and pains and haven’t done anything differently, it’s probably the shoes.

The bottom line is: Yes, you can wear your running shoes for everything and it will be more comfortable, however, your shoes will not last as long.
In case you missed any of the previous weeks Running Store and Training:
Thoughts While Working in the Running Store
Should Race in Racing Flats?
Are you Getting Enough Protein for Running?
Why 5ks are the Best
How Alternating Shoes Can Benefit Your Running:
How to Transition in Minimalist Running Shoes
Question for you: Do you wear your running shoes for everything?

Two Years of Marriage

Two years ago was the best day of my life because my husband and I got married.  Everything went perfectly, and there is nothing we would have wanted differently.

As most people know, he is in the military and has been gone for almost exactly one of those years.  While his deployments aren’t long (about 2 months), they are frequent and so are his other trips.  I won’t say it’s been easy and there have been plenty of hard days. I will say we are still as happy as the day we met.

Today I knew today I wanted to post about our anniversary but had no idea what to post.  I finally settled on a “how we met post”.  I’m always interested to see how other people met their significant other so I thought I would share.

So How Did We Meet?

My husband and I met during college cross country season in 2011.  We met at a scrimmage race between our respected two universities.

Tim ended up winning the scrimmage race for men, and I won for females. After the scrimmage, we talked for a while and went on a run a few weeks later.   Cross country season went by, and we still chatted after the season.  During this time, I was coming back from my first serious running injury a tibial stress fracture.  Tim did multiple sports and was getting ready for ski season.  Since cross country was over, and he was no longer running competitively, running at a slower pace didn’t matter.  I was running easy after my injury and he was running easy just to run.

YAY an old school college picture.

Eventually, after several runs, we hung out outside of running. When the semester ended, we both went to our hometowns for winter break. Tim drove down to Virginia Beach and visited for New Years.

Later in the spring, we officially started “officially dating”.  I was blogging at the time, and I don’t think I even mentioned on the blog: OMG you guys, new boy in my life”.  It’s been a theme of the past 6 years, we’ve been happy but he isn’t a large part of the blog.

In May of 2012, we both graduated college and decided to try doing a long distance relationship.  Our options at that point were to try and do a distance relationship or break up.

Tim went to Air Force pilot school in Texas, and I began working in Oswego, NY.  During that time, we both learned a lot about ourselves, interests and hobbies.  We went just over 6 months without seeing each other.  It was one of the hardest times of our relationship but worth it.  The first time we saw each other again was that Thanksgiving, and it was as if nothing had changed.

My first visit to Texas

After Thanksgiving, we saw each other again for Christmas, then in March and in May. It was a lot easier than the first few months.  After nearly a year of distance, we made the decision I would move to Texas. As much as I enjoyed my job in Oswego, I wanted to continue my relationship with Tim and we had to eventually move (he did not have that choice with me).

In Texas, they have these for decoration…
Winning a growler at a half marathon in Texas

Tim graduated his pilot training, and we were told we would be moving to New Jersey. Neither of us knew anything about NJ (except people drive very quickly on the Turnpike) in October 2014.

We’ve now lived in New Jersey 3.5 years and I truly say I love it.  I’ve made incredible friends, I enjoy my job and there is always something to do.  We are only a few miles from Philadelphia and short drive from both of our parents, New York City and Baltimore.

On April 1, 2014, Tim proposed to me.  It was exactly what I wanted, low key and at our house.  We are low key, and I could not have asked for a better proposal.  To be honest, as much as we love running, proposing at a race or in front of hundreds of people is not either of our scene.

 

Engagement photo

Even though we lived in New Jersey, we made the decision to get married in my hometown area in Norfolk, Virginia.  We spent a year wedding planning and got married on April 12, 2015.  While planning a wedding further away was more difficult, it wasn’t as stressful because we both have such supportive and helpful parents.  We couldn’t have dreamed for a better day.

After our wedding, we took a few days to relax and went straight on our honeymoon.  We decided to spend a few days in Key West and go on a cruise in the Carribean.  It was a great vacation, and it was perfect.

Then a few days after we got home, he was deployed for a while.  For the first 6 months of our marriage, he was gone for just over 4.  Afterward, he was home for a bit more, but in the past 2 years, he has been gone for over a year.

Throughout the first two years of marriage, we have learned a lot about ourselves and each other.  Even though I grew up as a military child, being a spouse much different.  It’s not always easy, but the time we do have together makes it worth it.  I’m also thankful for my family and friends who help me get by.

As most people know, he is away now.  We might talk today, we might not.  It doesn’t mean I love my husband any less.  I could not ask for a better person in my life.

Flying together
Hiking Bear Mountain and when we actually saw a bear

Here are some other posts about my husband and I (or just my husband): 
Wedding Post
Honeymoon
Flying Together
Tim’s Recap of the Mercedes Marathon

Clean Air 5k (19:50)

I wasn’t supposed to run this race.  In fact, until about 2 hours before, I had planned to drive up 90 minutes North to a different race.  Sometimes life happens, and I wasn’t able too.  Which is unfortunate because I had actually signed up for the original race too!

I knew about the Clean Air 5k/10k plus a good friend of mine, Noelle, was running.  When I realized I wasn’t able to drive north, I decided to leech on with her and go into Philadelphia.  She was running the 10k, but I figured the 5k was enough for me.

The course itself was a simple out and back on the Schuylkill River.  In fact, it was the exact place I set my 5k PR last year.

Noelle and I warmed up, and I knew I didn’t feel great. Of course, the weather was pretty much ideal, and I felt like garbage.

The 5k started 15 minutes after the 10k, so I waited around and then lined up.  All of a sudden we were off.

As I settled into racing, I saw a huge pack of men and women taking off out in front.  To be honest, I was surprised the 5k was so competitive, but you never know who will show up.

I found my groove and hit the first mile in 5:57.  I knew I wouldn’t be able to hold that pace.  My calves were stiff, and I just didn’t feel good.  Not every race can be your best, and I figured quickly this was not going to be great.

Thanks to my friend Paul for these photos

The next mile began weaving through the 10k walkers.  I felt as though I couldn’t get any momentum because I was going around and weaving.  We hit the 180-degree turn around mile 1.6, and at that point, I knew the course would probably be long.

As I headed back towards back to Philadelphia, I caught one woman.  From someone watching the races, it was probably easy to see who was running which race. However, when you are racing it’s hard to pay attention to multiple people going different paces.  I hit mile 2 around 6:07 and just focused on the finish.

The third mile was rough, and I just wanted the race to be over.  I didn’t regret running, but I was riding the pain train home.  During the third mile, a woman passed me and tried to motivate me to hang with her.  As much as I wanted to keep up, it wasn’t in the cards, and she took over fourth place.

The last half mile was spent trying to get home.  When I crossed the third mile in 6:09, I knew there was no way it would be an accurate course.  I finished up with 3.25 miles in 19:50 and overall pace of 6:05.  That would equate out to an 18:45 5k which is about what I’ve been running.  A little bit slower on an easier course, but I felt more fatigued.clean air 5k

Thoughts:

I can’t say I’m happy about the time, course or how the events that morning played out but some days are like that.  I’m proud I still competed, and I had an enjoyable time with friends.  Plus it’s nice not to race in pouring rain.

Noelle and I post race

Questions for you:

What was the last morning things didn’t go as planned?

Have you ever raced a long course?

Training: Solid Workouts and Long 5ks

My training last week started off well and ended on a somewhat bittersweet note.  I started the week riding my high from the Phillies 5k, then as the week progressed, DOMS, lack of sleep and current events caught up with me.

Where to start?

Monday: 70 minutes easy
Tuesday: 65 minutes easy
Wednesday: Workout
Thursday: 70 minutes easy
Friday: 60 minutes easy
Saturday: 6X400s (7 miles total)
Sunday: Clean Air 5k (19:50)
Total: 61 miles

Easy runs were just that, easy.  Due to forecasted thunderstorms, I thought I would have to resort to running on the treadmill for a few days. I was lucky that I started running enough that I missed them.

Wednesday Workout:
1×15 minutes (6:31 pace)
1 mile (6:07)
2X8 minutes (6:30 pace)

As I mentioned on Instagram, this was definitely the best workout I’ve had in a very long time. I felt like I was on top of the world.

Saturday:
6X400 (1:35 average)

The goal of Saturday was to get some faster repeats.  Just to get some rust off.  I was tired, but they went according to plan.

Sunday:
Clean Air 5k (3.25 miles 19:50…average pace 6:05)

I was originally supposed to run a different race up North, but life came up, and I didn’t have enough time to get to the race.  There wasn’t a point to speed up there and so the morning of, I found something local.  I was disappointed, to say the least, but I made the best of the situation and found a local 5k that I was able to run.

However, the mess of the morning spilled into the race.  The race itself was an out and back on the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia (where I actually set my PR last year), but the course was long.  Not only that, but they had 10k walkers start 15 minutes before 5k runners.  It meant for about a mile, I was weaving around walkers.  It wasn’t optimal, I didn’t feel great, and it was a mess of a morning.  Some races aren’t glamorous, and you just feel like garbage…that was the story there, but I’ll have a full recap later.

Running Posts of the week:
How to Transition to Minimalist Running Shoes
March Training
Phillies 5k (18:32)

Questions for you:
Have you ever DNSed?
I think whenever I sign up online before a race, something happens.
What was your best workout last week?