Shamrock Half Marathon (1:29.52)

Shamrock Half Marathon (1:29.52)

This was my 8th year running Shamrock. Many long term readers know but I grew up in the greater VA Beach area. 1:29.52 is neither my fastest nor my slowest Shamrock. It’s on the slower side, but that’s okay.

Last year I had an incredible experience that would be hard to beat and ran a 1:23. This year the goal was just to finish healthy. My training over the winter was nothing to write home about, and I’ve come to terms that this Spring might be a rebuilding season for me (something I personally seem to need after every marathon?).

Anyway, I arrived at the start around 6 am. The weather was ideal. It was low 40s, some wind but not much. Most importantly, it wasn’t raining. Two years ago,it poured rain and was low 30s.

Before the race, I met up with my good friend Jen. We haven’t seen each other since we both lived in NYS. We’ve both since moved, but it was nice to catch up. She ultimately ran a 1:18 and placed 3rd.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

After that, I tooled around and got to the start about 5 minutes early. I talked with rabbit teammate, Nick, and by the time I knew it, we were off.

Since the half and full start together now, it was crowded. Right off the bat, I felt decent. Plus unlike the day prior, I remembered to start my watch. I plugged along and cruised the first mile in 6:44. I felt good and realized a sub 90 minute half was doable if I continued to feel okay through the race — a great goal to make a mile 1.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

At mile 2, I saw my dad’s friend and waved. I started getting into a rhythm.  The next three miles were relatively boring. I logged 6:44, 6:44, 6:40 (mile 4 on the gradual uphill was my fastest), 6:44. At mile 5, I was feeling good. I thought wow, this is much faster than I anticipated (I didn’t have a goal prerace, but didn’t anticipate being that fast either).

Then we entered Fort Story, and it all changed. Fort Story is a lonely part of the race. Unless you have a military ID, spectators can’t get on the base. It’s right along the water so extremely windy. In fact, one year there was a layer of sand across the entire course.

Miles 7-9 broke me both mentally and physically. I didn’t feel good, and I was running alone. There was some wind but nothing terrible. It wasn’t that I didn’t feel good because I had raced the day before, I just mentally felt disconnected and my legs felt stale. I told myself, make it to mile 10, and you’ll be heading directly home. I ran a 6:55, 6:59, 6:50, and kept it barely under 7 minutes.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

I knew the 90-minute pace group was probably catching me soon.  Around mile 10, a man started talking to me about “my form”.  I wasn’t feeling the greatest and not in the mood to chat. We kept plugging along.

Mile 11 went down with nothing major. I ran a 6:55 and we had some wind at our backs. At mile 12, the 90-minute/3 hour marathon pace group engulfed me. I thought, wow I really did slow down. I also felt my shoe beginning to come untied, and it just felt like the wheels had come off.

The group engulfed and went around me and it stung. I hit mile 12 just over 1:22 and I knew I was still at 1:30 pace. Now I was just much closer than the start of the race. It made me feel a little better the group was ahead of their goal pace.

The last mile goes to directly into the wind. When you’re close to a time goal, running into the wind the last mile is the last thing you want to do.  You can see the tent and King Neptune and it just never feels like it’s getting closer.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

Then at mile 13, I saw it click 1:29:10.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

I tried to sprint as hard as I could to the finish. I didn’t have much gas left but it was enough to get right under 1:30.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

Thoughts:

I’m pleased with the race but know I have a long way to go fitness wise. In all, another good Shamrock. It’s one of my favorite races of the year and I always enjoy seeing local friends as well as others that come from far.

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach me running

Yuengling Shamrock Half Marathon Virginia Beach

Chilling on the beach with Nick

Questions for you:

Have you run a race for several years in a row?

What is your favorite race? 

 

Shamrock Half Marathon (1:23.21)

Shamrock Half Marathon (1:23.21)

Shamrock half marathon is one of my favorite races.  I’ve run the race for the last 7 years and always enjoy myself in some sort of fashion.  Some years have been PRs, some have been proud to cross the finish line,  but every race has had enjoyable components.  I think J&A does an excellent job for runners of all speeds, paces, ages, and goals which is hard for any race director.  Not only that, but they are good people.  If you are looking for an 8k, 13.1, or 26.2 that if flat, fast, and fun, Shamrock is a great choice.  The weather has been good the last 5 out of 7 years I have run, which is high for a Spring Coastal race(and no they aren’t paying me to say that…sorry if you got the short end of weather in 2016/2017).

Anyway-

I had no goals for Shamrock.  I had run the Adrenaline 5k the day before.  Not only that but I was just tired.  Like I mentioned in my 5k recap, sometimes I underestimate life, and I thought I would actually get a good taper last week, but that didn’t happen.

After running the Adrenaline Run 5k in 18:29 on Saturday I drove back home to Shamrock.  I was lucky I remembered everything (which is atypical).

The drive was uneventful, I got to my parents, relaxed, and slept moderately well that night. Dad and I rolled up to Shamrock around 6:15.  This was the first year both the half and full went together, and the half start was pushed back to 7:30 (while the full was pushed forward).  Personally, I liked it because I got to see a lot more friends that way.

The weather looked ideal, and I was happy to enjoy the course because it wasn’t torrential rain this year. The weather was ideal for Shamrock and ideal running weather in general.

After taking too long, I pinned my bib and headed to the start.  I was able to see a lot of friends like my good friend Kris and Mollie.

shamrock half marathon va beach me running

After driving and feeling not the great the day before, I knew making a time goal was silly.  The primary plan was to have fun and run a strong race. Before the race, I walked around but didn’t jog or warm up.

Even though several thousand people are running, it’s always easy to use the bathroom, find your way to start, and not feel like a sardine. The gun went off, and so did we.  With the new addition of marathoners and halves starting together, it more packed and a much faster start.

I ran the first mile in 6:26 and was quite surprised.  I didn’t feel like I was about to randomly PR but I didn’t feel bad.  After the first mile, I began daydreaming about running my fastest Shamrock yet.  Then I told myself to wake the F up because I had run a race the day before.

The next couple of miles went by with no significant excitement.  I chatted with a few friends and saw one of my dad’s good work friends.  I hit the 5k in about 20 minutes, and we began the gradual climb over the next two miles.  As we started climbing, I began to feel even better.  I felt like my legs were opening up.  Despite the small and gradual climb, I hit the next couple of miles in 6:26.

Thank you, Ann, for the photo 

shamrock half marathon va beach me running

As we entered Fort Story, I saw myself getting in in the no man’s danger zone.  There was no one around, and Fort Story can often bring the most wind of any part of the race.  Last year there was sand blown across the course.

Luckily some men caught up with me, so I had a pack to run with.  They towed me along, and we began to slowly pick up the pace.  All of a sudden I found myself running 6:22s.  My body just felt good.

Around mile 9, I caught up with Katie who was leading the marathon for women.  She probably thought I was the most awkward, but I told her it was a dream to be running alongside her.  She looked as if she was just gliding along.

I hit mile 9 around 57 minutes, and I was ecstatic.  In every half, hitting mile 9 gives me a confidence boost.  Knowing I “only” have 4 miles to go seems manageable, and I then divide it into 2×2 miles.  Knowing I ‘only” have four miles to go, and feeling good feels even better.  I focused on making it to mile 11.

shamrock half marathon va beach me running

We began the long trek back to the finish.  I had entered another no man’s land of running alone, and for the most part, I just focused on the people about a minute ahead.  I passed a couple of people, but for the most part, I ran alone.

I hit mile 10 around 1:03.30 and told myself…I could run under 1:24 if you worked.

From there I just focused on the end.  I contemplated dropping my hat and gloves but decided to just keep them. I ran mile 10 in 6:11 and then entered my mindset of the “second 2 miles”.  Mile 11 for a half is always challenging.  You almost taste the finish line but then quickly realize mile 12 is still there.

Like usual, mile 11 was lonely, and I stared at my watch a few too many times.  There was nothing of note, and I caught a few people. Finally, I hit mile 12 in 1:16.30 and just told myself just go.  I told myself 7 more minutes.  I remembered in 2016 when I was passed by nearly 7 women (yes, 7) in the final mile.  This race was different, and I was finishing much stronger and over 3 minutes faster.

Finally, I hit the boardwalk and couple see King Neptune about half a mile away.  I stared longingly at him and powered to the finish. Along the boardwalk many people screamed “you’re almost there” and I bit my tongue multiple times. I never want to hear “almost there,” until my foot is one step from hitting the finish line.

I crossed the finish line in 1:23.21 and as 12th female overall.  I was shocked as it’s my fastest shamrock by over 90 seconds and was the least tapered I’ve been.  It was definitely one of the better weather days we’ve had (we had good weather the first 4 years I ran).

shamrock half marathon va beach me running

This race also gave me a lot of confidence.  I have been second guessing myself and wondering if Phoenix was a fluke PR and if I would be able to reach that again on a harder course.

I raced Shamrock 80 seconds slower, the day after I raced a 5k.  I tapered for Phoenix and did not for Shamrock, and I feel good about it.  To be honest, I feel better and more proud of my performances over the weekend and at Shamrock than I do about Phoenix.

Questions for you:

What race have you done the most?  What is your favorite race?

What race are you most proud of?

Shamrock Half Marathon (1:26.49)

Shamrock Half Marathon (1:26.49)

Last year, at Shamrock Half Marathon I ran a 1:26.50.  This year, my chip time was a 1:26.49.  While not a course PR, I did beat last years time.  Despite the race conditions being very similar (I.E. awful), for me, the races themselves were drastically different.  My last mile last year was probably 7:30+ and this year my last mile was a 6:11.

So let’s start from the beginning.  Shamrock was never a goal race for me.  It’s a race I like to do and I was hoping to run better than last year.

How did I quantify running better? By not only having a faster race but also not drastically blowing up like last year.

So technically, even though I’m much faster than 1:26 fitness, I did achieve my goals. But to be honest, I’m effing tired of running in terrible conditions.  Over the past year, I haven’t many longer races that are in decent conditions.  Most races have been in either pouring rain, sleet, snow, high humidity or windy. The only good weathered race that comes to mind is the Runners World Half, but I ran a 5k the day before.

Enough complaining! Last Friday, I prepared for the worst weather and brought my thick mittens, waterproof Gortex jacket, and appropriate attire.  By now, I know I need to be overdressed in cold, pouring rain or I’ll be miserable.

My coach James Mckirdy, Heather, Dad and I got to the race around 6 am, and we were lucky enough to stay with a personal friend right near the start.  I warmed up with Mollie and Heather.  I rarely do half marathon warmups, but while warming up, I didn’t feel terrible or even that cold.  It was pouring rain, but I wasn’t “as” miserable as last year.

We got to the race start at 7 am, and we were quickly off.  The first two miles were into a headwind.  With the headwind, I began settling into a negative mindset.  I hit the first mile in 6:59.  I was devastated.  Another race I had tapered for only to be foiled by rain.  I tried to clear my mind but just progressed on.

In hindsight, it’s easier to look back and see…yes it was windy.  Yes, the weather was awful.  In the moment, when you look down and quickly see you aren’t hitting your goal, it stinks.  I ran the second mile in 6:58.  It was mindless, and I was just staying with a pack of people.

shamrock half marathon me running 2017

So happy

As we rounded mile 3, I felt a wind break.  While it was still raining, it wasn’t as windy.  I ran a 6:54. Around mile 3, I wasn’t sure I would break 1:30 but I hoped I would be able to pick it up.  It’s a long gradual uphill from about miles 3-5.

During the fourth mile, one of the UGH moments of running happened.  My shoe came untied.  I was running in a new pair of Saucony flats, and while I did double knot them, they came untied.  Was it a combination of pouring rain and the material the shoe laces are made out of?  Probably because it happened 3 times and it stunk.  Looking closely at the shoe laces, the plastic coating seems to be the cause.

I stopped to tie my shoe and progressed on.  I didn’t catch the people I was with until around mile 5-6.  With the stop I ran the 4th mile in 6:49 but I was motivated because I knew I stopped for at least 15 seconds.  The race clock doesn’t stop when you tie your shoe, so neither does my garmin. shamrock half marathon me running 2017

I ran the next two miles by myself.  I was alone and lost in my own thoughts.  The race conditions were awful, but I was slowly changing my mindset. I ran the next two miles in 6:30 and 6:36.

As we entered Fort Story, I thought about last year.  Last year, the wind from Fort Story broke me.  I went from running around 6:30 miles to running 7+ and crawling to the finish line.  I was determined not to let that happen.  The wind was blowing more through Fort Story this year, and it had blown sand across a section of course.  We ran through 2 inches of sand!

This year, I felt good during the middle miles, and I credit most of that to overdressing.  My other shoe lace came untied, and I briefly stopped to tie it.  I ran a 6:37 mile.  As I began thinking about the finish, I knew my body felt able and willing to run faster than a 1:30 than I had previously anticipated during the first few miles.shamrock half marathon me running 2017

I crossed mile 9 in 6:24 and mile 10 in 6:25.  I began catching a few people, and one male was running with me.  I saw Chris who ended up finishing a few feet in front of me and 7th lady overall.  The man told me to “go with her”…

The last three miles were a blur.  I just found myself counting down the miles.  2 miles to go and then 1 and then the final mile.  I saw James and Heather with about .5 to go and shouted: “I’m not dying”.  I guess that is always a good thing for an athlete to say. I also saw my friend Sika, who had raced the One City Marathon the weekend before.

As we approached the boardwalk, I saw the finish line, and I knew it would be close to my previous time.  Until that moment, I hadn’t even dreamed it was a possibility to actually run faster than 2016.

For no reason, I mentally separate a 1:26.XX half in a different category as a 1:27+-half.  I wanted to break 1:27 and sprinted to the finish. shamrock half marathon me running 2017

I crossed in 1:26.50…the same time as last year.  With chip timing, my official time was 1:26.49.

shamrock half marathon me running 2017

My husband didn’t run but still came out to support us!

Thoughts:

To be honest, I’m tired of racing in bad conditions.  While I’m proud of myself for handling the race well this year, I am also tired of not racing in good (not even ideal but good) conditions.  I feel as though I’ve been in PRing shape for the last 6 months but the weather has had other plans.  I’m hoping the April Fools Half Marathon will have better weather.

Questions for you:
What is the worst race conditions you’ve run in?
Which race have you done the most times?

 

RnR VA Beach (1:29.46)

I’ve run Rock N Roll VA Beach twice before (2013 and 2015 ).  Despite being injured for most of the summer, I had high hopes I would be able to run in 2016 too.

Even if it meant forgoing my pride and running faster than a PR, I set earlier in the year. 

Even if it meant my only goal was “to finish.” 

As luck would have it, I hadn’t had any pain in my foot for several weeks.  I decided to use RnR to test my fitness and foot at the half marathon distance.  I was confident with my training that my foot would be fine, but I had no idea what kind of time I would run. That being said, if it hurt anyway, I would have stopped too.

So with that, I toed the line on Sunday.  My PR allowed me to have an F bib, and I was F5.  Never in my wildest dreams would I think I would end up as fifth female, and my only goal was to finish.  Since I grew up in VA Beach and half of my friends still live there, I felt like the race was a reunion.  I saw a lot of my close friends including well-known blogger Kris L (who ended up as second overall).  As I told my dad, I never seemed to stop talking during the race.  I high-fived little kids; I shouted to my friends spectating and talked to fellow racers.

The hurricane and high winds caused the race to have a few modifications such as fewer course structures like the mile markers, as well as the start and finish line overhead.  They could have blown out to sea…but at least the race was on.  The mile on the sand the day before was cancelled due to the hurricane and travel advisory.

I reminded myself everyone was dealing with the weather.  Luck hasn’t been on my side for racing weather this year, so I’ve let that one go…It wasn’t as windy as the April Fools half and it wasn’t as rainy as the Shamrock or Broad Street so I called it a “good” weather day.

 Roll Virginia Beach results

Before the race. We ended up all making the top 5

The race went off, and I decided to run on my own.  I didn’t want to feel pressured by a pace group.  (There was both a 1:25 and 1:32).  My legs were stiff, but I felt pretty good. My friend, Greg, ran close by and said he was going to try and run below 1:30.  As much as I wanted to stay with him, I wasn’t sure if that was in my realm of possibilities.  We chatted for about two miles.  We ran each at 6:42 and 6:48.

I had mixed feelings during the first mile.  I’ve run three 5ks now, all around the 6:30 pace.  12 seconds per mile slower but four times the distance didn’t seem like my brightest idea…but I was running on how I felt for the day.

During the third mile, I began to realize this was much longer than the few 5ks I recently ran.  As we ran through the third mile, the 5kers turned off.  I hit the 5k in 21:27.

The next few miles went without much notice.  There was the wind but it wasn’t unmanageable.  I found myself running in a pack of men.  At the time I had no idea what place I was in and honestly I didn’t care.

I was constantly reevaluating my foot.  Nothing hurt and that was all right by me.  Somewhere between mile 3-4, I waved to someone and bumped my watch into split mode.  I had no idea how to fix it, so I ran the rest of the race relatively blind to pace and time.  I could do simple math based on timing to figure out approximately where I was at.  My mile markers beeped at the .3.

 Roll Virginia Beach results

Around mile 5, I started running with a guy named Brett who is training for his second marathon.  We chatted for several miles, and they went by quickly.  I also noticed two females about a quarter of a mile in front.  I wanted to catch them but didn’t know how my endurance would hold up in the final miles…would it be another repeat of bombing Shamrock?  That race is a memory I never want to remember.

We hit the halfway point in 44:46.  At that point, my lofty goal was to break 1:30.  I did know since the winds were coming from the north, it would be a strong headwind for the final two miles.  I opted not to think very far ahead.

During mile 7, I faded.  I found myself disconnected from the race and in the negative zone.  Looking at my Garmin now; I ran about a 7 min mile.

As I saw I was reeling the two women in, I began to feel rejuvenated.  I reminded the race was already halfway over, and I could do it.  We went on the base, and the course went in a giant U.  I could see the racers out ahead, and I could see the top women several minutes ahead.

I caught both women and as I left the base mentally preparing for the final four miles.  I hit mile ten around 1:08:30 and thought, “I could still be on track to break 1:30.”

There is a mini out and back on the course, and we saw racers running between 2-3 hour marathons.  They were cheering, and it was motivating for us.  I tried to cheer for everyone I knew too.

A man came up behind me and said, he had wanted to catch my green CEPs for a while…I didn’t know what to say so I said, “they were like little beacons”.  He ran by me, and I was the one chasing him for the remainder of the race.

Mile 11 always seems to be the hardest mile for me in a half.  At mile 11, the race is almost over but then again, not really.  We went over a small bridge, and it got to be windy. I put on my sunglasses to keep sand out of my eyes (and to hide the pain).  The lack of speed work, training and endurance began catching me.  My foot, however, felt fine.

 Roll Virginia Beach results

We came down the bridge, clicked through mile 12 and by the time I knew it we were running the final mile on the boardwalk.  The final mile was extremely windy and lonesome.  Sand was whipping around.  I had been unsure whether I wanted to wear my sunglasses but they proved to be helpful to keep sand out of my eyes.

 Roll Virginia Beach results

I was running the straight away by myself with spectators around.  Honestly, I was jealous.  I wanted to stand around in a hoodie and with coffee too.  Since it was too windy for the typical finishers line, you didn’t know when the finish was coming.  You felt like it would never come.  The only thing that signalled the race was over was a timing mat.  When I finally saw the outline of a finishers mat, I decided to hammer out what I believe was the last quarter of a mile.

 Roll Virginia Beach results

I saw the clock ticking into the 1:29s and I had no idea if I would be under 1:30. I don’t know why I was so concerned, but I gave it everything I had and crossed in 1:29.46.  I finished triumphal.  I was fifth female overall.

Roll Virginia Beach results

After crossing I felt extremely happy.  I finished the race injury free, and exeeded any time goals I had for myself. I’m not in the fitness I was earlier in the year but I know with both time and effort, I’ll get back there eventually.  I’m proud that I ran a smart race and able to run consistently as well.

 Roll Virginia Beach results

It was great to see so many friends as well as family on course.

Questions for you:

Have you ever run a Rock n’ Race?  

Have you ever had a race cancelled? 

Shamrock Half Marathon (1:26.50)

What to say about this race? 

The time 1:26.50 is respectable, and I gave it my all that day.  Was it a PR or a time I’m happy with? No.

I knew it was supposed to pour rain at Shamrock, but it didn’t hit me until it actually began pouring rain at the start.  Prior to the race, I checked the weather most days and it indicated it was supposed to rain and be cold.  It was never a secret the weather was going to be awful but I chose to ignore it and pretend it wasn’t real life.

The day before the race the weather was fine. 

The drive to start was windy but fine. 

The walk to the start was windy but fine.

At the start, it began to downpour and made it as miserable as possible. I questioned why I was even there.  To set the stage, it was also 40 degrees and windy.  The wind made the “feel” temperature around 30 degrees.

The half marathon started at 7 am and it was still dark.  As we counted down the start, I stared at my watch and decided not to use it.  I made a quick decision to race on feel and be blind to pace and time.  I knew this wasn’t going to be a fast race, and it was better for me not to worry about it.  My watch has died during several races including my first full marathon, so running blindly doesn’t bother me.

There were three clocks on the course at miles 1, 5 and 10.  Except for that, I had no idea of time.

The first mile was rough.  I questioned my racing flat because I could not get enough traction on the ground.  To be honest, I contemplated dropping out of the race because I wasn’t getting enough traction. I think if I had a do-over, I would have worn a trainer with more grip.  I was sliding around, and I thought I was going to fall and take other racers out too.

We hit the first mile in 6:10 which was shocking.  I started way too fast for the conditions. It didn’t feel that fast either. #sillyLOLZ

The next two miles I ran with a pack.  I felt decent, but the rain began taking a mental and physical toll on my body.

Before I knew it, we were at mile 4, and the pack dropped me.  I was running alone, which is where I stayed for a long time.  I knew I shouldn’t try to maintain the pace because I want to chase a PR on a better day.

Around mile 6, my friends Howie and Mike caught up with me. They passed me, and I found myself at the hardest stretch of the race.

I ran mile 6, 7 and 8 and nine by myself.  There was no one within 30 seconds in front or behind me.  This also happened to be the windiest stretch of the race.  Every year, the wind in Fort Story is bad.  2016 was one of the windiest years.

The wind blew my hat off around mile 8. I ran over and collected it, only to realize, I had no idea what was going on with my hair.  It had ripped my scrunchie and ear warmer off too.  I never stopped running during the fiasco; I just slapped my hat over everything prayed for the best.  I didn’t know if my hair was up or down…just that it was a complicated mess.

As we left Fort story around mile 9, several people caught me.  It was like a relay of people catching and whizzing by.  Most people said “nice work”.  I tried to mutter “you too” but honestly, my mouth was frozen.  I’m sure I appeared to be a negative nancy when all I could muster was a grunt.

At mile 10, the clock read something like 1:06.  I knew it was slower than normal but at that point, I was so delirious it didn’t matter.  It honestly felt similar to the last 10k of both marathons I’ve run.  I was cold, miserable and in a dark spot.

shamrock marathon 1

When I entered the boardwalk at mile 12, I didn’t feel a final push like I normally do.  In fact, I felt the opposite.  The last .2 didn’t feel like it was coming any closer and several people flew by me.  My legs were heavy and locked up from the cold. My mind was in the twilight zone, and I didn’t notice much. Five women passed me in the final stretch but honestly I didn’t care I just wanted to stop running.

When I finally saw the clock, I was surprised. It felt as if I was inching along slower than a slogging recovery run. I crossed in 1:26.50 and my body immediately locked up.  My legs felt stiff; my calves tired, and I was cold.  I went through the shoot, tried to smile at friends and booked it straight to get warm clothing.  (By booked, I mean hobbled slower than a senior citizen).

Normally I cool down after any race, but I didn’t have the energy.  I didn’t have the energy to stay at the post race party and hang out like I wanted.  I drank some of the Murphys Irish Stew and Gatorade, picked up dad and Heather, and we went home.  Shamrock zapped most of my energy and I looking back I realized the rain had made me hypothermic as well.  I finished the race feeling like I had just run a full marathon.

Thoughts:

I don’t know what to think.  It always feels crummy to have a negative race.  I have been on a steady half marathon progression since last August.

Without the hard races, we cannot have the races that feel effortless.

Final stats: 

shamrock stats

As you can see, I significantly slowed down in the second half.  My average for the second half was probably above 6:50 with 7:00-minute miles too.  

In the end, I know I’m in better shape than 1:26.50.  It doesn’t define me, my running or racing.  It’s just a single race.  Hopefully, I’ll have another half marathon that builds back my confidence before the summer.  Looking back, however, I don’t think the weather was the only thing that affected me that day.  It was the primary factor, but I also believe my legs were tired and not as rested as I thought.  Would I do Shamrock again?  Of course, you can’t control the weather.  I raced to the best of my abilities for the day, and I’m glad I still showed up.

The local news wrote an article making runners feel more badass than normal.

Questions for you:
Have you ever raced in the pouring rain?
Did you celebrate St. Patrick’s Day?

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