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New Balance 1080 v10 Shoe Review

New Balance 1080 v10 Shoe Review

New Balance 1080 v10 Shoe Review

New Balance has done a lot of great things with their shoes in 2019. From the New Balance Fuelcell Rebel to the New Balance 880, I’ve been a fan of pretty much everything they’re put out. I’ve run off and on in the New Balance 1080 for a few years. TheNew Balance 1080 v10 is very different than previous versions but in a good way. When someone asks: did my shoe change much, the answer is usually no. When someone asks did the New Balance 1080 change much, the answer is yes, it did by a lot.

Every aspect of the newest 1080 had to be better than it was before.

New Balance 1080 v10 Shoe Review

New Balance 1080 v10 Quick Facts:

Weight: 8.9

Heel to Toe Drop: 8 mm

New Balance 1080 v10 Fit:

The upper of the New Balance 1080 v10 is entirely different from previous versions. It’s still an engineered knit upper, but now with it’s been designed with a custom computer modeling technique called “reaction-diffusion.”  What does that mean? The upper creates different stretches within the same fabric.

New Balance calls this new fabric, “Hypoknit.” The Hypoknit is designed to support all the way around the shoe as well as be flexible for a more customizable fit.  Before Hypoknit, if you wanted a stretchy material as well as breathable, you would have to use completely different fabrics. Now it can all be done together on one machine.

New Balance 1080 v10 Shoe Review

All of this to say, the upper is now one material.  

One issue with the New Balance 1080 was the heel counter. Some felt as though the heel counter was too thin and sharp. The 3d heel counter of the New Balance 1080 v10 has been redesigned and is slimmer and less rigid. It also flairs up, so it doesn’t bother the Achilles.

New Balance 1080 v10 Shoe Review

I’ve worn anywhere between a 10-11 wide in the New Balance 1080 and I found the 10.5 to fit well.  I appreciate the wide toe box, New Balance is well known for.

New Balance 1080 v10 Ride:

Like the previous version of the New Balance 1080, the New Balance 1080 v10 uses a full-length fresh foam. New Balance Fresh Foam is known for its softness like a sponge. For the 10th version, New Balance has created “Fresh Foam X.” Fresh Foam X is a new cushion that has more cushioning and energy return.  Compared to previous versions of New Balance 1080, the Balance 1080 v10 is much softer mile after mile.

If you flip over the New Balance 1080 v10, you’ll also notice the change to the bottom of the shoe. Now, it features blown rubber outsole lug segments.  These blown outsole lug segments help provide the New Balance 1080 v10, traction as well as easier flex.

New Balance 1080 v10 Shoe Review

New Balance 1080 v10 Conclusion:

I think the New Balance 1080 v10 is one of the best-updated shoes of 2019. It’s lighter, more cushioned, and more responsive. It will remain a daily trainer for me and I’m fairly certain this will be a shoe I go through more than one of the New Balance 1080 v10.

New Balance 1080 v10 Shoe Review

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: New Balance 1080 v10, Diadora Mythos Elite TRX, Hoka Bondi 6Saucony Triumph 17 Shoe Review

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

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Newton Gravity 8 Shoe Review

Newton Gravity 8 Shoe Review

Newton Gravity 8 Shoe Review

It has been a minute since I ran in Newton. For those who don’t know, the Newton Gravity was one of my first running shoe ever. In fact, I almost run exclusively in Newtons until working at the running store 6 years ago. I ran the in Newton Gravity 1 and Newton Gravity 2. I believe I ran in a pair of the Newton Gravity 3, but that was the extent of it. In total, I ran in 17 pairs of Newton Gravity (I distinctly remember counting one day).

I found this gem from the early days of blogging: I learned: a: I ran in a lot of Newtons. b: my photography has gotten better. (or maybe c. phone camera quality is better)

Back in their heyday…

Anyway, when I started working at the running store in 2014, I began running in different brands. I haven’t come back to Newton until this year. For those who don’t know, Newtons have a unique sole with “lugs.” They take some time to work into and you will have issues if you start running all of your mileage in them immediately.

Newton Gravity 8 Shoe Review

Newton Gravity 8 Quick Facts:

Heel to Toe Drop: 3 mm

Weight: 9.1 ounces

What are the Newton Gravity Lugs?

All models of Newtons hae lugs in the forefoot.  The lugs allow your body to be at a more flat heel to toe differential. If you are looking for a lower heel to toe drop, the Newton Gravity 8 has a 3 mm with the lugs.

Newton Gravity 8 Shoe Review

Newton Gravity 8 Fit:

First, it would be unfair to compare the Newton Gravity 8 to the original Newton Gravity. Like most brands, the upper is much more breathable and engineered mesh uses no seam on the foot to fit your foot better. For the Newton Gravity 8, Newton introduces Adaptive Fit, engineered mesh.

The seamless upper molds to your foot for a secure ride. Newton wants the Gravity to feel “amazingly” soft, breathable and snug experience. I do appreciate the Newton Gravity 8 is wider than previous models and molds to the contours of my foot well. I typically wear between a women’s size 10-11 wide and the 10.5 fits well.

Newton Gravity 8 Shoe Review

Newton Gravity 8 Ride:

Like any Newton Running Shoe, the Newton Gravities take time to get work into. Since the Newton Gravity has a 3 mm heel to toe drop, which puts more stress on your calves. If you have already been running in lowering heel to toe drops and minimal shoes, it should take less time to get used too. What is different when the Newton Gravity, is even though it has a minimal heel to toe drop, it has full foot cushioning. The trampoline-like cushioning system causes the foot to bounce back and lose less energy.

Most people’s first impression is they feel “weird” or “different.” It’s different than the traditional foam-core running shoe. You feel the lugs under your feet and you feel them walking around. Even though I’ve run in Newton Gravities, it still felt weird to come back to them 5 years later. Weird in a good way.  Take your time getting used to them. I started running 1 mile in them (then switching into another shoe) for the rest of my run to make sure my body felt good.

When you first start running in the Newton Gravity 8, you’ll notice the lugs.

Newton Gravity 8 Shoe Review

What do the lugs do?

The lugs help promote a midfoot strike and propel you forward. All Newton Running shoes use proprietary “Action/Reaction Technology.”  The movement of the lugs generates the Action/Reaction Technology. It creates a responsive ride that provides less energy loss than most traditional running shoes.  Similar to an adidas running shoe but that quality and durability is much higher in Newton.

Now that I’m used to them, I’e run anywhere between 1-10 miles in the Newton Gravity 8. I like how cushioned they are while still being responsive.

One issue that has always been a problem is Newtons can collect debris.  I’ve gotten many rocks stuck between the lugs. I recommend sticking to the roads where the technology of the lugs can be used and less debris gets stuck between the lugs.

Newton Gravity 8 Shoe Review

Newton Gravity 8 Conclusion:

I like the Newton Gravity 8 and it’s fun to run in a shoe that was so familiar to me for so many years. I will continue to run in them and use them more for daily runs. I think they fit best there. Finally, it’s essential to mention the Newton Gravity 8 is $175. Newton has claimed you can get more mileage out of the shoes.

When I ran consistently in the Newton Gravity, I found I could get between 500-600 miles; when many shoes, I could only get 300-400. Every foot is different and when your body doesn’t feel good, it might be the shoes. Do I think the price of the Newton Gravity 8 is worth it? I do think if you get the full amount of mileage in them, you aren’t paying much more.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Diadora Mythos Elite TRXHoka Bondi 6, Newton Gravity 8

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

Have you tried Newtons before? Have you tried the Newton Gravity 8?

What was the first shoe you ran in? 

The Anatomy of a Running Shoe

The Anatomy of a Running Shoe

The Anatomy of a Running Shoe:

The anatomy of a running shoe is a post I’ve wanted to write for a while.

The anatomy of a running shoe

Since I write a shoe review most weeks, it occurred to me that many people didn’t realize what the actual parts that made up a running shoe are. No shame in that; your only job is to make sure the shoe feels good when you wear it.  It is easier to describe what you like or don’t like in a shoe if you know a few basic terms.

Pictured is the New Balance 1500 (a racing flat ideal for 5ks to marathons)

Anatomy of a running shoe

The “Upper”: 

The upper part of a shoe is exactly what it sounds like: the top of the shoe.  These days, most brands use an upper made of lightweight, breathable, engineered mesh. Although some uppers are made from leather or suede too. Some shoes are even waterproof and the upper can keep water out while still keeping it breathable.

Now, most uppers are seamless, so it doesn’t rub against a wider forefront or bunion. The upper and the shoelaces help secure the foot.  The upper protects your feet and is also what helps keep dirt, rocks or debris out of a shoe.

The anatomy of a running shoe

Toe Box:

The toe box of a running shoe is generally the widest part of the shoe and where your feet and toes are located. You always want movement in the toebox and don’t want your feet to feel squished.

You should be able to wiggle your toes before and after a run comfortably. There should also be about the width of your thumbs length from your longest toe (even if your longest toe is your second or third toe). Having the extra space helps reduce the loss of toenails and keeps your feet from going numb.

Also Included in the Upper Anatomy of a Running Shoe:

Shoe Laces: Shoelaces or Velcro are what hold the top of your foot securely into place. This portion of the shoe is one of the most important for fit in the anatomy of a running shoe.

Tongue: Many people don’t realize the tongue has a purpose! It protects the top of your foot from the pressure of shoelaces but also prevents debris from getting inside.

Heel counter: The heel counter is the firm cup in the back of your shoe to secure your heel. The heel counter makes sure your foot doesn’t slide around. It’s essential always to untie your shoes so you don’t damage the heel counter. Damaging it will bend the plastic and can cause Achilles tendon issues.

Midsole:

The midsole of a running shoe is located between the outsole and the upper. The upper is attached to the midsole of the shoe. Currently, the majority of midsoles are made of a foam called EVA (called ethyl vinyl acetate). Each brand uses different cushioning or EVA that they deem “the best.”

Outsole:

The outsole is a critical component of running shoes, especially when running in inclement weather. The outside is what provides traction on the roads. In trail shoes, the outsole is often thicker to offer more traction. Each brand has different traction in grooves to protect the feet.

Most road shoes are made from blown rubber, which is softer and more flexible. A trail shoe is usually more rigid and is often made of carbon rubber to keep it stiff.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Medial Post:

Not every shoe has a medial post or stability piece to it. Many do, but not all. Most running shoes fall into one of the following combinations: motion control, neutral shoes, or stability shoes. Motion control shoes are designed with the most support, where neutral have zero support. (They can have cushion, but keep in mind support does equal cushion).Stability helps keep a collapsed arch propped in or someone who pronates back into neutral.

The medial post is one of the most important components to determining if a shoe will work for you. If you need a lot of stability and the shoe is neutral, chances are it won’t work. Not everyone needs medial support and using a shoe that has support when you don’t need it can lead to other issues. Most stability components of a shoe are made out of a dual-density combination of TPU (thermoplastic urethane) and EVA.

Not all stability pieces are the same. Some shoes provide minor stability where some is much more corrective. Each brand and each shoe within a brand are different.

The Shank:

Many people don’t even realize a running shoe “shank” exists. The shank is what controls the flexion and torsion of a shoe. It helps the bend naturally and helps with a smooth transition from heel to toe.  The stiffer the shank, the less the shoe will flex.

Heel Drop:

One of the most common questions in the running world, is what a shoe heel to toe drop? I wrote a newsletter on it a few months ago. In short, the heel to toe drop is the height of the heel minus the height of the forefront (in millimeters). For example, a zero drop shoe (like the brand Altra) has the same height and cushion in the heel as the forefront. Most traditional shoes have between 10-12 mm.

Thicker heels will usually cause your heel to drop and hit the ground first, whereas a thinner heel will be easier to run more on your forefront. There is no right or wrong heel drop in the anatomy of a running shoe but it takes trial and error to figure out what works best for you.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Last:

When it comes to last, not every brand is the same. The last of the shoe is essentially the shape of the shoe. Most running shoe lasts curved, but shoe lasts can be curved, semi-curved, or straight. If you flip over and look at your Brooks shoe, you can see it curves in the front, pinches in the middle, and curves out in the back. Most traditional running shoes are semi-curved. Finding a last that matches the shape of your foot is just as important as finding a shoe that matches your needs structurally. In the anatomy of a running shoe, the last is what will help find the correct fit.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Why is the Anatomy of a Running Shoe Important for Runners?

Knowing the anatomy of a running shoe because you can find the shoe that works for you both structural and by shape. At the end of the day, you want to find the shoe you are most comfortable in.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport.

Questions for you:

What is your favorite shoe? Why? 

Were you familiar with the anatomy of a running shoe?

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

The New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review:

The New Balance 1400 is a consistent and established racing flat for many runners. There is enough cushion to race a marathon, but it’s also light enough to race a hard mile. In my quest to find a marathon racing shoe for the New York City Marathon, I tried the New Balance 1400v6. Ultimately, I think the New Balance Fuelcell Rebel will be my marathon choice, but I like the ride of the NB 1400 too.

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

New Balance 1400v6 Quick Facts:

Heel to Toe Drop: 10 mm

Weight: 7.2 oz

New Balance 1400v6 Fit:

For the most part, the updates of the New Balance 1400 updates are in the upper and the fit. Like many brands and shoes, the New Balance 1400v6 now has an engineered mesh upper with no seams. The breathable mesh package helps to fit more feet (especially if your forefront is wider), but also, the New Balance 1400v6 is about an ounce lighter and a more airy feel.

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

A brand new update to the upper of the New Balance 1400v6 is also the internal “FantomFit support cage.”  What is that? The FantomFit support cage is designed to hold the foot securely in place. I did run in the previous version of the New Balance 1400, and I find the NB 1400v6 to hug my feet more and slip less.

Lastly, New Balance did update the tongue of the NB 1400.  A common complaint to the New Balance 1400 series is the paper-thin tongue. Many people struggled with it causing irritation or cutting the top of the foot. It’s been updated to lay flat on the foot.

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

New Balance 1400v6 Ride:

The NB 1400v6 has minimal changes with the ride in the 6th version. The New Balance 1400v6 continues to the New Balance foam “revlite.” What is a Revlite midsole? The Revlite midsole is a durable, lightweight foam and smooth. Since New Balance is such a large company, they have many different foams, including “fresh foam,” “Revlite,” and “Fuelcell.” I appreciate how firm the New Balance 1400v6 is and that it responds well when racing hard.

Like the previous versions of the New Balance 1400, there is a plastic shank from the midfoot to the forefoot. The shank acts as a spring, which helps for a smooth transition from midfoot to the forefront.

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

One thing that is unique about the NB 1400 series is the stack height. The stack height of the New Balance 1400v6 is 25 mm in the heel and 15 mm in the forefront. The 10mm drop is almost unheard of in a racing flat. (Most racing lats are anywhere between 0-4 mm). It seems to work well, especially if you are using more traditional running shoes for the bulk of your training.

One thing I can appreciate with the New Balance 1400 v6, is the amount of blown rubber and traction in the NB 1400. It consistently performs well in the rain. If New York is rainy, the New Balance 1400 will most likely be my shoe of choice. There is plenty of traction and I won’t worry about sliding down the course on race day.

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

New Balance 1400v6 Conclusion:

The New Balance 1400 is a classic shoe and it’s an excellent option for 5ks to marathons. The NB 1400 is a staple racing flat that I believe will be around in the running industry for a long time. There aren’t many speed workouts this shoe can’t handle. For me, it’s the best choice in a rainy race or marathon.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Bondi 6,  Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport.

Questions for you:

Have you run in the New Balance 1400v6?

What is your go-to race day shoe? 

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

So far, New Balance has created a few shoes in their “Fuelcell line.” The New Balance Fuelcell Rebel (I most likely will run New York City Marathon in), the New Balance 5280 (the carbon plated 1m-5k shoe), The Balance Fuelcell Propel (which I have yet to try) and the New Balance Fuelcell Echo.

I initially thought the New Balance Fuelcell Echo would be my marathon shoe, but I think (for me), the New Balance Fuelcell Rebel will be a bit better.In general, the New Balance Fuelcell collection and technology is designed to be fast.

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Quick Facts:

Weight: 8.3 oz

Heel to Toe Drop: 6 mm

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Fit:

The New Balance Fuelcell Echo fits almost exactly like a sock. I haven’t had a shoe fit so well and be comfortable from putting it on in a while.

The New Balance Fuelcell Echo uses an engineered knit upper, which provides structure but breathes well. I’ve run a couple of times in hot and humid conditions and the New Balance Fuelcell Echo breathed throughout the run.

The heel of the New Balance Fuelcell Echo has a TPU heel counter, which makes or a secure fit. Many brands, including the Brooks Levitate 2, have tried (and failed) to use a higher heel counter. The New Balance Fuelcell Echo doesn’t irritate the heel of the shoe and fits well.

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

I typically wear between a women’s size 10-11 wide and the 10.5 fits well. 

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Ride:

All of the New Balance Fuelcell shoes are designed with speed and performance in mind. They are all designed to be faster shoes. Where does the New Balance Fuelcell Echo fit? The New Balance Fuelcell Echo is a good road and an everyday trainer. While you can race or run faster, it’s more designed for the bulk of your mileage.

New Balance’s vision with the New Balance Fuelcell Echo is the shoe you can run in as well as casually wear around. I tend to agree that it’s one of the few trainers I like for both running and casually living life.

Like the New Balance Fuelcell Rebel, the Fuelcell Echo has a full-length fuel cell midsole. That means it has a high energy return.

Finally, one thing I appreciate in the New Balance Fuelcell Echo is the traction and grip. The entire outside is crafted with “Ndurance,” which is a rubber that is both light but also durable. The New Balance Fuelcell Echo isn’t a shoe I would take on trails, but it is great for inclement weather.

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Shoe Review

New Balance Fuelcell Echo Conclusion:

The New Balance Fuelcell Echo surprised me. I appreciate the cushion of the Fuelcell Echo but also that it can be worn more as a lifestyle shoe.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Bondi 6,  Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

What is a shoe you wear casually? 

What is your favorite racing shoe? 

 

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