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Diadora Fly Shoe Review

Diadora Fly Shoe Review

Before a few months ago, when I thought of the brand Diadora, I thought of soccer shoes.  Even fashion shoes, but definitely not running.

Diadora is an Italian company that is slowly breaking into the running industry.  If you are local, they are creating their US headquarters in Camden, NJ.  Pretty cool since most running brands are based out of the West Coast or Boston area.

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Ride:

Diadora has designed the midsole with their “Blushield technology”.  What does this mean? The BlueShield technology is designed to provide dynamic stability.  So it’s stable when you need it and not when you don’t. This is especially good if one-foot pronates more than the other or your gait drastically changes at the finish of the run.

Diadora Fly Shoe Review

It’s very soft and cushioned.  I like how light and responsive it is. One thing I appreciated is right out of the box, the shoe felt great. I never felt as though I needed to “adjust to them” or “break them in”.  You shouldn’t feel like that anyway, but I felt good when I added these to my rotation.

There is plenty of cushioning in both the heel and forefront of the shoe to absorb the impact. Even with all of the cushioning, you still maintain a lot of contact with the ground, and they are responsive.

Fit:

As far as running shoes go, these are one of the widest brands out there.  They are cut on an overall more full and straight last.  Typically I wear a women size 10-11 wide, and the regular 10 felt bigger than any other 10 I’ve worn.  I stuck with the 10, and it’s a good fit for me.

The upper has no seems which is great for someone with bunions. It is lightweight and breathable.  I don’t have any complaints.

Diadora Fly Shoe Review

Conclusion:

I was pleasantly surprised and like the Diadora Fly.  You won’t find a lot of information online about them, because they are newer to the running scene.  In fact, local to me in New Jersey they are available to Philly Runner, Haddonfield RunningCo, Runners High, and Brooklyn Runner.  Diadora is a high-quality brand, and I’m enjoying them.  I hope they continue to stay in the industry.

If you like the Brooks Ghost, Brooks Launch, Saucony Ride, Saucony Kinvara, Mizuno or Wave Rider, New Balance 1400, or Nike Pegasus they might fit nicely into your rotation.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Mach, Saucony Ride ISO, Brooks Glycerin 15

Workouts: Nike Fly, Saucony Type A

Races: Nike Fly, Saucony Type A

Questions for you:

Have you ever worn a smaller brand?

What is your current favorite shoe?

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ON Cloudflow Shoe Review

ON Cloudflow Shoe Review

Recently, I decided to add another shoe into my rotation.  I haven’t run in ON for a couple of years, but I thought it would be fun to add.  The Cloudflow is a lightweight neutral shoe.  The Swiss company, ON, is known for their looks of a running shoe and they impress many.

ON Cloudflow Shoe Review

ON Cloudflow Upper Info

The brand, ON, is narrow with all of their shoes.  I would personally benefit from them making a wider last. However, the Cloudflow fits comfortably.  Typically I wear size 10-11 wide shoes, and a 10is fine.  Despite being more narrow, the Cloudflow does fit more true to size than many brands.

The upper itself is seamless and moves with your foot.  It accommodates wider widths as well as bunions well.  In all, it’s not a bad fit.

ON Cloudflow Shoe Review

ON Cloudflow Ride:

I like the brand, ON, because their technology in shoes is noticeable and apparent. The sole uses a “Cloud-Tec sole,” which uses 18 individual “clouds” to displace pressure.  Since the “clouds” are hallow, the shoe is very light.

A few things about the “Cloud-Tec” sole that makes me hesitant:

  • It collects rocks. If you run on gravel, dirt, or even road, you will probably collect a few at the bottom.
  • It doesn’t grip well to ice or in inclement conditions.

I’ve run a few workouts as well as 10 miles, and they’ve been fine in those situations.Personally, I do like the Cloudflow but prefer it for ideal conditions or the treadmill.  I find it best suited there.  For me, this is an excellent shoe for longer workouts or faster workouts.  I’ve used it for everything from a 6-mile tempo to a 10-mile easy run, and I think the best place in my rotation is tempo runs.  It feels more connected to the ground than many brands.

ON Cloudflow Conclusions

I like the ON Cloudflow, and I believe it has a place in my rotation.  I think it’s a good lightweight shoe.  It reminds me a lot of lighter adidas shoes.

Other shoes in my rotation:

Easy/Long Runs: Brooks Glycerin, Hoka Mach, Saucony Ride

Workouts: Nike Zoom Fly, ON Cloudflow

Races: Saucony Type A, Nike Zoom fly

Questions for you:

Have you tried ON Running shoes?

What is your current favorite shoe?

Saucony Triumph ISO 4 Shoe Review

Saucony Triumph ISO 4 Shoe Review

Recently, I integrated the Saucony Triumph ISO 4 into my rotation.  It’s one of the few shoes I seem to try each updated model.  In summary, I personally liked the original Triumph ISO the best.  As the shoe is updated more, I’ve found other Saucony shoes that I like better included the Freedom and even the cheaper Saucony Ride 10.

saucony triumph 4 shoe review

Fit:

The fit is different than the Triumph 3 and actually reminds me a lot more of both the original Triumph ISO and the Triumph ISO 2.  The shoe is actually a little longer than the 3, but still narrow.  Throughout the years, I’ve worn anywhere from a 9.5-10.5 wide in the Triumph.  This year, I find the 10 wide to be the best fit for me.

I found an interesting issue, I haven’t had before with the Triumph that the midfoot is much more snug.  Typically, I have liked the Triumph ISO, because it is a wider shoe model.  While there is sufficient room, I did find the updated model to be much narrower (even the wide) in the midfoot region.

Finally, if you have never run in Saucony shoes, the heel counter is much lower than other models.  I’ve never had an issue “running or slipping out of the shoe,” and don’t know anyone who has, but it is something to be aware of!  We have many people that come into work that don’t like the shoe because of the low heel.  It’s also a hard shoe to put orthotics and inserts into.

Ride:

The Saucony ISO 4 has gone through a few significant changes.  One is that the entire bottom is lined with the Everun foam.  Previous models included about half EVA and half Everrun.

Now, it’s full Evverun.

Why does this matter?  It makes the Saucony ISO 4 much firmer than previous models.  It’s has become much more responsive, but still cushioned shoe.  In fact, it’s much more similar to the Saucony Freedom.

Changing to an entire bottom of Everun means the shoe’s dynamic drastically changes.  If you have run in the Saucony  Freedom, it will feel much more similar.  The Triumph ISO 4 feels much less soft and much firmer than the previous Triumph models.

Summary:

  • I do personally like the Saucony Triumph ISO 4.  I’ve put just over 100 miles and not had an issue.  While the midfoot is tighter than previous models, it’s not uncomfortable.
  • The shoe itself does feel drastically different, both in fit as well as ride.  It’s definitely not a model of shoe I would buy blindly online.
  • Sadly, with the integration of the full bottom of Everrun, the retail price of the ISO 4 has gone up to $160.
  • Personally, I’ll continue running in it, and I think it’s one of the better versions Saucony has made in the last two years.  The original ISO was still my favorite.

Keep in mind, these are all personal preferences.  Saucony is not paying me to review their shoes.  What works for me, might not work for you.  All of our feet are different. 

Current Rotation:

Daily Runs: Saucony Triumph ISO 4, Brooks Glycerin 15 and Hoka Clifton 4
Workouts: Altra Escalante, Nike Zoom Fly
Races: Saucony Type A and Saucony Endorphin

Questions for you:
What is your favorite running shoe?
Is there a model, you’ve run through several models?

Why There is No Best Running Shoe

Why There is No Best Running Shoe

The best shoe doesn’t exist. 

It’s not the Nike 4% and it’s not the Brooks Leviviate.

Also, pumpkin spice lattes and unicorn frappucinos are not the best coffee…

But each of those has great marketing.

It’s no secret that every human is different, and thus, we have different feet.  Even your own two feet might be drastically different and that is okay.  Thinking out loud, that is why there are so many different shoes.

Why There is No Best Running Shoe

What works for me, might not work for you, and it certainly won’t work for everyone.  ‘

Some people thrive on minimal shoes, and other’s (like myself) thrive on maximum cushioned shoes.

Some need a lot of stability, and some need none. Stability and pronation is just one factor. A person’s foot shape has a lot to do with shoe selection too.

Each brand and style is cut a little different, and while most brands have both a narrow and wide option (some even double-wide), it’s important to realize you might wear a different size than you think.  I wear anywhere between a 9.5 wide to a size 11 depending on the cut of the actual shoe.

So then: “Why is There No Best Shoe”? 

The best shoe for you, depends on a few factors:

  • Foot shape
  • Personal gait cycle
  • What someone is doing in the shoes and their goals

Every running shoe is the best for someone.  Similarly, every running shoe is the worst for someone. 

A good pair of running shoes will cost you between $100-$120.  The cost isn’t because you are being ripped off, but because companies develop technology that cost that much to create, plus labor costs, etc.  There are plenty of shoes that cost more and even a few shoes that are a little less (for instance the Nike Pegasus).  Costing more does not make them a better shoe.

There are also plenty of ways to find sales on shoes such as older models or discontinued styles.  You might have to sacrifice the shape of the shoe matching your foot or older shoes tend to last less time.

As someone who works in a running store, I also tell people the best way to get a good shoe (for you) is to go get fitted for an appropriate pair.  Most local running stores employ people who run and know running.  The employees also tend to know the local area and can be a great resource.

For instance, on paper, I love a neutral high cushioned shoe.  If I were to shop online, I would think a shoe like the adidas ultra boost or Asics Nimbus would be a great option.  However, with the width of my foot, they never feel that great.  Getting fit for a pair of shoes, the first time I realized just how wide my feet are!

Running shoes are expensive, but it’s the most expensive part of the sport.  Once you find your shoe, you can find out when sales and deals are.  I always recommend signing up for your local running stores emails because they often have the best deals of any place! 

Questions for you:

What is your favorite running shoe?

What are shoes you’ve tried and have not worked?

New Balance 880 Shoe Review

New Balance 880 Shoe Review

I haven’t run in many New Balance Shoes since college.  Since working at a running store the last few years, I’ve tried New Balance shoes on, but I’ve never run a significant amount of mileage in them.  The only New Balance shoe I’ve tried in the past few years is the New Balance Fresh Foam Zante.

New Balance 880v7 shoe review

After a couple hundred miles, I realized it wasn’t enough cushion for me and looked cute so I made it a kick around shoe.  The 880v7 sells well at our store and it’s a comfortable shoe. Since I’ve been enjoying various models and brands lately, I thought it would be the perfect time to come back to the brand.  The 880 is a neutral shoe and lift weight shoe.  It’s the 7th version, but I haven’t run in any of the previous versions.

I’m not sponsored by New Balance, nor are they paying me to write this. My opinions are my own. 

Fit:

I haven’t run in previous models but based on trying previous versions I can tell the 880v7 is wider. The shoe itself comes in both wide and double wide.

Like many current styles of running shoes, the 880v7 has a seamless upper which accommodates bunions and wider feet.  New Balance is usually known to fit more full feet and to be honest, I find this to be one of the widest neutral shoes out there.  I usually wear 10-10.5 wide in shoes, and in the 880v7 I wear a 10 in the 880.

New Balance 880v7 shoe review

Ride:

The New Balance 880v7 has standard cushioning.  It’s not a minimal shoe or a high cushion shoe but somewhere in the middle.  It’s great for training for the mile or marathon, in fact recently Emma Coburn said it was one of her favorite shoes!  It must be good right?

The cushioning technology is called TRUFUSE which is softer than many other brands.  It has a 10 mm drop and weighs 9.2 ounces for women.  It feels a lot more cushioned than it is, and not as flat as many New Balance shoes.

New Balance 880v7 shoe review

I’ve run anywhere from 2-10 miles in the shoe and it feels good at both the beginning at the end of the run.  Compared to other brands, it does feel a little heavier on my foot. That’s not a bad thing.

Runs I’ve enjoyed the most for soft services such as trails and compacted snow.

Summary:

Right now, the 880v7 is in my rotation as a shoe for an everyday run.  I usually keep it to my days around an hour, but there isn’t a reason for that.

So far I’ve put just over 100 miles on the shoe, and it’s been good to me.  New Balance, themselves, have done a lot of fantastic updates with their shoes recently and definitely different from that stereotypical, “all white leather shoe” which they still make too.

Current Rotation:

Daily Runs: Brooks Glycerin 15, Hoka Clifton 4, Saucony Ride 10, and New Balance 880V7

Speed Work: Nike Zoom Fly, Altra Escalante

Racing: Saucony Type A or Endorphin

Questions for you:

What brand of shoe are you running the most in?

What is your favorite shoe?

Brooks Cascadia 12 Shoe Review

When going out west on Vacation, I knew I needed a trail shoe.  My husband and I have hiked several times on the east coast, but many people indicated how rocky and rigorous trails could be out west.  Thinking out loud, there have probably been times I could have used a trail shoe while hiking out east too.

brooks cascadia 12 shoe review

The Cascadia seemed like a good option.  I’ve had success with many Brooks Running shoes including both the Ghost 10 and Glycerin 15.  Instead of getting a hiking boot, I opted for the gortex (weatherproof) Brooks Cascadia.

Brooks Cascadia Fit:

The Gortex version makes the shoe stiffer and less breathable but that is precisely what I was looking for.  I wanted a shoe that would protect me from harsher elements.  That being said, it still fits appropriately.  In my running shoes, I’ve worn between 10-11 wide.  I purchased a pair of 10.5 shoes and have been fine.  The upper is constructed from a double mesh material that I found highly flexible, breathable, and provided a durable layer of protection.

brooks cascadia 12 shoe review

Brooks Cascadia Ride:

Personally, I’ve used these more for climbing and hiking versus running on trails.  I’ve used them a couple of times to run, but for the most part, they have been great hiking shoes.

There is a lot of cushion for a trail shoe.  My biggest fear was getting a trail shoe that was firm or rigid.  Since we have done 10+ miles of hiking before, my feet would not be happy with that.  The cushion of the Cascadia is soft like the Ghost but hard enough to grip the ground appropriately.

It doesn’t have the grooves of a rigorous hiking boot, but did have enough for the hikes I was doing.

The Gortex version allowed me to cross several streams without too much of an issue with my feet getting wet.  Something that was ideal.

Final Thoughts:

I like the Brooks Cascadia 12, and I’m so glad I decided to purchase it.  Since purchasing, I’ve done a variety of trails including Zion National Park, Colorado Springs, and even hiking in New Jersey.  It definitely makes a difference when hiking.  I’m glad I finally took the plunge and purchased a pair.

Questions for you:

Do you have a separate pair of trail shoes?

Have you ever used a Gortex or weatherproof product?

Nike Zoom Fly Review

When Nike created the “breaking 2 project”, they created two shoes: the Nike Zoom Fly and the Nike Zoom Vapor Fly 4%.  The Nike Zoom Fly retails at $150, while the Zoom Fly 4% comes in at $250.  That is, if you can find a pair of Zoom Vapor fly 4% in your size.

The Zoom fly is a bit heavier and made for the everyday runner (or any runner not trying to break 2 hours in the marathon).

It’s made more for training.  When we first brought them into work, I wanted to try them because “everyone was”, however, I had plenty of shoes in my rotation.  Waiting enough time also gave me the option to buy a flashy red colorway too.

Nike Voom fly red

Fit:

The Zoom Fly is more narrow than many of Nikes training shoes including the Pegasus and Vomero.  The upper is seamless so it’s able to fit wider feet.  They don’t make either in a “wide”.  I bought a women’s size 10 which is fine, but I do believe a 10 wide would be a slightly better fit.

Nike Voom fly red

Ride:

The shoe weighs about 8.75 ounces for men and 6.5 for ladies.  While it’s not the lightest, it’s definitely a lighter shoe.

The Zoom Fly has  10 mm heel-toe drop so it isn’t minimal either.  The focus of the shoe is for “everyday” training.  It’s not the shoe meant to run sub 2 hours in a marathon but the shoe to keep you healthy during training.  Nike is in the process of changing many of their running shoes to the new technology you see in the Zoom Fly and Zoom Vapor Fly.

I’ve run just over 100 miles on it and I like the fit and feel a lot.  It’s soft and cushioned but not too squishy.  It’s responsive enough that I like to do workouts in it without my feet feeling too beat up.  I was doing workouts in either the Saucony Type A or the Altra Escalante but have found the extra cushion to be nice and better to recover faster.

One thing I will say is, similar to the Nike Lunarglide, there isn’t a whole lot of traction at the bottom.  On a rainy day or mud, be prepared to not feel as much contact with the ground.

Nike Voom fly red

Finally, something I shouldn’t comment on but I will is these are a good looking pair of shoes.  It’s always fun to run in a shoe that you’re like…wow these are sharp.

Personally, I see the Nike Zoom Fly as a tempo, speed, or racing shoe.  While I know many people who do the bulk of their mileage in the Zoom Fly, I personally need more cushion.

Current Rotation:
Saucony Freedom (daily runs, easy runs)
Brooks Glycerin (daily runs, easy runs)
Brooks Levitate (easy runs)
Hoka Clifton 4 (daily runs, easy runs)
Nike Zoom fly (workouts)
Altra Escalante (workouts)
Saucony type A/Endorphin (racing)

Questions for you:
Did you watch the Nike Sub 2 hours documentary?
What is your current favorite running shoe?

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