New Balance 1080v9 Shoe Review

New Balance 1080v9 Shoe Review

The New Balance 1080v8 was the first New Balance shoe I fell in love with. It’s high cushioned, with a nice roomy toe box.  I  got through the bulk of NYCM training in them and was sad to finally retire the pair. Naturally, I was excited when the New Balance 1080v9 came out. I knew I would probably like it just as much, spoiler I did.

New Balance 1080v9

Weight: Men’s 11.1 oz | Women’s 9.9 oz
Drop: 8 mm 

Fit:

The major update for the 1080v9 comes with the upper.  The upper for the 1080v9 is much more simple. New Balance removed the conventional mesh with many overlays, seams, and plastic for an engineered jacquard mesh.  The jacquard mesh or fancy mesh has no seams or overlay.  In all, version 9 is much sleeker.

New Balance 1080v9

Included in the fit, was the removal of the bulky tongue as well as a molded 3D heel design.  The premise is to lock your heal into place.  I think it fits my foot well, but working in run specialty, I’ve had a few people that don’t care for how it hits their ankle. I’ve run over 100 miles in the shoes, and haven’t had any issues.  Typically I wear a 10-11 wide, and the 10.5 regular width is fine.

A great feature of the shoe, is the logo “N” is reflective.

New Balance 1080v9

Ride:

The update also includes the removal of about an ounce of weight. While that doesn’t sound like a lot, it makes a huge difference in how you feel while running in the shoe.  The lighter weight V9 now feels softer in the midsole, and there is more cushion and response at the forefront.

New Balance 1080v9

With plenty of cushion, it’s a great option for easy days, recovery days, or just daily runs. For me personally, it fits best on any of the 3.  The traction is there so when we had a snow storm a few days ago, I was able to run without feeling like I’m sliding around.  If you have liked the 1080 in the past, you will like it for version 9. If you have never run in the New Balance 1080 and are looking for a high cushioned trainer, the 1080v9 is a great fit.  Even though it’s high cushion, it doesn’t lack the response of a lighter weight trainer.

New Balance 1080v9

Recent Shoe Reviews:

Daily Rotation: Brooks Glycerin 16, Saucony Triumph 5, On Cloudace
Workouts: Nike LT Streak (speed), Hoka Cavu 2 (long run tempos)
Races: Nike LT Streak, Nike Zoom Fly

You Can See All Shoe Reviews Here.

Questions for you:
What is your favorite running shoe?
Have you run in New Balance before? 

 

Nike Streak Lt 4 Shoe Review

Nike Streak Lt 4 Shoe Review

I’ve got a few new shoe reviews coming out soon.  Some of my favorite shoes have been updated, but I’ve also branched out to try a few new ones as well.

Anyway, I rarely do a running flat review, because they are all basically the same. Lightweight, used for racing.  With the release of the Nike Vaporfly 4% last year, the running flat game has changed.

Nike Streak Lt 4 Shoe Review

That being said, I’ve been a Nike LT Streak fan since it the first version came out. Something about putting on a brand new pair has always made me feel fast. It’s a lightweight, racing shoe, that has been great for both workouts and races. I’ve done everything from 400s to a half marathon and never had any issues. That being said, it’s so important to work yourself into a flat. Don’t go from a trainer to a half marathon because you will get injured.

Nike Streak Lt 4 Shoe Review

Fit:

Like any racing flat, the Nike Streak LT fits narrow.  I wear from a women’s 10-11 wide. Since the shoe is unisex, I found the mens 9.5 to fit the best (women’s 11).

New for the Streak LT 4, is a Flymesh upper.  According to Nike, the Flymesh makes the shoe more durable as well as breathable. There are also vents along the forefoot and sides to eliminate hotspots.

I appreciate this year, the overlays that give the shoe more overall structure.  It’s not you’re your foot is just free floating around in a shoe. Of all the versions of the Streak LT, I think the 4th version fits the best. It has the most structure and your feet feel most secure in a flat.

Ride:

The Air Zoom Streak LT 4 is one of the lightest racing flats out there. It’s possibly what drew me to this shoe way back when. Lighter (whether it’s body weight or racing shoe), doesn’t mean faster, especially in distance. The Lt Streak hits a good spot with about the most amount of cushion for the least amount of weight.

So how is it so light? Nike uses a Cushlon LT midsole, aided further by “Zoom Air” in the shoe’s heel. The cushioning is durable for paved roads, track, and trails.  While I personally wouldn’t do a fast workout with them on the treadmill, they should be fine there too.

Nike Streak Lt 4 Shoe Review

The Air Zoom Streak LT 4 is a 4mm drop.  This is a drastic difference between most trainers so if you’re using them for the first time, take a few weeks or workouts to get used to them. The lower drop allows the foot to move more natural and there isn’t additional support there. You feel more of the road or terrain.

Another important feature to look for in a racing flat: traction without weight. This is one of Nike’s best “bad weather” racing shoe (unless you race in a trainer).  I’ve run races like Shamrock in torrential downpours and slicker conditions and still had traction.  Not every racing flat is great in bad weather and both the Nike Zoom Fly and 4% do not perform well in rain.

Conclusion:

I like the Zoom Streak LT 4 and will continue to use them.  Typically I go through 2 pairs of racing flats a year.  They last 100-200 miles (as most racing flats do before your cushioning is gone).

Nike Streak Lt 4 Shoe Review

Current Rotation:

Easy Runs: Hoka Cavu, Brooks Glycerin, Saucony Triumph ISO 5 (shoe review to come)

Workouts: Nike LT Streak 4, Nike Zoom Fly

Races: Nike LT Streak 4, (I think the Vaporfly will just be a marathon shoe for me and I have no plans to do another one for a while)

Questions for you:

Do you use different racing and training shoes?

What is your favorite racing shoe? 

 

On Cloudrush Shoe Review

On Cloudrush Shoe Review

In my quest to find a more cushioned shoe for the marathon I decided to try the On Cloudrush!  Weighing roughly 8.1 ounces, the Cloudrush is a more substantial shoe for workouts and racing than what I’m used too.  As I mentioned during my training, one thing I’ve done to stay healthier is to use shoes with more substance and cushion.

On cloudrush shoe review

On Cloudrush Fit:

On generally run narrow and the Cloudrush is no exception.  Something good (for me anyway), like many racing oriented shoes, is it unisex sizing.   

Fit wise; I’m usually anywhere between a women’s size 10-11 wide. Since they are unisex, I chose the 9.5 and was fine but width and length.

The Cloudrush is almost all mesh.  It’s lightweight and breathable, but at the same time, it allows moisture into the shoe much quicker.  That being said, most people are racing or doing workouts in the shoe so it’s not as if you’ll go run a 30-mile muddy trail race in them.

The lightweight mesh also allows for the shoe to be much lighter and a lot of breathability. Every part of the upper is thin and lightweight, from the toebox to the laces, to the tongue.  The shoe was made to run fast.

On cloudrush shoe review

On Cloudrush Ride:

The On Cloudrush is both responsive and soft. That is a weird thing to type. If you’ve never run in an On shoe, their technology uses small rubber pods on the bottom of the shoe that each adapt to the needs of a runner.

The Cloudrush has 18 pods. Each pod collapses and compress when the runner strikes the pavement. So if you hit more on the heel, the heel pods will compress to your stride. If you strike the forefront, the forefront will collapse more. The pods make for a much more personalized ride.

On cloudrush shoe review

I like how light the Cloudrush is but that it still provides cushion.  Many true flats have little to no cushion, but I do appreciate the substance of the shoe.  Throughout the last month, I’ve done several runs in the shoe ranging from an easy run to 400s, to a tempo run.  For me, I think they are best suited for a tempo run.  I think I appreciate more cushion for a long race, but I do believe a lot of people would like this the On Cloudrush for either a half or full marathon.

On cloudrush shoe review

On Cloudrush Conclusions

I like the Cloudrush, and I will continue to use it for workouts (at this point after New York).  It’s lightweight and responsive but also well cushioned. For me, it’s an excellent combination for workouts.

It’s definitely a good half to full marathon shoe.

Shoe Rotation:

Easy Runs/Daily Runs: On CloudaceHoka Cavu, Hoka Clifton 5, Brooks Glycerin 16,

Workouts: On Cloudrush, Nike Pegasus Turbo, Nike Fly

Races: Nike Fly

Questions for you:

Marathoners, what is your shoe of choice?

Do you have a favorite shoe? 

Hoka One One Cavu

Hoka One One Cavu

The Hoka Cavu is a new model from Hoka.  It’s one of their lightest models that can be used for racing, training, or workouts.  It’s quickly become one of my more favorite running shoes.

If you are looking for a “beginner” Hoka shoe, the Cavu, as well as the Clifton 5 and Mach, are good options depending on your foot type.

The Hoka One One Cavu has a broad range of use.  It can be used for daily runs, to workouts, and races.  I don’t think I would use it as my go-to 5k shoe, but it’s a solid marathon shoe.

In February, Hoka launched three new lighter models in their “Profly line.”  It included the Cavu, Mach, and Evelon. The Cavu is designed to be the fastest of the shoes.  I’ve used it for both workouts and daily runs, and I prefer it for workouts.

Hoka one one cavu shoe review

Fit:

Like many running shoes now, the Cavu has an all mesh upper.  This makes the fit better for someone with wider feet or someone with bunions.  It fits very similar to the Mach, but with the seamless mesh, fits wider feet. I wear a women’s 10-11 wide and the size 10.5 has fit fine.

Hoka one one cavu shoe review

Ride:

The Hoka One One Cavu is designed to be a fast shoe.  Personally, it’s too much shoe for me on race day. However, it’s a lot less shoe than the Clifton or Bondi.  If you train in the Clifton, both the Cavu or even Mach are shoes to look at one race day.

All three of the Hoka “Profly shoes” use new “Profly” technology.

What is that? It is designed with a softer heel for shock absorption and a firmer forefoot for propulsion and energy return. The Cavu has a much softer heel. However, the forefront is firm.  It’s a much more responsive shoe than the Clifton and even the Mach.  Like any Hoka model, it still uses the “rocker” technology that you feel like you are being propelled forward.

Keep in mind, how you run will play a significant effect on how you feel the technology in the shoe.  That isn’t a bad thing but those who run on the forefront might feel a firmer shoe, and those towards the heel will feel a softer version.

Hoka one one cavu shoe review

Hoka One One Cavu Conclusion:

In all, I think the Hoka Cavu is a great choice for workouts, and I enjoy it.  In fact, right now it’s one of my staple shoes, and I find myself wanting to run it more often than not.  In fact, I believe I have already put over 150 miles in them. It is light and durable and a great racing shoe for anyone already using a substantial Hoka model.

Shoe Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Brooks Glycerin, New Balance 1080, On Cloudace

Workouts: New Balance 1400, Nike Fly

Races: Nike Fly, Nike LT Racer

Questions for you:

What shoe do you race in?

What is your favorite running shoe? 

New Balance 1400 Shoe Review

New Balance 1400 Shoe Review

Despite never running in the New Balance 1400, I’m familiar with it.  It’s been a favorite shoe for several of my coworkers who prefer racing marathons.  It won’t be my marathon shoe (which is still undecided), but it’s been good to do long runs and workouts in.

The New Balance 1400 is a great racing flat for anything from the 5k to the marathon. It’s been around for several updates and designs as well.  I’ve tried on the shoe (as I like to do with every shoe), through each version but never run in it until now.

new balance 1400 v5 shoe review

Fit:

I wear a size 10-11 wide in running shoes, and the 10.5 womens is fine.  Often times I need to just scratch women’s racing flats and go to a unisex/ men’s shoe because of my foot width.  The women’s 10.5 is fine.

New Balance 1400 v6 show review

Other bonuses of the flat include minimal seams and overlays. Less weight, less rubbing, equals faster runner.  There is only so much actual cushion you can remove from a flat, so many companies are removing as much stuff from the top as possible.

Also included in the fit is an update to the tongue. While I did not run in the previous version, but I know the tongue bothered several people.  Many people said it bunched up or caused irritation.

The updated tongue is more similar to the New Balance track spikes.  I suppose if Emma Coburn and other New Balance professionals like the tongue of a shoe, the common folks like us can too.

New Balance 1400 v6 show review

Ride:

There isn’t much to say about the ride.  It’s light, responsive and reacts with the ground.  The material used, is called “revlite.” It’s durable yet responsive.  It’s much more responsive than fresh foam (like in my favorite New Balance trainer the 1080).

Interesting and somewhat unique of the 1400 is that is has a 10 mm drop (many flats have between 0-4). You don’t really feel the difference and to be honest, if no one told me I would never know. I have preferred it recently for long tempos and longer runs.  I’ve done some short 400s too, but longer runs seem to be my favorite.

New Balance 1400 v6 show review

Finally, something to note is that it responds well in rain. When a racing flat is not good in weather, it can be a shock come race day and you don’t have a good shoe.  (Some shoes that don’t respond well to rain include the Nike Fly and Brooks Levitate). I’ve raced A LOT of road races in the pouring rain including Shamrock, Atlantic City, and Broad Street. If I didn’t have a good racing shoe that day, I now know this is always a faithful weather backup. In fact, one of my better photos in the shoe is in bad weather.

Conclusion:

In all I like the New Balance 1400 for workouts and races.  In bad/wet weather I believe I am more likely to use the shoe because it has more traction than the Nike Fly and many other flats.

New Balance 1400 v6 show review

Current Rotation:

Workouts/Racing: Nike Fly, New Balance 1400

Daily Runs: Brooks Glycerin, New Balance 1080, On Cloudace,

Long Runs/Faster Runs: Hoka One One Cavu, Underarmour Sonic

Questions for you:

What is your staple racing shoe?

Do you change shoes in the weather?

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