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Hoka One One Cavu

Hoka One One Cavu

The Hoka Cavu is a new model from Hoka.  It’s one of their lightest models that can be used for racing, training, or workouts.  It’s quickly become one of my more favorite running shoes.

If you are looking for a “beginner” Hoka shoe, the Cavu, as well as the Clifton 5 and Mach, are good options depending on your foot type.

The Hoka One One Cavu has a broad range of use.  It can be used for daily runs, to workouts, and races.  I don’t think I would use it as my go-to 5k shoe, but it’s a solid marathon shoe.

In February, Hoka launched three new lighter models in their “Profly line.”  It included the Cavu, Mach, and Evelon. The Cavu is designed to be the fastest of the shoes.  I’ve used it for both workouts and daily runs, and I prefer it for workouts.

Hoka one one cavu shoe review

Fit:

Like many running shoes now, the Cavu has an all mesh upper.  This makes the fit better for someone with wider feet or someone with bunions.  It fits very similar to the Mach, but with the seamless mesh, fits wider feet. I wear a women’s 10-11 wide and the size 10.5 has fit fine.

Hoka one one cavu shoe review

Ride:

The Hoka One One Cavu is designed to be a fast shoe.  Personally, it’s too much shoe for me on race day. However, it’s a lot less shoe than the Clifton or Bondi.  If you train in the Clifton, both the Cavu or even Mach are shoes to look at one race day.

All three of the Hoka “Profly shoes” use new “Profly” technology.

What is that? It is designed with a softer heel for shock absorption and a firmer forefoot for propulsion and energy return. The Cavu has a much softer heel. However, the forefront is firm.  It’s a much more responsive shoe than the Clifton and even the Mach.  Like any Hoka model, it still uses the “rocker” technology that you feel like you are being propelled forward.

Keep in mind, how you run will play a significant effect on how you feel the technology in the shoe.  That isn’t a bad thing but those who run on the forefront might feel a firmer shoe, and those towards the heel will feel a softer version.

Hoka one one cavu shoe review

Hoka One One Cavu Conclusion:

In all, I think the Hoka Cavu is a great choice for workouts, and I enjoy it.  In fact, right now it’s one of my staple shoes, and I find myself wanting to run it more often than not.  In fact, I believe I have already put over 150 miles in them. It is light and durable and a great racing shoe for anyone already using a substantial Hoka model.

Shoe Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Brooks Glycerin, New Balance 1080, On Cloudace

Workouts: New Balance 1400, Nike Fly

Races: Nike Fly, Nike LT Racer

Questions for you:

What shoe do you race in?

What is your favorite running shoe? 

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New Balance 1400 Shoe Review

New Balance 1400 Shoe Review

Despite never running in the New Balance 1400, I’m familiar with it.  It’s been a favorite shoe for several of my coworkers who prefer racing marathons.  It won’t be my marathon shoe (which is still undecided), but it’s been good to do long runs and workouts in.

The New Balance 1400 is a great racing flat for anything from the 5k to the marathon. It’s been around for several updates and designs as well.  I’ve tried on the shoe (as I like to do with every shoe), through each version but never run in it until now.

new balance 1400 v5 shoe review

Fit:

I wear a size 10-11 wide in running shoes, and the 10.5 womens is fine.  Often times I need to just scratch women’s racing flats and go to a unisex/ men’s shoe because of my foot width.  The women’s 10.5 is fine.

New Balance 1400 v6 show review

Other bonuses of the flat include minimal seams and overlays. Less weight, less rubbing, equals faster runner.  There is only so much actual cushion you can remove from a flat, so many companies are removing as much stuff from the top as possible.

Also included in the fit is an update to the tongue. While I did not run in the previous version, but I know the tongue bothered several people.  Many people said it bunched up or caused irritation.

The updated tongue is more similar to the New Balance track spikes.  I suppose if Emma Coburn and other New Balance professionals like the tongue of a shoe, the common folks like us can too.

New Balance 1400 v6 show review

Ride:

There isn’t much to say about the ride.  It’s light, responsive and reacts with the ground.  The material used, is called “revlite.” It’s durable yet responsive.  It’s much more responsive than fresh foam (like in my favorite New Balance trainer the 1080).

Interesting and somewhat unique of the 1400 is that is has a 10 mm drop (many flats have between 0-4). You don’t really feel the difference and to be honest, if no one told me I would never know. I have preferred it recently for long tempos and longer runs.  I’ve done some short 400s too, but longer runs seem to be my favorite.

New Balance 1400 v6 show review

Finally, something to note is that it responds well in rain. When a racing flat is not good in weather, it can be a shock come race day and you don’t have a good shoe.  (Some shoes that don’t respond well to rain include the Nike Fly and Brooks Levitate). I’ve raced A LOT of road races in the pouring rain including Shamrock, Atlantic City, and Broad Street. If I didn’t have a good racing shoe that day, I now know this is always a faithful weather backup. In fact, one of my better photos in the shoe is in bad weather.

Conclusion:

In all I like the New Balance 1400 for workouts and races.  In bad/wet weather I believe I am more likely to use the shoe because it has more traction than the Nike Fly and many other flats.

New Balance 1400 v6 show review

Current Rotation:

Workouts/Racing: Nike Fly, New Balance 1400

Daily Runs: Brooks Glycerin, New Balance 1080, On Cloudace,

Long Runs/Faster Runs: Hoka One One Cavu, Underarmour Sonic

Questions for you:

What is your staple racing shoe?

Do you change shoes in the weather?

Underarmour Horizon BPF Trail Running Shoe Review

Underarmour Horizon BPF Trail Running Shoe Review

Recently, I tried the Underamour Horizon Trail shoe.  Between the Underamour Sonic and the Trail Horizon BPF, it has been my first time logging significant mileage in an Underamour shoe.

I’ve wanted to try both the street shoes: the Bandit as well as the Sonic.  Anyway, at the Copper Mountain Trail race, I tried them on and thought they felt very comfortable.  As poor of an idea as it was, after my initial try on, I thought they were extremely comfortable, and I raced in them.  They felt great, and as most people know, I had a good race.  So yes, my first time running in the shoe was the Copper Mountain 25k.  They did well and I would 100% wear them again for the race.  It is definitely not something I recommend with any shoe, but they felt great and I couldn’t be more pleased.  I also recently raced the Killington 25k and they were just as good.

underarmour Horizon BPF shoe review

Underarmour Horizon BPF Fit:

I typically wear between a women’s size 10-11 wide.  I found the women’s 11 to be the most comfortable on my foot.  It’s relatively true to size.

The upper of the Under Armour Horizon is durable and is very breathable.  Since the primary function is a trail running shoe, it also provides a lot of protection from rocks and trail debris.  The great part is it’s waterproof which came in handy when I was plowing through mud puddles in Killington.

underarmour Horizon BPF shoe review

Ride:

The outsole has a high-traction rubber which is actually designed by Michelob tires.  So yes, the same rubber your tires have, your shoes have.  Most people know I’m incredibly clumsy and I found the shoe to grip every part of the trail.  I never felt as though there was a surface I couldn’t handle.  I found the rubber extremely helpful for Killington and I’m not sure how well I would have done with something less aggressive.

But the shoe is not all rubber! The Underamour Horizon also has plenty of cushioning and is both soft and lightweight. It is not as rigid as many trail running shoes and provides plenty of cushion during your run.  I like the shoe a lot for running because it’s soft and relatively light for a trail shoe, with plenty of traction.

underarmour Horizon BPF shoe review

Conclusion:

Right now, this is my favorite trail running shoe.  I also own the Brooks Cascadia which I find better for hiking but the Underamour Horizon better for running on trails.  If you are looking for a good, sturdy trail shoe, I would definitely look into this shoe.  It will probably stay my primary trail racing shoe (when I do trails).

Questions for you:
Do you run trails?  What is your favorite trail shoe?
What is your favorite running shoe?

Diadora Fly Shoe Review

Diadora Fly Shoe Review

Before a few months ago, when I thought of the brand Diadora, I thought of soccer shoes.  Even fashion shoes, but definitely not running.

Diadora is an Italian company that is slowly breaking into the running industry.  If you are local, they are creating their US headquarters in Camden, NJ.  Pretty cool since most running brands are based out of the West Coast or Boston area.

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Ride:

Diadora has designed the midsole with their “Blushield technology”.  What does this mean? The BlueShield technology is designed to provide dynamic stability.  So it’s stable when you need it and not when you don’t. This is especially good if one-foot pronates more than the other or your gait drastically changes at the finish of the run.

Diadora Fly Shoe Review

It’s very soft and cushioned.  I like how light and responsive it is. One thing I appreciated is right out of the box, the shoe felt great. I never felt as though I needed to “adjust to them” or “break them in”.  You shouldn’t feel like that anyway, but I felt good when I added these to my rotation.

There is plenty of cushioning in both the heel and forefront of the shoe to absorb the impact. Even with all of the cushioning, you still maintain a lot of contact with the ground, and they are responsive.

Fit:

As far as running shoes go, these are one of the widest brands out there.  They are cut on an overall more full and straight last.  Typically I wear a women size 10-11 wide, and the regular 10 felt bigger than any other 10 I’ve worn.  I stuck with the 10, and it’s a good fit for me.

The upper has no seems which is great for someone with bunions. It is lightweight and breathable.  I don’t have any complaints.

Diadora Fly Shoe Review

Conclusion:

I was pleasantly surprised and like the Diadora Fly.  You won’t find a lot of information online about them, because they are newer to the running scene.  In fact, local to me in New Jersey they are available to Philly Runner, Haddonfield RunningCo, Runners High, and Brooklyn Runner.  Diadora is a high-quality brand, and I’m enjoying them.  I hope they continue to stay in the industry.

If you like the Brooks Ghost, Brooks Launch, Saucony Ride, Saucony Kinvara, Mizuno or Wave Rider, New Balance 1400, or Nike Pegasus they might fit nicely into your rotation.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Mach, Saucony Ride ISO, Brooks Glycerin 15

Workouts: Nike Fly, Saucony Type A

Races: Nike Fly, Saucony Type A

Questions for you:

Have you ever worn a smaller brand?

What is your current favorite shoe?

ON Cloudflow Shoe Review

ON Cloudflow Shoe Review

Recently, I decided to add another shoe into my rotation.  I haven’t run in ON for a couple of years, but I thought it would be fun to add.  The Cloudflow is a lightweight neutral shoe.  The Swiss company, ON, is known for their looks of a running shoe and they impress many.

ON Cloudflow Shoe Review

ON Cloudflow Upper Info

The brand, ON, is narrow with all of their shoes.  I would personally benefit from them making a wider last. However, the Cloudflow fits comfortably.  Typically I wear size 10-11 wide shoes, and a 10is fine.  Despite being more narrow, the Cloudflow does fit more true to size than many brands.

The upper itself is seamless and moves with your foot.  It accommodates wider widths as well as bunions well.  In all, it’s not a bad fit.

ON Cloudflow Shoe Review

ON Cloudflow Ride:

I like the brand, ON, because their technology in shoes is noticeable and apparent. The sole uses a “Cloud-Tec sole,” which uses 18 individual “clouds” to displace pressure.  Since the “clouds” are hallow, the shoe is very light.

A few things about the “Cloud-Tec” sole that makes me hesitant:

  • It collects rocks. If you run on gravel, dirt, or even road, you will probably collect a few at the bottom.
  • It doesn’t grip well to ice or in inclement conditions.

I’ve run a few workouts as well as 10 miles, and they’ve been fine in those situations.Personally, I do like the Cloudflow but prefer it for ideal conditions or the treadmill.  I find it best suited there.  For me, this is an excellent shoe for longer workouts or faster workouts.  I’ve used it for everything from a 6-mile tempo to a 10-mile easy run, and I think the best place in my rotation is tempo runs.  It feels more connected to the ground than many brands.

ON Cloudflow Conclusions

I like the ON Cloudflow, and I believe it has a place in my rotation.  I think it’s a good lightweight shoe.  It reminds me a lot of lighter adidas shoes.

Other shoes in my rotation:

Easy/Long Runs: Brooks Glycerin, Hoka Mach, Saucony Ride

Workouts: Nike Zoom Fly, ON Cloudflow

Races: Saucony Type A, Nike Zoom fly

Questions for you:

Have you tried ON Running shoes?

What is your current favorite shoe?

Saucony Triumph ISO 4 Shoe Review

Saucony Triumph ISO 4 Shoe Review

Recently, I integrated the Saucony Triumph ISO 4 into my rotation.  It’s one of the few shoes I seem to try each updated model.  In summary, I personally liked the original Triumph ISO the best.  As the shoe is updated more, I’ve found other Saucony shoes that I like better included the Freedom and even the cheaper Saucony Ride 10.

saucony triumph 4 shoe review

Fit:

The fit is different than the Triumph 3 and actually reminds me a lot more of both the original Triumph ISO and the Triumph ISO 2.  The shoe is actually a little longer than the 3, but still narrow.  Throughout the years, I’ve worn anywhere from a 9.5-10.5 wide in the Triumph.  This year, I find the 10 wide to be the best fit for me.

I found an interesting issue, I haven’t had before with the Triumph that the midfoot is much more snug.  Typically, I have liked the Triumph ISO, because it is a wider shoe model.  While there is sufficient room, I did find the updated model to be much narrower (even the wide) in the midfoot region.

Finally, if you have never run in Saucony shoes, the heel counter is much lower than other models.  I’ve never had an issue “running or slipping out of the shoe,” and don’t know anyone who has, but it is something to be aware of!  We have many people that come into work that don’t like the shoe because of the low heel.  It’s also a hard shoe to put orthotics and inserts into.

Ride:

The Saucony ISO 4 has gone through a few significant changes.  One is that the entire bottom is lined with the Everun foam.  Previous models included about half EVA and half Everrun.

Now, it’s full Evverun.

Why does this matter?  It makes the Saucony ISO 4 much firmer than previous models.  It’s has become much more responsive, but still cushioned shoe.  In fact, it’s much more similar to the Saucony Freedom.

Changing to an entire bottom of Everun means the shoe’s dynamic drastically changes.  If you have run in the Saucony  Freedom, it will feel much more similar.  The Triumph ISO 4 feels much less soft and much firmer than the previous Triumph models.

Summary:

  • I do personally like the Saucony Triumph ISO 4.  I’ve put just over 100 miles and not had an issue.  While the midfoot is tighter than previous models, it’s not uncomfortable.
  • The shoe itself does feel drastically different, both in fit as well as ride.  It’s definitely not a model of shoe I would buy blindly online.
  • Sadly, with the integration of the full bottom of Everrun, the retail price of the ISO 4 has gone up to $160.
  • Personally, I’ll continue running in it, and I think it’s one of the better versions Saucony has made in the last two years.  The original ISO was still my favorite.

Keep in mind, these are all personal preferences.  Saucony is not paying me to review their shoes.  What works for me, might not work for you.  All of our feet are different. 

Current Rotation:

Daily Runs: Saucony Triumph ISO 4, Brooks Glycerin 15 and Hoka Clifton 4
Workouts: Altra Escalante, Nike Zoom Fly
Races: Saucony Type A and Saucony Endorphin

Questions for you:
What is your favorite running shoe?
Is there a model, you’ve run through several models?

Why There is No Best Running Shoe

Why There is No Best Running Shoe

The best shoe doesn’t exist. 

It’s not the Nike 4% and it’s not the Brooks Leviviate.

Also, pumpkin spice lattes and unicorn frappucinos are not the best coffee…

But each of those has great marketing.

It’s no secret that every human is different, and thus, we have different feet.  Even your own two feet might be drastically different and that is okay.  Thinking out loud, that is why there are so many different shoes.

Why There is No Best Running Shoe

What works for me, might not work for you, and it certainly won’t work for everyone.  ‘

Some people thrive on minimal shoes, and other’s (like myself) thrive on maximum cushioned shoes.

Some need a lot of stability, and some need none. Stability and pronation is just one factor. A person’s foot shape has a lot to do with shoe selection too.

Each brand and style is cut a little different, and while most brands have both a narrow and wide option (some even double-wide), it’s important to realize you might wear a different size than you think.  I wear anywhere between a 9.5 wide to a size 11 depending on the cut of the actual shoe.

So then: “Why is There No Best Shoe”? 

The best shoe for you, depends on a few factors:

  • Foot shape
  • Personal gait cycle
  • What someone is doing in the shoes and their goals

Every running shoe is the best for someone.  Similarly, every running shoe is the worst for someone. 

A good pair of running shoes will cost you between $100-$120.  The cost isn’t because you are being ripped off, but because companies develop technology that cost that much to create, plus labor costs, etc.  There are plenty of shoes that cost more and even a few shoes that are a little less (for instance the Nike Pegasus).  Costing more does not make them a better shoe.

There are also plenty of ways to find sales on shoes such as older models or discontinued styles.  You might have to sacrifice the shape of the shoe matching your foot or older shoes tend to last less time.

As someone who works in a running store, I also tell people the best way to get a good shoe (for you) is to go get fitted for an appropriate pair.  Most local running stores employ people who run and know running.  The employees also tend to know the local area and can be a great resource.

For instance, on paper, I love a neutral high cushioned shoe.  If I were to shop online, I would think a shoe like the adidas ultra boost or Asics Nimbus would be a great option.  However, with the width of my foot, they never feel that great.  Getting fit for a pair of shoes, the first time I realized just how wide my feet are!

Running shoes are expensive, but it’s the most expensive part of the sport.  Once you find your shoe, you can find out when sales and deals are.  I always recommend signing up for your local running stores emails because they often have the best deals of any place! 

Questions for you:

What is your favorite running shoe?

What are shoes you’ve tried and have not worked?

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