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Asics Nimbus 22

Asics Nimbus 22

Asics Nimbus 22 Shoe Review:

Well…it’s been a long long time since I’ve run consistently in any Asics shoe. The Asics Nimbus 22 is the first shoe in several years that has worked for me from Asics. I used to run a lot of mileage in the Asics Nimbus but Asics got too narrow for my feet and they no longer felt comfortable.  The Asics Nimbus 21 made significant improvement over previous versions, but the Asics Gel Nimbus 22 is even better.

The Asics Nimbus 22 is a high cushion, neutral shoe. The Asics Nimbus been around 22 running shoe generations and is known for the gel and soft cushioning, shock absorption, and gel technology. It’s been a staple of neutral runners for years.

asics gel nimbus 22 shoe review

Asics Nimbus 22 Fit:

The updated Asics Nimbus 22 finally has a more roomy toebox. It’s not a wide shoe by any means, but it runs more true to size. For several years of the Asics Nimbus, the shoe fit almost a size and width short. So most people not only went up a half size-full size, they also went wider to get an appropriate fit.

The Asics Nimbus 22 update now uses a monofilament engineered mesh upper. The jacquard mesh provides excellent moisture management and a high level of breathability.

Plus it provides a more roomy toebox and breathability of the shoe.  The mesh upper is more durable and just fits better.  The heel counter fits better for the Asics Gel Nimbus 22 as well.

asics gel nimbus 22 shoe review

Asics Nimbus 22 Ride:

The Asics Nimbus 22 has always been well known for the premium cushion. It has plenty of cushion to protect the body. The updated version of the Asics Nimbus 22 uses a thicker version of Asics softest and most resilient midsole foam. Plus now, the Asics Nimbus 22 has wrap around gel cushioning in the heel and better-shaped gel inserts in the forefront.

The new wrap-around gel allows your Asics Nimbus 22 to protect your feet no matter how the foot strikes. Whether you are a forefront runner or heel striker, you are going to get the cushion you need. The transition from heel to toe is a lot more seamless as well and it feels less clunky.

How does the Asics Nimbus 22 feel less clunky? The Asics Nimbus 22 now uses Flytefoam Lyte Propel foam.  What is Flytefoam Propel Technology? While it’s also a mouthful, Flytefoam Propel foam is lighter, with a soft and energetic return. The Asics Nimbus 22 now has 2 mm more of this foam.

With the updated Asics Nimbus 22, it’s less rigid. The gel in the Asics Nimbus, made the shoe firmer and less flexible. The deep flex grooves allow the Asics Nimbus to be more flexible and move with your foot.

asics gel nimbus 22 shoe review

Asics Nimbus 22 Conclusion: 
I’ve run just over 100 miles in the updated Asics Nimbus 22 and for me, it fits nicely into an easy run or recovery run day. I like the Asics Nimbus 22, and this is the best update they’ve had in several years.

me asics gel nimbus 22 shoe review

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Bondi 6,  Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

Have you run in the Asics Nimbus 22?

What is a staple running shoe you use?

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New Balance 890v7 Shoe Review

New Balance 890v7 Shoe Review

New Balance 890v7 Shoe Review:

The New Balance 890v7 was the last shoe I tried before deciding what I wanted to wear for the New York City Marathon. While I like the New Balance 890v7, it feels more like a tempo running shoe or trainer to me. I wanted something a little more responsive so I decided the New Balance Fuelcell Rebel was my go-to.

New Balance 890v7 Shoe Review

When someone asks: “did my running shoe change much,” usually the answer is no. Between the New Balance 890v6 to the New Balance 890v7, it changed a lot. The latest update is over an ounce lighter. The cushion is still there, but New Balance made the upper lighter and more breathable as well as removed some of the rubber.

New Balance 890v7 Quick Facts:

Heel-to-Toe Drop: 6 mm
Weight: 5.6 oz

New Balance 890v7 Fit

The updated fit of the New Balance 890v7 reminds me of the Fuelcell series. The upper has completely changed from version 6 to 7. The New Balance 890v7 uses one single-layer knit highly breathable fabric and engineered mesh. Since it’s all one seem, the top is more of a bootie-like fit. The engineered knit breathes and moves well with your foot. One thing I can appreciate about New Balance is with their higher cut shoes; they don’t tub or irritate the foot. Other brands have tried a higher cut shoe, but it often digs into the foot.  The padded collar and heel counter doesn’t bother the back of your foot during runs.

New Balance 890v7 Shoe Review

It’s all on one seem and even with the sock like fit, it doesn’t rub bunions. Typically I wear between a women’s size 10-11 wide and the 10.5 fits well.  Even with the engineered knit, the toe box still has plenty of room.

New Balance 890v7 Ride:

A reason I thought I would prefer the New Balance 890v7 for the New York City Marathon, is because it’s more of a speed shoe. The New Balance 880 and New Balance 1080 both have more cushion and are designed for easier runs.

If you have run in a previous model of the New Balance 890v7, you’ll notice version 7 is significantly lighter.  The New Balance 890v7 has a 6 mm drop which helps to feel more responsive.

Like the New Balance 1400v7, New Balance 890v7  uses REVlite midsole foam. The REVlite foam is more firm than the fresh foam but softer than the fuelcell cushioning. Since New Balance is such a large brand, they can use various foams. I appreciate how responsive it is. I’ve done easy runs as well as hard runs and for me, I prefer it for hard or distance runs.

The New Balance 890v7 also has a lot of traction if you’re running in inclement weather. If it’s torrentially raining, I think I would gravitate more towards the New Balance 890v7.

New Balance 890v7 Shoe Review

New Balance 890v7 Conclusion:

The New Balance 890v7 has been completely updated and only shared the name: New Balance 890 with previous versions. I do believe the update is good and it separates it from the New Balance 880. The New Balance 890v7 is designed for speed and fast running. I appreciate the minimal upper and while I don’t think I’ll run my marathon in them,I’ll continue to do hard runs in them afterward.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Bondi 6,  Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport.

Questions for you:

Have you tried the New Balance 8090v9?

Have you had a shoe completely redesigned lately? 

 

The Anatomy of a Running Shoe

The Anatomy of a Running Shoe

The Anatomy of a Running Shoe:

The anatomy of a running shoe is a post I’ve wanted to write for a while.

The anatomy of a running shoe

Since I write a shoe review most weeks, it occurred to me that many people didn’t realize what the actual parts that made up a running shoe are. No shame in that; your only job is to make sure the shoe feels good when you wear it.  It is easier to describe what you like or don’t like in a shoe if you know a few basic terms.

Pictured is the New Balance 1500 (a racing flat ideal for 5ks to marathons)

Anatomy of a running shoe

The “Upper”: 

The upper part of a shoe is exactly what it sounds like: the top of the shoe.  These days, most brands use an upper made of lightweight, breathable, engineered mesh. Although some uppers are made from leather or suede too. Some shoes are even waterproof and the upper can keep water out while still keeping it breathable.

Now, most uppers are seamless, so it doesn’t rub against a wider forefront or bunion. The upper and the shoelaces help secure the foot.  The upper protects your feet and is also what helps keep dirt, rocks or debris out of a shoe.

The anatomy of a running shoe

Toe Box:

The toe box of a running shoe is generally the widest part of the shoe and where your feet and toes are located. You always want movement in the toebox and don’t want your feet to feel squished.

You should be able to wiggle your toes before and after a run comfortably. There should also be about the width of your thumbs length from your longest toe (even if your longest toe is your second or third toe). Having the extra space helps reduce the loss of toenails and keeps your feet from going numb.

Also Included in the Upper Anatomy of a Running Shoe:

Shoe Laces: Shoelaces or Velcro are what hold the top of your foot securely into place. This portion of the shoe is one of the most important for fit in the anatomy of a running shoe.

Tongue: Many people don’t realize the tongue has a purpose! It protects the top of your foot from the pressure of shoelaces but also prevents debris from getting inside.

Heel counter: The heel counter is the firm cup in the back of your shoe to secure your heel. The heel counter makes sure your foot doesn’t slide around. It’s essential always to untie your shoes so you don’t damage the heel counter. Damaging it will bend the plastic and can cause Achilles tendon issues.

Midsole:

The midsole of a running shoe is located between the outsole and the upper. The upper is attached to the midsole of the shoe. Currently, the majority of midsoles are made of a foam called EVA (called ethyl vinyl acetate). Each brand uses different cushioning or EVA that they deem “the best.”

Outsole:

The outsole is a critical component of running shoes, especially when running in inclement weather. The outside is what provides traction on the roads. In trail shoes, the outsole is often thicker to offer more traction. Each brand has different traction in grooves to protect the feet.

Most road shoes are made from blown rubber, which is softer and more flexible. A trail shoe is usually more rigid and is often made of carbon rubber to keep it stiff.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Medial Post:

Not every shoe has a medial post or stability piece to it. Many do, but not all. Most running shoes fall into one of the following combinations: motion control, neutral shoes, or stability shoes. Motion control shoes are designed with the most support, where neutral have zero support. (They can have cushion, but keep in mind support does equal cushion).Stability helps keep a collapsed arch propped in or someone who pronates back into neutral.

The medial post is one of the most important components to determining if a shoe will work for you. If you need a lot of stability and the shoe is neutral, chances are it won’t work. Not everyone needs medial support and using a shoe that has support when you don’t need it can lead to other issues. Most stability components of a shoe are made out of a dual-density combination of TPU (thermoplastic urethane) and EVA.

Not all stability pieces are the same. Some shoes provide minor stability where some is much more corrective. Each brand and each shoe within a brand are different.

The Shank:

Many people don’t even realize a running shoe “shank” exists. The shank is what controls the flexion and torsion of a shoe. It helps the bend naturally and helps with a smooth transition from heel to toe.  The stiffer the shank, the less the shoe will flex.

Heel Drop:

One of the most common questions in the running world, is what a shoe heel to toe drop? I wrote a newsletter on it a few months ago. In short, the heel to toe drop is the height of the heel minus the height of the forefront (in millimeters). For example, a zero drop shoe (like the brand Altra) has the same height and cushion in the heel as the forefront. Most traditional shoes have between 10-12 mm.

Thicker heels will usually cause your heel to drop and hit the ground first, whereas a thinner heel will be easier to run more on your forefront. There is no right or wrong heel drop in the anatomy of a running shoe but it takes trial and error to figure out what works best for you.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Last:

When it comes to last, not every brand is the same. The last of the shoe is essentially the shape of the shoe. Most running shoe lasts curved, but shoe lasts can be curved, semi-curved, or straight. If you flip over and look at your Brooks shoe, you can see it curves in the front, pinches in the middle, and curves out in the back. Most traditional running shoes are semi-curved. Finding a last that matches the shape of your foot is just as important as finding a shoe that matches your needs structurally. In the anatomy of a running shoe, the last is what will help find the correct fit.

Anatomy of a running shoe

Why is the Anatomy of a Running Shoe Important for Runners?

Knowing the anatomy of a running shoe because you can find the shoe that works for you both structural and by shape. At the end of the day, you want to find the shoe you are most comfortable in.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport.

Questions for you:

What is your favorite shoe? Why? 

Were you familiar with the anatomy of a running shoe?

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

The New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review:

The New Balance 1400 is a consistent and established racing flat for many runners. There is enough cushion to race a marathon, but it’s also light enough to race a hard mile. In my quest to find a marathon racing shoe for the New York City Marathon, I tried the New Balance 1400v6. Ultimately, I think the New Balance Fuelcell Rebel will be my marathon choice, but I like the ride of the NB 1400 too.

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

New Balance 1400v6 Quick Facts:

Heel to Toe Drop: 10 mm

Weight: 7.2 oz

New Balance 1400v6 Fit:

For the most part, the updates of the New Balance 1400 updates are in the upper and the fit. Like many brands and shoes, the New Balance 1400v6 now has an engineered mesh upper with no seams. The breathable mesh package helps to fit more feet (especially if your forefront is wider), but also, the New Balance 1400v6 is about an ounce lighter and a more airy feel.

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

A brand new update to the upper of the New Balance 1400v6 is also the internal “FantomFit support cage.”  What is that? The FantomFit support cage is designed to hold the foot securely in place. I did run in the previous version of the New Balance 1400, and I find the NB 1400v6 to hug my feet more and slip less.

Lastly, New Balance did update the tongue of the NB 1400.  A common complaint to the New Balance 1400 series is the paper-thin tongue. Many people struggled with it causing irritation or cutting the top of the foot. It’s been updated to lay flat on the foot.

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

New Balance 1400v6 Ride:

The NB 1400v6 has minimal changes with the ride in the 6th version. The New Balance 1400v6 continues to the New Balance foam “revlite.” What is a Revlite midsole? The Revlite midsole is a durable, lightweight foam and smooth. Since New Balance is such a large company, they have many different foams, including “fresh foam,” “Revlite,” and “Fuelcell.” I appreciate how firm the New Balance 1400v6 is and that it responds well when racing hard.

Like the previous versions of the New Balance 1400, there is a plastic shank from the midfoot to the forefoot. The shank acts as a spring, which helps for a smooth transition from midfoot to the forefront.

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

One thing that is unique about the NB 1400 series is the stack height. The stack height of the New Balance 1400v6 is 25 mm in the heel and 15 mm in the forefront. The 10mm drop is almost unheard of in a racing flat. (Most racing lats are anywhere between 0-4 mm). It seems to work well, especially if you are using more traditional running shoes for the bulk of your training.

One thing I can appreciate with the New Balance 1400 v6, is the amount of blown rubber and traction in the NB 1400. It consistently performs well in the rain. If New York is rainy, the New Balance 1400 will most likely be my shoe of choice. There is plenty of traction and I won’t worry about sliding down the course on race day.

New Balance 1400v6 Shoe Review

New Balance 1400v6 Conclusion:

The New Balance 1400 is a classic shoe and it’s an excellent option for 5ks to marathons. The NB 1400 is a staple racing flat that I believe will be around in the running industry for a long time. There aren’t many speed workouts this shoe can’t handle. For me, it’s the best choice in a rainy race or marathon.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Bondi 6,  Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: New Balance Fuelcell 5280Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport.

Questions for you:

Have you run in the New Balance 1400v6?

What is your go-to race day shoe? 

Nike ZoomX Vaporfly Next%

Truthfully, I think it’s dumb to post a review about the Nike ZoomX Vaporfly Next% (or just Nike Vaporfly Next%). Before reading anything, you’ve already made up your mind if you are going to buy the Nike Vaporfly Next%. Most brands are coming up with some form of carbon fiber plate shoe, Nike just did so first. There is plenty of research to shoe the Nike Vaporfly Next% does make you run faster, but you also have to put in the work.

It’s no secret there have been plenty of world records run and races like the London Marathon won and Eliud Kipchoge has run the fastest marathon time. The Next Vaporfly Next% is a race day shoe. I would do some training in the running shoes, but save most of the shoe for racing. That way you get the most out of your money because the Nike Vaporfly Next% is not durable.

Anyway, since Nike ZoomX Vaporfly Next% is a lot to type out, I’ll just say the Nike Next%. You get it.  I do believe the second version of the Nike Vaporfly has gotten a good update, and I wouldn’t be as worried about sliding down the streets on a poor weather day.

Nike Vaporfly Next% Fit:

Like the Nike Zoom Fly 3, the Nike Next% now uses Vaporweave. According to Nike, the Vaporweave absorbs 93% less water. This isn’t limited to rain but also includes sweat. A common complaint was the flyknit upper absorbed the moisture and made your feet feel sloppy (which is true).

The Vaporweave upper material is transparent and also lighter than the Flyknit and mixes two plastics: TPU and TPE.  So be sure to wear cool socks, because you’ll see them.

Outside of the Vaporweave material, the toe box is wider. The Nike Next% isn’t made in wides, but it does fit wider. The laces are now asymmetrical to remove the pressure that some had on the top of their foot.

Nike Next% fits true to size. I wear a women’s size 10-11 wide and I found the unisex 9 to be sufficient.

Nike Vaporfly Next% Ride:

The Nike, Next% ride, is where all of the magic happens. That’s why people (myself included) are willing to spend the $250. Much of the shoe’s performance benefit comes from Nike’s ZoomX foam.

For Nike Next%, the Nike team added more ZoomX.  By adding an additional 4 mm of stack height, they added 1 mm of ZoomX foam. Why does this matter? The ride is significantly different than previous versions. The heel to toe drop of the Nike Next% is now 8 mm when previously it was 11 mm. (Your calves might be sorer).

Finally, the most important feature Nike added to the Next% was the rubberized bottom. Now if you run in a torrential downpour (like say Boston), you won’t slide around. Plus instead of the Nike Next% lasting 50 miles, it will last about 100.

Nike Vaporfly Next% Conclusion:

The Nike Next% is a faster shoe than the previous Nike Vaporfly. I’m surprised; it didn’t jump in cost because of more expensive materials to use in the product.  If you are willing to spend $250 to shave a minute or two off your race, then it’s worth it. Other brands are coming out with a similar carbon plated shoe soon too.

With the exception of NYCM last year, none of my PRs are from the Next % series. Last year at NYCM was the first marathon I ran in over 3 years so I don’t attribute PRing with the shoes. I personally have mixed feelings about the shoe. I think there are better shoes for shorter distances, but I do think they are a good marathon shoe (because I didn’t injure myself during last year’s marathon).

 

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Bondi 6,  Brooks Ghost 12

Speed Work: New Balance FuelCell RebelReebok Float Ride Run fast ProHoka RinconNike Pegasus Turbo 2

Long Runs: New Balance FuelCell RebelMizuno R2Hoka Cavu 2

Races: Nike Next%,  Reebok Run fast Pro, 

You Can See All Current Shoe Reviews Here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. 

Questions for you:

Have you bought a pair of Nike Nike%?

Do you love them? 

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