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Training: Easy Runs and Windy 10ks

Training: Easy Runs and Windy 10ks

Last week was a blur.  I actually had a hard time remembering what I even ran last week!  Some weeks I’m on top of writing a training log, other weeks I’m not.  Thank goodness for looking back at Instagram I guess.

me running

Monday: 60 minutes easy
Tuesday: 8-mile hike at Hartshorne Park
Wednesday: 60 minutes easy
Thursday: Rest
Friday: 60 minutes easy
Saturday: Cape May 10k (41:07)
Sunday: 13 mile easy run

All of my easy runs were just that, easy.  To be honest, I felt good in the beginning of the week and then by Friday I felt like Broad Street hit me!  There wasn’t enough time to do any workouts between Broad Street and the Cape May 10k, so I didn’t.

Cape May 10k: 41:07

I’ll have a full recap of the race, but it wasn’t my day.  My legs were tired, it was windy, and to add to my list of issues, I accidentally ran in old trainers.  Around mile 5, my feet started burning.  Not in a broken bone way, but in a “something is weird way”.  After the race, I realized I never changed into my racing shoes and was wearing old trainers.  These were trainers I retired from running altogether but decided they could still be ok for walking around.  No wonder my feet hurt, I was basically running a 10k on concrete.

I ran the April Fools half marathon 10k split as well as Broad Street in low 38, so racing a 10k in 41 isn’t a great time for me right now.  A 41 minute 10k is fantastic for many people, but it’s not awesome for me right now. Not a big deal, and I still had a lot of fun down the shore.  Do bad races stink? Of course, we all do but I’m already over it.

On Sunday, I had planned to run about 10 but literally ran into a few friends during my run.  I ended up running about 5 miles with them, which caused me to be out longer than I anticipated.  I’m glad I decided to run with my friends, and I can’t remember the last time I ran 13 miles straight through at a relaxed, comfortable pace.  It was nice to change it up.

Thoughts from the Week:

In all, I had a good week. The 10k didn’t go as I had hoped (My “C” goal was to break 40), but running is funny like that.  You’ll never feel good at every race.  If you do, you are probably going to test positive for something…

My plan for the remainder of May is just to have fun.  I have a lot going on the next few weeks, and I’ll still run, but I’m not going crazy.  My races might slower than the Spring, but it’s okay.

Posts from the Week:

Broad Street 10 Miler (1:02.51)

Exploring Cattus Island Park in Toms River

Recovering with Collagen Protein

Questions for you:

Do you have any 10k wisdom?

How was your week of training?

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Training Recap: Warm Weather and 10 Milers

Training Recap: Warm Weather and 10 Milers

Last weeks of training went well.  My goal was to run Broad Street, something I didn’t do last year.  I knew I wasn’t in the same shape as when I PRed at the Phoenix half and honestly that is okay.

Monday: 6-mile hike at Cattus Island Park
Tuesday: Easy 60 minutes run
Wednesday: 12X400s 400 recovery average 87 seconds
Thursday: Easy 60 minutes run
Friday: Rest
Saturday: Easy 60 minutes
Sunday: Broad Street 10 miler 1:02.51

 

Wednesday: 12x400s average 87 seconds

My workout went well.  I do all of my workouts on the road right now because of the limited Availablity of local tracks.  I ran 400 and jogged 400.  I felt good during the entire workout and was pleasantly surprised with how fast I was able to run.

Broad Street 10 miler (1:02.51)

I’ve run faster Broad Streets and I’ve run slower.  I kept a very even pace the entire time.  All of my miles were between 6:10-6:19.  I smiled, I side fived kids, and truly enjoyed myself.  That was not something I could do last year and I’m proud of how I ran the race.  I’ll have a full recap later in the week.  Both my dad and father in law had great races as well and it’s been great having my entire family here.

Other then that, it was a good week.  While I’m not in the same shape as I was when I ran the Phoenix half marathon, I am in good shape.  I’m looking forward to just running shorter races from 5ks to 10 miles until the fall.

Posts of the Week:

April Training

Broad Street Last Minute Tips (I guess too late now LOL?)

Making Strides 5k (19:08)

Questions for you:

Have you ever run a 10-mile race?

What is your ideal running temperature?

April Training: Snow to 90

April Training: Snow to 90

It’s hard to believe another month has gone by.  April wasn’t my best, or even second best month of the year, but it was a lot better than last April.

I had two goals for April and I met both of them:

  1. Finish the April Fools Half (mentally) healthy
  2. Not Burn out in April like 2017

So while I didn’t log any extremely fast times or workouts, I also didn’t burn out and that is far ahead of where I was last year.

me april fools half marathon atlantic city running

Miles Run: Around 200
Rest Days: 6
Range of Paces: 5:49-10:32-untimed
Workouts: 7
Races:
April Fools Half (1:26.08)
Making Strides 5k (19:08)

Thoughts:

As I mentioned, nothing was exceptionally fast and I’m okay with that!  I’m running healthy and that is what matters.  As most people know, I took a nasty fall during the April Fools Half (I collided with a spectator cutting across the course).  I got an X-ray to confirm I didn’t break anything but it took about 2 weeks to feel good again.  It actually hurt the most while sitting.  Luckily by the end of the month, I felt much better.

It’s funny to look back at photos and realize there was a lot going on, weather wise.  In the beginning of the month we had snow and we ended with 90 degrees!

It’s fine, it will melt this weekend.

A post shared by Hollie (@fueledbylolz) on

In May, I’ll be traveling a lot.  It’s going to be a busy but fun month.  My goal for the summer months is just enjoying running.  This summer, I would like to get to local tracks more since students won’t be in school.  After Broad Street on Sunday, I don’t have any big goal races of the summer.

Posts from the Month:

Running:

Last Minute Broad Street Tips
Benefits of Massages for Runners
ON Cloud Shoe Review
Rest Weeks Save Training Cycles

Hiking:

Exploring Turkey Swamp Park
What I Pack in My Hiking Bag

Blogging:

Blogging is Dying

Blossom like a Cherry Blossom.

A post shared by Hollie (@fueledbylolz) on

Questions for you: How was your month of training?  What are your plans this summer?

Last Minute Broad Street Run Tips

Last Minute Broad Street Run Tips

The Broad Street Run in Philadelphia is one of my favorite races.  I’ve run in 2014, 2015, and 2016.  Last year, I was burned out and spectated, but I do plan to run again this year.  Spectating always brings a new perspective to a race, so it was fun to join my mother in law, as well as thousands cheering along the way.  The 10-mile race itself is enormous.  Thinking out loud, 40,000+ people packed into 10 miles is a lot different than 50,000 packed into 26.2 like the NYCM.

Many locals asked if I could put together a few tips about racing.

Last Minute Broad Street Run Tips

Tips for the Philadelphia Broad Street Run:

Get to the Race Early:

This could be a tip for any race.  Of course, you don’t want to miss your goal race!   The race begins at 8 a.m. for the red coral.  The corrals go off about 5-10 minutes apart, so most people don’t leave right at 8 am.

The transportation situation is honestly one of the most nerve-wracking parts of the entire race.  If you are traveling to the start alone, it’s easiest to park at the Citizens bank stadium lots and either take the Septa line or one of the bases.  There are PLENTY of subways to get all racers to the starting line.  Parking is not a big deal because of all the lots, but I cannot stress how important it is to get there early.

Subway trains begin running at 5:30 a.m. They will even run direct express trains.  If you are coming from Center City board the Walnut/Locust stop.

When I mentioned early, it is best to board a train around 6:00 a.m.  It does take about 35 minutes for trains to reach the start with stops, and there will be lines for rest rooms once you are there,

Don’t Forget Race Day Essentials.

I feel like this is always good advice but don’t forget everything you need.  If doing a flat lay on Instagram helps you remember, then, by all means, do it.  I think I need to go that route because I always forget something to local races.

Bring a Throwaway Top:

This year the weather is looking good, and maybe rainy, but it does get cold if you are waiting around in line.  In 2016, it was 40 degrees and pouring rain, and it was awful to wait around!  All discarded clothing is donated so you won’t feel bad.  With the current weather predicted, light rain and 50s I’ll wear a light jacket to at least throw away.

Unless you are in the Red corral or an Elite, you Don’t Start directly at 8 am:

Broad Street divides runners into corrals based on speed. The time between each corral is about 5-10 minutes so plan accordingly. Even though you may not start at 8 am, the roads are closed, and it becomes increasingly difficult to get to the start the later it gets.

If you have spectators watching, know Where They Are:

On a beautiful day, thousands of people spectate. It can be difficult to find your family or friends if they tell you somewhere around mile 7 or 8 (or wherever).

Stay hydrated

With 40,000 people running the water stations get crowded, and most people stop to walk.  Pay attention and don’t fall (believe me a tailbone injury is not fun). Around the water, stations are slippery and sticky from hydration, Gatorade, and GU.

Plan your water breaks, and you can find a list of stops here.

Don’t Stop at the Navy Yard:

Many people think the gates at the Navy yard is the finish.  It’s not, and you have about a quarter of a mile to go.  The quarter of a mile feels like forever but you’re almost done.  If you are a spectator, refrain from saying “almost done”.

Pick a Meeting Spot at the Navy Yard:

Last year, we spent nearly 90 minutes trying to meet up with my father in law.  The end can be a “dead zone” for cell service so find a spot to meet people.  Make sure you have established this beforehand.  There is a map of the finish line area here.

After the Race, you Will Walk:

You don’t finish right at your car and typically, I’ve had to walk between 1-2 miles to get back.  No big deal, but be prepared.  I remember after finishing the NYCM several years ago, my body could not handle walking the amount afterwards.  In 2016, you were walking around the Navy Yard in the pouring rain.

Finally, of Course, Have Fun:

It’s running!  Unless you are competing for prize money and racing Broad Street is your job, make sure to have fun.  At the end of the day, it’s one of the most iconic races and the most iconic in Philadelphia.

Questions for you:

Have you ever run Broad Street?

What is the biggest race you’ve run?

Making Strides 5k (19:08)

Making Strides 5k (19:08)

Last weekend I decided to hop into a local race down in Pine Hill, NJ.  The race benefited program planning for Ovarian Cancer awareness, which is near and dear to my heart.

I knew it would be smart to get some faster miles on my legs before racing the Broad Street Run this weekend.  While my tailbone hasn’t bothered me while running over the last few days, I hadn’t raced anything, and I didn’t want to jump into a 10-mile race, not knowing what to expect.

I arrived at the race around 8 am, signed up, and warmed up.  I walked over to the starting line on the local track.  I’ve never started a 5k on a track.  I finished several races on a track and races that ended on a track, but this race did a loop around the track and left.

At 9 am we were off.  The lap around the track was interesting.  The walk started directly after, so we had walkers to cheer us on.  I high fived a little kid as I completed my first loop.  We ran onto the field, and the headed towards the road.  During the first half mile, I found myself in second place overall.  I stayed there the entire time and ran the entire race by myself.  The first mile incorporated track, grass, dirt, and road.  It felt like it took forever.  Realistically it was my fastest mile in the last month, and I hit mile 1 in 5:49.  To be honest, I was shocked!

As I went into mile 2, I realized I probably took the race out too fast.  I wasn’t tapered, and the week prior had been not glamorous.  The second mile looped around a baseball field and headed towards a neighborhood.  I thought I was going the wrong way, but luckily the volunteer pointed in the right way.  My legs began to feel sore, but I was able to hold a 6:08 mile.

making strides 5k pine hill nj

During the last mile, I was hurting.  My tailbone felt fine, but my legs did not feel good.  I was running alone, and I knew I had paid the price of taking the race out too quickly.  I’ve learned that lesson before, but it’s never fun in a 5k. I just focused on finishing the race.  We ran back around the field, and entered the track around 2.9 miles and ran a final loop around the track.

I ran the last mile in 6:13 and finished in 19:08.  Do I think the course was a little long?  Probably, but I’m happy with the result and even happier my tailbone felt good. The mix of terrain made it a more challenging, but fun course.

I ran a similar time at the Phillies 5k last month, which was windy but still challenging.  I haven’t run any fast 5ks lately due to weather, terrain, or life.  I feel good about the race and that my tailbone has finally turned a corner.

Questions for you:

Have you ever run on the track?

Would you prefer to run on trails or pavement?

Training: Small Issues along the Way

Training: Small Issues along the Way

Last week was the week from hell. I’ve had a lot going on, but on a personal level all of these things happened over the previous two weeks:

  • I’ve fallen on my tailbone and bruised it which takes up to four weeks to heal
  • I’ve had two corneal abrasions
  • I cut my finger open cutting beets and nearly had to go to the ER
  • I had a migraine bad enough I had aura and also puked

By themselves, none of these are “all that bad” but having them happen over the course of two weeks have been…something.  Luckily, this weekend I was able to take time for myself, and that seemed to help.

Monday: Easy 60 minute run
Tuesday: 5 mile walk around Turkey Swamp Park
Wednesday: 4X1 miles at 6:15 pace
Thursday: Rest
Friday: 60-minute run
Saturday: Making Strides 5k (19:08)
Sunday: 12 Mile Long Run fast finish

Thoughts:

My easy runs were just that, easy.  I don’t care about pace, and it’s not a race.

Wednesday: 4X1 mile average 6:15 with 90 seconds rest

I didn’t feel great during my workout but not awful either. I’ve been trying to get back to being consistent which is easier said than done.  I’ve been doing my workouts on roads which I like better because I typically race on roads.

Saturday: Making Strides 5k (19:08) 5:49, 6:08, 6:13

The goal of the race was to see how my tailbone would handle a race environment and in flats.  With Broad Street next weekend, I didn’t want to jump in a 10-mile race, only to realize by a quarter of a mile my tailbone wasn’t happy.  It hasn’t hurt during workouts, but that isn’t the race setting.

I’m happy to report my tailbone didn’t bother me at all during the race and has progressively gotten better in the last 48 hours (the first two weeks, it felt achy all of the time and the most when I sat).  I don’t want to jinx myself though!

The race itself was a mix of cross country grass, road, and even track.  I’ll have a full recap this week, but I ran most of the race alone.  While the time itself is not “fast” right now for me, I am proud of it for the terrain.  I got everything I wanted out of the race.

Sunday Long Run:

Over the past few months, I’ve been doing faster finish runs.  On Sunday, I attempted to my longest run since the April Fools Half.  It went well and my last half averaged around 7:03 pace.  My tailbone felt normal and it gave me confidence that I’ll be able to run Broad Street next weekend.

Posts of the Week:

Exploring Turkey Swamp Park

Blogging is Dying 

Questions for you:

Have you ever had “one of those weeks”?

Do you prefer road races, track, or trail?

Blogging is Dying.

Blogging is Dying.

Blogging is Dying.

There I said it.

I’ve actually had a document on my computer titled: “blogging is dying” for a couple of months now.  Past that, I haven’t continued the post.  Maybe I was waiting for the best moment to post it, maybe not.  Either way, blogging is slowly dying.

I’ve contemplated writing this post for a while now, but I don’t know where to begin.  It’s probably a mismatched bunch of words that don’t flow together but when is that anything new?

So here we go:

I started blogging in 2010 when blogging was beginning to grow.  Everyone was blogging!

It was the new thing to do instead of writing a Facebook update that was 10 pages long.  I think in 2010, I followed close to 20 blogs.  I was captivated by their writing, and it ranged from runners, to triathletes, to even a chocolate blog (you know).

I followed people with similar interests.  Most people were posting at least a few times a week, if not more.  To be honest, I think most blogs posted daily, which I did too!

2012-2014, continued the trend and blogging continued to grow.  As the years went by, new social media was created.

There were so many new platforms:

Instagram: To take photos of everything you did!

Twitter: To write short burbs and updates about life!

Facebook pages: When one facebook isn’t enough, get two!

Pinterest and more (to save blogs, recipes, and whatever else you’ll read or follow up on!

I remember kicking my feet at getting twitter…ugh another thing, I couldn’t keep up.  I ultimately got most of them, except for Pinterest, because I just pin cat memes.

Then 2013 was a big year for me.  I moved four times: New York to Virginia to Texas to New Jersey.  I ran my first marathon, and moved in with a boyfriend at the time who put a ring on it (yes Tim).  It was the year where I had no idea what I wanted to do.  I lived off of savings, made some money blogging, and just job searched like any early 20 year old.

In 2014, life settled down a little bit (not much, but enough).  My husband and I got engaged, settled in NJ, and I finally set a half marathon PR.  2014 for blogging was probably my “biggest year”.

What does biggest in blogging even mean?

Most page views?  Most engagement?  Most money made?

All three!

blog stats

Then in 2014, a lot of things on the internet changed.  Social media channels began to grow, and many runners turned to Instagram to document and give running advice.  I tried to go that route with long blog post captions but quickly realized I liked Instagram for taking photos of pretty places.  It isn’t my personal preference to write a novel caption about how inspired I was to get out there.

I run and come home.  I don’t have an inspiring story about every run, I just get out there and do it.  I’m just a woman in the Garden State trying to make it look cool. I don’t like to post half-naked photos and don’t like to give advice about running.  I don’t want my account to be running only and don’t want to create a separate Instagram account for my personal life either.

My Instagram is my life whether I have a blog or not.  It isn’t limited to running, because my life isn’t limited to running.  Maybe I’ll never have a niche, but that is fine.  My blog talks more about my training and life, while Instagram is just photos and short captions.  A couple of weeks ago, my husband I celebrated our anniversary. Not running, but part of my life.

Celebrating our 3 year anniversary.

A post shared by Hollie (@fueledbylolz) on

Anyway, with the growth of Instagram and other social media, came the slow fall of blogging.

It isn’t just blogging that has fallen, and many running publications have ceased too.  For instance, Competitor magazine only exists online.  Runners World was acquired by Hearst.

This post isn’t too bash anything or anyone.  It’s just to briefly explain what I’ve observed in the last several years.  It’s not the only view, and for some their blog has gotten bigger, which is great!

In summary, social media such as Instagram has grown.  People would prefer free advice versus paying, and to be honest, people don’t want or have the time and interest to read blogs anymore.

So How do You Support Blogs?

The easiest way to support any blogger or let them know you’re reading is occasionally comment (and no I’m not begging for comments).  Commenting or sharing posts/articles are two big ways to support bloggers without doing much.

Many people have told me in person, “love your blog” and to be honest I’m shocked they read.  Sure, right now I average about 500 page views a day, but I rarely get more than 1-2 comments per post, so I have no clue who reads, if anyone!  No one is a mind reader.  I don’t expect anyone to read, but it’s always nice to hear from people who are.

I will still blog because I like too.  I’ve stopped blogging every day, but I’ll continue to blog.  This post is not meant to be negative, or put anyone down.  It’s just the trend i’ve noticed throughout several years of blogging (which of course different people notice different things).

Questions for you:

How long have you been blogging? Is blogging dying? Discuss?

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