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Training Log: Because I’m Training for Something!

Training Log: Because I’m Training for Something!

If you follow me on Instagram, then you might know I was selected to run the Big Cottonwood Marathon (Yes, MARATHON). A week ago, training for a marathon wasn’t my plan for the summer. I wanted to get speed and get back into shape, but I didn’t have any huge goals in mind. I applied for the Team Hylands Big Cottonwood Team because it sounded like an awesome experience. I never thought I would be selected.

Big Cottonwood is the exact opposite marathon experience of what I’ve been used too. I’ve run NYCM twice, and it’s crowded and hilly. Both of my better marathon times have come from NYCM (3:17, 3:07) despite it being one of the toughest courses out there. The second marathon I ran, Phoenix, was downhill enough that it doesn’t count towards an OTQ but you can still Boston Qualify. I ran a 3:14 there, and at the time was a PR. It wasn’t close to the 3:10 I wanted and my quads were on fire from the downhill.

Am I entirely sure I will excel at a new downhill course? I don’t know, but I am excited to have a big race on the books.

I’m not in the same shape as last spring, summer, or fall, so my goal is to get back into shape. I would be ecstatic to run about the same time as NYCM, knowing it wouldn’t translate into the same fitness as a 3:07 at NYCM. I’m most excited to train for something.  I’ll have a post about it at some point, but I’m going to wait a couple more weeks to start “training.”  I want a shorter training cycle with 2-3 20 miles. I don’t want to focus much on doing anything past 20 miles because in the humid summer, that is unpleasant. I would rather take shorter quality miles, than longer, slogging through the humidity miles.

That was a long intro to my training log, right?

Monday: Easy 60 minutes/3000 meter swim
Tuesday: Rest
Wednesday: 12X400 averaging 6:20 pace
Thursday: 3000-meter swim
Friday: Easy 60 minutes
Saturday: Movie Madness Half Marathon (14 Mile at 7:10 pace)
Sunday: Easy 60 minutes/3000 meter swim

 

Thoughts:

Besides marathon training, I guess. As always, my easy runs are just that, easy.

Workout Wednesday: 12X400 averaging 6:20 pace with 90 seconds recovery

I do my workouts on roads. I like it better, and most tracks aren’t open except very early or very late. So I do them all on roads. When school is done for the summer, I might get on the track.  The workout was a little faster than last week, which is progress.

Swimming:

I still plan to swim throughout the summer. I’m enjoying the cross training, and even though I’m marathon training soon, I think the extra cross training is going to keep me healthy.

Movie Madness Half Marathon: 14 Miles (7:10 average):

After my weekend plans changed, I decided to skip town and run the Movie Madness Half Marathon in Harrisburg. You can’t beat a $60 half marathon these days. The short story is, I was misdirected around mile 3 and ended up running 14 miles instead of 13.1 While yes, it stinks to get lost and run longer, my goal for the race was to get quality miles in. I wasn’t in a “race mode,” and I didn’t go to the half marathon to run my “fastest” ever.  It was fun to get a long run done elsewhere and enjoy myself.

Anyway, that was my most exciting training log for a while, because I’m going to start training for something.

Posts from the Week:

Exploring Tyler State Park (Newtown, PA)

Reebok Floatride Run Fast

Cape May 10k (42:35)

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. This week I talked about why running shoes are so expensive.  Each week in the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. There are often giveaways as well as discount codes.

Questions for you:

Have you run the Big Cottonwood Marathon? Have you run a downhill marathon? Any tips? 

Are you training for something this summer?

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Reebok Floatride Run Fast

Reebok Floatride Run Fast

Like I mentioned with the Reebok Floatride Run fast Pro, if you had asked me if I would be running in Reebok a year ago I would have laughed. Now I run in two shoes from Reebok.  Plus, the Runfast Pro rivals the Nike 4% and in my opinion, a better shoe when it rains.  Recently, Reebok stepped up their game and reentered the running industry.

Reebok Floatride Run Fast shoe review

Floatride Run Fast ( $140)
Weight: 6.05 oz
Stack Height:8mm drop.

Fit:

It fits more similar to a racing flat than a true trainer. It runs narrow, and the top is pointy. If you have a wider foot, it’s better to go up a half size. I found the 10.5 to be a good fit, but I think it was running longer I might go higher than that.

The upper uses a very thin engineered mesh. I can appreciate how the mesh is seamless. If you have a bunion or wider forefront, it won’t rub. The upper is one of the lightest and most breathable of any shoes I’ve run in.  It’s worth noting that with the lack of seams, there isn’t a lot of structure to the shoe.

Reebok Floatride Run Fast shoe review

Ride:

The Reebok Floatride Run Fast is a shoe that is designed to run fast. It’s not a true racing flat and has more cushion than the Pro, but it’s a great option for speed work and tempos.

Since it has enough cushion, it could be used as a long run or an easy run shoe, but I don’t think I’ll keep it there myself.  If you like running in something flatter or lighter (like the Saucony Kinvara, Hoka Cavu, or New Balance Beacon), you might prefer to train in it.

Reebok has the best traction of any road shoe on the market right now. When it’s raining or wet, I’ve gravitated towards Reebok just because of all of the rubber on the bottom. If I run another rainy race, I’ll probably race in the Run Fast Pro.

Reebok Floatride Run Fast shoe review

Conclusion:

Reebok is definitely back in the running game with their shoes. The Run Fast is a great option for speed work and faster runs. For me, it won’t be an easy run or recovery shoe because I need more cushion.

Current Rotation:

Easy/Daily Runs: Hoka Mach 2, Brooks Glycerin 17

Speed Work: Reebok Float Ride Runfast Pro, Nike Streak Lt,

Long Runs: Hoka Cavu 2

Races: Nike Fly, Reebok Run fast Pro

You can see all current shoe reviews here.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. This week I talked about the differences between social media runners and running specialty.  In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. There are often giveaways as well as discount codes.

Questions for you:

What is your favorite shoe in the rain?

What shoe are you racing in right now? 

 

 

Cape May 10k (42:35)

Cape May 10k (42:35)

The Cape May 10k begins my racing to get back into shape.  It’s been mentally tough to start at one of my slower points in many years, but it is what it is.

After going to a college roommates wedding on Friday in Baltimore, we got home late Friday. Cape May is about 90 minutes from my house, which means between the 2 hours to Baltimore, 2 hours home, then 90 minutes to Cape May, my car got a workout before the race. Did all of this play a role in how I raced the day after, probably.

I like Cape May a lot. It’s a small town and one of the most beautiful in NJ. I take any opportunity to get down there. I got there around 7:20, ran a couple of miles and got to the start around 7:55. After talking with a new friend, Sandy, we were off.Cape May 10k me running

During the first mile, I felt pretty good. I thought: maybe this will be the unicorn day that surprises me with how I feel. I logged a 6:36 mile and was pleased.

The second mile looped around the shore, and we got a little breeze. It was lonely, and I found myself running alone the entire time. It felt like a time trial. I ran a 6:43 and I couldn’t get a groove or find a new, faster gear.

Between the 2nd and 3rd mile, the 5ks headed toward the finish line and truthfully I was jealous. I was over the race already. I hit the third mile in 6:48.

Cape May 10k me running

I tried everything to get back into a better headspace — just three more miles. Already halfway done. I couldn’t get back there. I didn’t give up, but my legs felt like they hit a wall. I ran the 4th mile in 6:59.  I was running alone and it just felt like I couldn’t find a faster groove.

The next two miles were just focused on the finish line. I got to run with my good friend Skip, who I run with regularly back home and training. We tried to keep each other motivated.

Cape May 10k me running

I hit mile 5 in 7:01 and just kept going. We ran up on the boardwalk, and I nearly slipped and fell on the sand. At 5.5, you can see the finish line, and it does not feel like it’s getting closer. I weaved around a few 5kers and crossed in 42:35.

Thoughts:

I would be lying if I was particularly pleased with a 42:35 10k, but it gives me room to improve. The next day, I ran 12 miles and ran my last 3 miles at 7:08, 7:01, 6:56 and felt better than the 10k. I’m actually racing several 10ks this summer. I plan to keep racing and hopefully race my way back into shape.

Also thank you to my good friend, Lindsay, for the photos.

Questions for you:

Have you run a 10k?

What’s your favorite town in your state?

Aftershokz Headphone Review

Aftershokz Headphone Review

Many people have asked to start including product reviews as well as shoe reviews on my blog. Contrary to popular belief, I don’t change shoes every single week so a new shoe review won’t happen.

I’ve reviewed a few other running brand gear including CEP Compression as well as the Coros GPS Watch.

Aftershokz Headphone review

Do you run with music?

This is a question I get frequently. During easy runs, I do. During workouts and races, I don’t. I don’t typically listen to podcasts when I run and usually keep podcasts on in the background when I’m working or cleaning my house (hey, we all need motivation right?).

I should preface this review with: for years, I used the standard iPhone headphones and didn’t have an issue. I could buy dollar store headphones, and they would work.

The primary issue, for me, was safety and hearing things around me. With standards headphones, I always kept the music low to hear around me.

What makes Aftershokz different?

By now, you’ve heard of Aftershokz on the internet. We sell them at the running store I work at as well, the brand has gotten big!

Aftershokz sits in front of your ear so you can still hear around you. Aftershokz sends sound waves through your cheekbones, leaving your ears open so you can hear what is going on around you. I’ve run countless miles with them, and I can hear everything while also listening to music.

Most headphone companies want to promote noise isolation and cancellation, AfterShokz has gone against the grain with the open ear design. Not having something covering your ears allows you to be more alert and have situational awareness during your workout.

The Pros:

  • The only headphone design that allows you to hear your surroundings.
  • Durable (they are sweatproof and I’ve run in the rain several times and been fine).
  • Light: They aren’t bulky and don’t bounce around.
  • Bluetooth and no cord

The Cons:

  • They aren’t going to be as loud as other headphone brands that sit directly on your ear.  They don’t cancel outside noise, but that is the point.

ETA: Originally, I stated that you can’t change music/volume directly on the headphone. You, in fact, can and it’s done with the button on the side!  How I missed that, I don’t know!

Bone Conduction? What does that mean?

As you play music or sound, the pads vibrate. Instead of sending noise through the air and into your eardrum, it diverts it through your bones.

With bone conduction, there is a difference in the sound between over the ear headphones. I’ve always found the volume to be fine with the Aftershokz and bone conduction. I don’t know if they are the right headphone for a more noisy situation like crowded gym but for running, they are great.

The Models:

The Trekz Titanium:

Aftershokz Headphone review

The Trekz Titanium was the original version and retails at $99.99. It’s the first, the original, and a great product.  It comes in brighter and more bold colors. If bright colored headphones are for you, this is your product.

  • The Aftershokz Titanium has Bone conduction technology delivers music through your cheekbones, ensuring ears remain completely open to hear outside sounds.
  • Light, flexible and portable.
  • The OpenFit™ design allows you to hear outside noise while still enjoying music.
  • Wireless Bluetooth
  • It’s certified to keep out sweat, dust, and moisture, from workouts to wicked weather
  • Six hours of sound per full charge
  • Hassle-free 2-year warranty

The Aftershokz Trekz Air: 

Aftershokz Headphone review

The Trekz Air is the second generation and retails at $149.99. It all has all of the features of the Titanium but with a few more.  The colors are much more toned down as well. The Trekz Air has a little better sound quality and volume. The significant updates come with the headphone piece wrapping around your head is much lighter and slimmer.

The Aftershokz Trekz Air version is also about 20% lighter. The final difference is the microphone quality is better for phone calls. I don’t call people while working out (I’m not that coordinated) but several people do.  If that is something that interests you, the Trekz Air might be a better option.

Aftershokz is an excellent product and even better company, possibly why they’ve exploded on social media and in running specialty.

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. There are often giveaways as well as discount codes.

Questions for you:

What kind of headphones do you use?

Do you use music when you run?

Training: Swimming and 10 Milers

Training: Swimming and 10 Milers

I thought I would increase mileage this week, but that didn’t quite happen with running. It did with swimming! Anyway, after Atlantic City, I took a week off from running.  It was good for me, and I’ve started getting back into swimming.

Week 1: 2 miles

Week 2: Training: Swimming and Running

Week 3: <Here>

Monday: Run 60 minutes/Swim 2000 meters
Tuesday: Run 60 minutes/Swim 2000 meters
Wednesday: Swim 3000 meters
Thursday: Run 60 minutes
Friday: Rest
Saturday: Run 60 minutes
Sunday: Broad Street 10 Miler (1:07.35)

Thoughts:

This is the most out of shape I’ve been for Broad Street in a few years, and that’s okay. I’m happy to run.  Moving into the summer, I plan to race much more frequently. I’m still going to swim, and my weekly mileage might be lower, but the cross training has been a nice change of pace.  There isn’t much to say about running this week, just that I did it and it was easy.

Swimming:

My first two swims were 2000 meters of straight swimming. On Wednesday, I decided to swim 2X1500 (28:22, 28:21), just to increase mileage and I felt decent.

 

Broad Street 10 Miler: 1:07.35

This was my slowest Broad Street in the five years I’ve run, but I was happy to run. It was pouring rain, and I’ve been the least trained I’ve ever been going into the race. Usually Broad Street happens at the end of a training cycle. I’ve run between 1:01-1:05 in all weather conditions. This time it happened after a low mileage a few weeks and time off. It was pouring rain the entire race, but I had an enjoyable time. My splits were between 6:40-6:55 the entire time and I probably could have kept that pace and run a 1:28ish half marathon which is motivating because it’s slightly faster than what I’ve been running.

Posts from the Week:

April Training

Altra Escalante 1.5 Shoe Review

Finally, have you subscribed to the LOLZletter? It’s a free newsletter that comes out each Monday. In the newsletter, I share running industry trends and things relevant to the sport. There are often giveaways as well as discount codes.

Questions for you:

Are you training for anything?

What was your best workout last week?

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