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Brooks Glycerin 15 Shoe Review

Brooks Glycerin 15 Shoe Review

For the past year, the Brooks Glycerin has been one of my personal favorite shoes.  I ran in the Brooks Glycerin 14 and am currently running in the Glycerin 15. Spoiler: The Brooks Glycerin is 15 is just as good, if not better, than the Brooks Glycerin 14.

A common question I recieve both at work and on this blog, is do you like the Brooks Glycerin or Brooks Ghost better?

Brook glycerin 15 shoe review

My answer is: I wish I could take the fit of the Brooks Ghost (it’s wider) and have the cushion the Glycerin.  Both have their positives and negatives and I like both shoes about the same.

In short, the Glycerin is the most cushioned shoe from Brooks.  Whether you are running 100 miles or walking 1, it’s going to provide a soft and well cushioned ride.

Brooks is not paying me to review their shoes and I’m not a Brooks ambassador.

Fit:

One major update from the Brooks Glycerin 14 to the Glycerin 15 is the redesigned upper.  There are less seams and it is a bit wider.  Without the seams, the Glycerin fits many more people with bunions or people that have fuller toe boxes (like myself). The wider toebox update is welcomed from the Glyercin 14.

Brook glycerin 15 shoe review

The redesigned upper is positive and you’ll have a lot more room for your toes to spread out.   Fit wise, I wore a 10 wide in the Brooks Glycerin 14 and I still wear a 10 wide in the Brooks Glycerin 15.  My feet have much more room and they are happier.

Ride:

The ride of the actual shoe is very similar to the previous model.  To me, it feels almost identical in a good way.  You don’t have to worry “the shoe update has changed” and it won’t work for you.  It still has a very high cushioned and soft feel.

The Glycerin Line Itself: If you’ve never worn the Glycerin, it’s a very high cushioned, soft, shoe.  There is a lot of cushioning throughout the shoe but it’s not heavy or bulky either.  A major reason I like it, is the amount of forefront cushioning.

me running brooks glycerin 15

Brooks Glycerin 15 Conclusions

The Glycerin 15 is a solid update from the Glycerin 14.  There isn’t anything too crazy changed, so you won’t feel as though it’s a brand new shoe.  Let’s be honest, minimal changes in the running shoe world are a good thing.  With the amount of cushion, it’s a personal favorite of mine.

Current Rotation:
Brooks Ghost 10
Hoka Bondi 5
Saucony Freedom
Brooks Glycerin 15

Questions for you:

Have you run in the Brooks Glycerin?

What is your favorite running shoe?

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How to Prepare for Running in the Heat

How to Prepare for Running in the Heat

Incase you weren’t aware, it’s finally getting warmer.  Although, if you are anything like the Northeast, our weather went from 30 degrees to 80.  It feels as though there wasn’t much middle ground!  Hopefully, your body adjusts faster than mine.

Thinking out loud, running in the heat can be a challenge.  Even though it’s usually more enjoyable than running in the cold, there are a lot of difficulties and obstacles you face by running in the warm weather too.

So How can you Prepare for Spring and Summer Running this Year?

Stay Hydrated

This is probably the most important advice!

It doesn’t mean drink a liter of water directly before your run.  It means staying hydrating throughout the day.

Drink more water before, after and during your run.  Also don’t forget that you also lose electryltes while running in warmer conditions.  During the warmer months, it’s important to add salt tabs or Gatorade to the mix too.  Every runner has their own personal preferance of what works for the stomach and system.  I am fortanate that most any electrolyte drink works well for me, I just need to remember to drink it.

Adjust your Run for the Temperature and Humidity

Don’t be ashamed to back off pacing or dial it back because it’s hot.  Run by effort and feel, not based on what the workout pace should be at ideal conditions.

For example, on Sunday, I had a tempo run scheduled.  It was 85 degrees and while my pace was “supposed” to be 6:45, I ran 7:18 and was struggling.  Was I upset?  No!  Was I injured?  No.  I adjusted my pace accordingly and ran by effort.   It’s important to take note that running in the heat effects your body and you won’t hit the same paces as running in ideal conditions.

Wear Appropriate Clothing:

You could run naked but that would end up being sunburnt and uncomfortable.  Don’t forget to wear sunscreen as well as moisture wicking clothing.  I’ll have to do a current post of running clothing I’m loving this season but in the mean time here are some things not to forget:

  • Hat (to keep sun off your face)
  • Moisture wicking and noncotton clothing: including a top, sports bra, shorts, underwear and socks.  Cotton anything will absorb sweat and become heaving causing blisters, chafing and who knows what else.
  • Sunglasses: To keep your eyes protected
  • Body glide and sunscreen (because chafing stinks)
Be Flexible with Your Schedule:

Whether you need to run inside or run early, don’t be afraid to change your plan.  Run at the best time of the day.

You aren’t a hero if you run in 100-degree heat at high noon!   In the winter, typically running at lunch time is ideal but that isn’t usually the case over the summer.  That’s normally when it’s the hottest.  Don’t be afraid to change the time of day you run or where you run.

There is no shame in running on the treadmill, especially when it’s the safest option.  You can usually find me there at least once per week.
In case you missed any of the previous weeks Running Store and Training:
Thoughts While Working in the Running Store
Should Race in Racing Flats?
Are you Getting Enough Protein for Running?
Why 5ks are the Best
How Alternating Shoes Can Benefit Your Running:
How to Transition in Minimalist Running Shoes
Should You Wear Running Shoes Outside of Running?
Questions for you:
What are some tips you have for running in the heat?
Do you like summer or winter running better? 

Brooks Glycerin 14 Shoe Review

Brooks Glycerin 14 Shoe Review

The Brooks Glycerin 14 is the most cushioned neutral shoe that Brooks currently offers.  I’ve reviewed both the Brooks Ghost 9 as well as the Brooks Launch 3 and Brooks Launch 4.

As most people have noticed, lately I’ve been doing most of my training in Brooks.  I’m not paid or an ambassador.  Recently, I have found the fit of Brooks to match my foot well.

A while ago, I ran a minimal amount in the Brooks Glycerin 12, and I liked them.   For no reason, I just haven’t run in them since.  I’ve wanted to try the Glycerin again but for whatever reason, haven’t.

The Brooks Glycerin 14 is similar to the 13.  The majority of the update came with the fit of the upper, and it fits wider than the previous model.

Fit:

The upper is seamless which means it’s able to fit wider feet as well as it doesn’t press against bunions.  A lot of running shoes are going towards seamless uppers.  Being seamless, allows for an overall more comfortable fit.

A smooth mesh allows for a “socklike” fit with plenty of breathing room.  Compared to the Glycerin 13 upper, the mesh feels more durable too.

Speaking of the mesh, something unique about the Glycerin is the mesh is much thinner. I have found it to dry much quicker than many other shoes.  Considering most of March was pouring rain in New Jersey this was extremely helpful.

Typically I wear a size 10 or 10 wide in running shoes and have found the 10 wide to be the best fit.

Brooks glycerin 14 shoe review

Ride:

The Glycerin has a lot more cushion than the Ghost.  You can feel the cushion under your feet, and it feels like a sponge.  Brookes uses cushioning technology similar to memory foam.  The Brooks Glycerin is definitely the softest traditional shoes I’ve run in for a while.  You feel the extra cushion without the extra weight.

Thoughts:

The Glycerin has been a shoe I’ve wanted to try for a while, and I was pleased to finally give it a shot.  I like the shoe a lot, and I’ll probably keep it in my rotation for a while.  I don’t have any complaints and the Brooks Glycerin 15 comes out soon so I’ll add that into my rotation too.

Pros:

  • High Cushion and Soft
  • Seamless Upper
  • Updating soon so will be on sale

Cons:

  • Price ($150)
  • More narrow than many other Brooks Shoes
  • Brooks glycerin 14 shoe review

My Current Running Shoe Rotation:
Brooks Glycerin
Brooks Launch 4 (short runs, workouts)
Saucony Freedom (daily runs)
Hoka Bondi 5 (daily runs, recovery runs)
Saucony Type A (speed work)

Questions for you:
What are your favorite shoes right now?
Do you prefer more or less cushion when it comes to running shoes?

Training: Off Weeks

Training: Off Weeks

Last week’s training didn’t go as anticipated.  Most of the Northeast got a huge heat wave, and while I’m thankful for it, my body didn’t adjust well.  Plus around Thursday-Friday, I started to feel somewhat sick.  Essentially last week, running was put on the backburner.  I had time to run, but I didn’t make it my priority.  I managed to run most days but quality miles? Eh, I’m not so sure about.

Monday: Easy Run
Tuesday: 1 hour Easy Run
Wednesday: Workout
Thursday: Rest
Friday: 1 hour Easy Run
Saturday: 1 hour easy Easy Run
Sunday: 45 minutes tempo (7:30)
Total:  60 miles

Wednesday’s Workout:
1X25 minutes (goal 6:46…actual 7:15)
2X2 miles (goal 6:23…actual 6:55)
2X3 minutes (goal 5:53…actual 6:58)

This workout didn’t go well. I’m not sure whether it was my body or the fact that I was probably at the early stages of a stomach bug but no part that felt good minus I was injury free.  I left the workout feeling bummed and disappointed with myself.  After throwing a pity party for a few minutes, I put the workout in my rearview mirror and focused on another day.  It stinks to be so far off an interval but sometimes that is life.  Lately, I’ve had more of those workouts lately than I care too.

Due to the weather on Sunday, I changed my tempo pace.  It was 85 degrees when I started, and I still wasn’t feeling great.  Even though it was extremely far off of any true tempo pace, I made it through the workout.  The first workout in heat always wipes me out and spent the rest of the afternoon watching Netflix and rehydrating.

Thoughts:
Obviously, this wasn’t a finer workout week for me.  As someone who blogs primarily about running,  it can be daunting to write a post about having a bad week…but it happens.  Every runner, elite, midpacker or beginner has bad weeks of workouts.  The most important part is I’m injury free and just trying to chug along.

Next week is the April Fools (Atlantic City) Half Marathon.  Originally, this was my goal race of the year.  I know the course well and have typically ran well there.  As time gets closer, I don’t feel as though I’m in the same shape as when I’ve set PRs here and my times in the last few months reflect that.  I’ve been bouncing around with several 1:27 half marathons and an outlier 1:23 half in Dallas.  This week is all about recovery, and regardless it will be nice to run one of my favorite races.

Finally, good luck to everyone running and racing Boston!

Posts of the week:
Should You Wear Running Shoes Outside of Running?
Clean Air 5kish (19:50)

Questions for you:
How do you mentally bounce back from a workout?
Did you watch Boston?

Guest Post: Mr. LOLZ Mercedes Marathon (2:59.45)

As most people know, my husband ran his first marathon last weekend.  For his first blog post, he decided to share his recap of the race.  Enjoy!

Hollie


As people know, Hollie and I lived in Alabama for about 6 weeks due to my work.  Going into the marathon, I was finishing a six-week course for the Air Force. While I had time to train, running wasn’t my main focus.  In fact, I hadn’t committed to the marathon until we finished the preview run just two weeks prior.    I finished 20 that day.  I knew I could finish a marathon, but I wanted to finish it under 3 hours.  I heard the Mercedes marathon was a good full and it fell on the end of my course so I thought it would be a good idea to do.

The night before, we had Mellow Mushroom pizza which is Hollie and I’s favorite restaurant. I’m lactose intolerant, so I don’t get cheese but garlic and oil based. I like to feel full but not overwhelmed. We went to bed at 8 pm and were up at 4:15 am. I had coffee and a bagel for breakfast.  We walked to the start after Hollie needed to go to the car twice in the morning for random things including running shoes. I guess she is not into barefoot running.

I don’t like big races and would rather do a small 100 person one.  The bathroom situation and start line are always crazy. Once we got to the start, I was faced with a 30 min bathroom line, but I discovered bathrooms on the third floor which had zero line. We got to the start about 10 mins before and chatted with Miles, and exchanged race strategies. My goal was to go out in a 7 min pace and pick it up to break 3 hours. I was told this was a bad strategy given the heat conditions and it was my first marathon.

Since the half and full marathon started together, I started next to my wife. As they did the countdown for the start, my wife was dancing to rap music. I don’t understand why they play rap music at starts but it’s another reason I don’t like big races.  Unlike Hollie who talks to everyone she knows and dances at the start line, I like to stay focused.

The race went off with a literal “go go go”. I started off as expected. It was rush of people as expected. I told myself to chill and relax. I came through the first mile in 6:40.

I was already getting hot and anticipated I might need to delayer to my top.  Between mile 1-2, I moved my race bib from my shirt to my shorts because it impeded air flow. I don’t know how I didn’t fall.

The next few miles clicked along, and between miles 2-8, I kept an even pace between 6:50-7. I run with a stopwatch with no GPS, so I went based in mile markers. My goal to the halfway was to remain relaxed and not to pick it up. The heat wasn’t affecting me as much as I anticipated but I also ran a half marathon while deployed in 90 degrees (literally 90 degrees).

At mile 10, many half marathoners passed me doing their finishing kick. They pulled me along, and I caught up with one kid whose goal was to break 90 minutes in the half. I hit the halfway point in 1:30.40 which was exactly what I planned. Even though that was “the plan,” I was worried because it was slower than 3-hour pace and my hamstring was tight.

The marathon course is a double loop of the half, and we started back around for round 2. Excitingly enough, we ran the exact same course twice. I looked up at the first hill and saw two runners about 2 mins ahead and thought they were probably at the 3-hour pace. I caught them about 3 miles later. I ran between 6:20-6:40 for the next few miles based on hills.

Around miles 16-18, I slowed down for the next few miles because I was nervous to hit the infamous wall marathoners talk about. I kept an easier pace going up hills and passed a few more people.  I had begun to pass a lot of people.  That’s motivating in any race.

Personally, I never felt as though I hit the wall. Around mile 20, we hit the downhill with a minor headwind.

Once I got to mile 23, I did the math and realized to break 3 I would have to run 7-minute pace exactly. The next three miles I ran in 7:03, and when I got to mile 26, I knew it was extremely close, and I had to go. I would regret running above 3 hours.  My half marathon PR is 1:20.02 so I didn’t want to do that again.

When I rounded the last turn, I could see the finish line reading 2:59. I picked it up and ran as hard as possible and finished in 2:59.45.  I guess I ran by my wife screaming but I didn’t notice because I was staring at the finish.

After I crossed the line, I felt my legs cramping and kept walking. I chugged a Powerade and ate half of the Orange supply.

tim-and-i-1

I know I’ll a do another marathon at some point when my schedule allows me to train.  I had a good experience with the marathon and while I prefer it over the half marathon, I still like 5-10ks better.

Hollie told me to ask some questions at the bottom so:

What do you remember about your first marathon?

Do you like to stay focused at the start line or are you relaxed and talkative? 

Training: First 20 Miler in 18+ Months

As I mentioned in my training log last week, I am still entertaining the idea of a marathon.  So last week set out with personal friend Angela, we ran 20 miles.  It wasn’t pretty, fast or even that fun (minus running with her) but we did get it done.  More on that later…

Monday: Rest
Tuesday: 20 miles with Angela
Wednesday: Rest ART/PT
Thursday: Easy 30 minutes
Friday: 6 miles with Montana Core/ART/PT
Saturday: Easy 30 minutes
Sunday: 30 minute tempo run  Core

Thoughts:

I was lucky to find someone to be able to run the entire twenty miles with because honestly, I’m not sure I would have been able to run the mileage by myself.  I never felt awful during the run but it didn’t feel good either.  Not feeling amazing is to be expected considering I haven’t run that far since the Phoenix Marathon.

I finished the 20 miles, and it honestly took me all week to recover even with extra rest and ART sessions.  I still don’t feel perfect, but I do feel a lot better.  Have I made up my mind about the marathon?  Not really…I wish I could say running 20 miles motivated me to run a marathon, but it didn’t.  I don’t feel like I could confidently finish 26.2 miles right now.

Angela and I

The majority of the week was spent recovering, shakeout runs and easy runs.  I was able to run with a friend too.  I took the weekend off from racing as well.  I did a tempo run on Sunday, but it was pouring rain and windy.  I was running about a 7-minute pace, but the effort felt much faster.  As I’ve learned this year, you can’t choose the weather on race day…and you can’t on workout days either.

In summary, except a 20 miler, it was a down, boring and easy week.  I guess when a single run makes up most of your running, it’s not as boring.

But after your longest run in 18 months, you shouldn’t be running too much.  I’m running the Runner’s World Festival next weekend (the 5k and 13.1 miles).  (If you are local and want to run, I have a 10% discount code of FueledbyLOLZblog). So before then I’ll continue to rest and see where running goes.

So before the race weekend, I’ll continue to rest and see where running goes.

Questions for you:

Do you recover well from long runs?

Is anyone else doing Runners World?

The Great Hat Debate of the Men’s Marathon

If you watched the Men’s Olympic Marathon, then you noticed the amount of talking about hats.  Most athletes that ran had at least one statement commentating on their hat.  The commentators of the Olympics is a post for another day, though…

mens marathon

image via IAAF

On the US side, Rupp, as well as Meb, changed hats and most competitors ultimately took off their caps.  Ward stayed hatless the entire race.

Why were the commentators so obsessed with the racers hats? 

Thinking out loud, I decided to take an in-depth look at the hat situation and see how it affected the athletes and their placing.  Because why not? If the world’s “best” marathon commentators allowed to comment on hats…why can’t I.

If you followed me on twitter, you know after five minutes of listening to #hatchat by the commentators, I jumped on board with #hatchat too.

Actual comment from the commentator:

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To clarify, Salzar later said the hats were filled with ice to keep the racers cooled.  Is that an unfair advantage?  I don’t know.

Any runner was welcome to have multiple hats but how many runners thought of that?  Are water stations going to eventually become aid stops?  Will you be able to stop, check your cell phone and play Pokemon Go at a water station?  Who knows how the marathon rules will progress…That being said, none of the athletes were breaking any rules by exchanging hats.

Let’s look at the three medalists: Kipchogue (gold), Lilesa (silver), and Rupp (bronze).   We can see both one and three started with hats but by the end of the race, neither had their original hat.  Several athletes exchanged hats during the course, however, Rupp was the only to medal.

At the beginning of the race and through about mile 10, it looks like several racers have white hats.  Only one lone athlete dared to wear blue, and he made it in the lead pack until around mile 20.

Let’s look at the various types of hats athletes used:

The overall winner began his race with more of a ball cap.  It had a flatter rim.

Both Rupp and Meb (possibly other athletes too), used various hats.  Each of their hats was filled with ice to keep them cool.

Early Stages of Race:

Lead pack of 35ish men:

  • About half wearing standard hats
  • One blue hat
  • One bandana/headband combo
  • A few visors but it seems more like a female racing strategy (I am a visor woman myself)
Mid-Race: 10-15 men
  • Half of the racers are wearing standard hats
  • One blue hat
  • One bandana/headband combo
  • No visors remain
//platform.twitter.com/widgets.jsLead pack of 7
  • Leader maintains hat
  • Rupp is on hat 4 (?)
  • Blue hat begins to fade
  • Three hats left
Lead Pack of 4:
  • Leader has dropped his hat
  • Rupp remains the only hatted athlete
  • Pace starts to drop
Final Few Miles:
    • No athletes have hats and pace quickens
    • The hat debate is over

So my questioning begins…Do hats make you race quicker?  Does throwing your hat off mean you are about to drop the pace?The most important question, however, is: How can Hats Help the Nonelite Runner?

I’m no professional but can a hat (or 10 hats throughout a race) help a common runner like me?

Here I am running in a visor (which I kept and have run many races and training runs in).

Here I am running in a visor (which I kept and have run many races and training runs in).

Hats can keep the sun or rain out of your eyes and can keep you cooler.  If you can find a hat that you like running in, there aren’t any real disadvantages.

Conclusion:

Will I wear a hat in my next marathon?  I will probably wear a visor if it’s sunny or rainy.  I like the sun out of my face as well as the rain.  I won’t have the luxury to exchange hats midrace but I’ll still use the one I’ve come to know and love.

Questions for you?
Hats or no hats?
Do you think the hat exchanges were fair? 

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