Hiking Los Robles Trail and Open Space

Hiking Los Robles Trail and Open Space

It feels like this was forever ago.  While in California, we hiked five different locations between 2-9 miles.  Nothing was overly strenuous but each was fun and challenging in its own way.

Los Robles Trail and Open Space is located at the southern portion of the Conejo Open Space.  It’s located near the highway, and you would never guess there are over 200 acres in the park.

We were traveling north from Carlsbad to San Francisco and wanted to get out and stretch your legs.  When I googled short hikes, I found the Los Robles Trail and Open Space. One commenter wrote: “perfect for when you’re stuck in traffic and want to get out of the car for a short walk.”

What I didn’t realize until later was the trail’s historical significance!  On Feb. 28, 1776, Juan Bautiste de Anza and nearly 200 settlers came through the Conejo Valley on a similar trail while traveling from Mexico to San Francisco.

While we were out, we saw several other hikers as well as plenty of mountain bikers too. Hiking Los Robles Trail CA

The Open Space

Hiking Los Robles Trail CA

Lots of mountain bike trails too

Hiking Los Robles Trail CA

A very old tree

Hiking Los Robles Trail CA

Views

Hiking Los Robles Trail CA

The end of the trail to a neighborhood

Hiking Los Robles Trail CA

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Trying to catch a sunset and eating hair. Typical.

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You Can See More Hikes here.

California Hikes:

Hiking Marin Headlands (San Francisco)

Hiking Calavera Hills Community Park

Mini Trip to Los Angeles

Questions for you:

Are you good at road trips? Can you drive for a long period of time without stopping? (not me LOL)

Where is your favorite spot to hike? 

Hiking Marin Headlands (San Francisco)

Hiking Marin Headlands (San Francisco)

Just north over the Golden Gate Bridge, are the Marin Headlands. My husband and I were looking for a longer and scenic hike, and so we chose to go up there. We visited during the government shutdown, which meant all of the bathrooms and buildings were closed, but you could still hike or run.  There are a bunch of hikes in Marin Headlands, as well as mountain bike trails, equestrians, and if you are bold enough, you can run the trail.

We decided to hike the perimeter. It’s an easy, wide trail, with the challenge being the elevation changes (about 1600 feet total).  While we saw people, it was never busy, or crowded.

This is about what we did: Lagoon Trail → Miwok Trail → Wolf Ridge Trail → Coastal Trail to Rodeo Beach.

The loop itself is 7.8 miles, but near the peak, you can walk to the peak which is just over .5.  It’s well worth the view and I would recommend it.

 

Marin Headlands San Francisco

The start:

Marin Headlands San Francisco

Marin Headlands San Francisco

We found a well en route

Marin Headlands San Francisco

You cant tell, but the incline is steep!

Marin Headlands San Francisco

We added about .5, to see the very top. This area is used for flying and the giant building in the middle is called a “VORTAC”.  Pilots can gauge where exactly they are in the air via these areas. It can be used in inclement weather when the aircraft is being flown solely from instruments (meaning the pilot is using modern technology to navigate).  You can read more about that here.

Marin Headlands San Francisco

Marin Headlands San Francisco

Eating a cookie at the top

Marin Headlands San Francisco

Marin Headlands San Francisco

Marin Headlands San Francisco

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If you hike 4 hours without cell service…did you even go?

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In all, it was one of my favorite hikes of the trip. It was a beautiful open trail.  The terrain is not difficult, but the elevation and climbing are.

Other California Hikes:

Mini Trip to Los Angeles

Hiking Calavera Hills Community Park

You Can See All Hikes Here.

Questions for you:

East Coast rocky trails or West Coast smooth but more climbing trails…which do you prefer?

 

Walking the Manasquan Reservoir

Walking the Manasquan Reservoir

Recently I was at the Manasquan Reservoir.  Even with the number of times I tried to spell it writing the post, I’ve struggled!

Anyway, the perimeter loop is 5 miles and it’s an, scenic, flat loop. You can run or walk, whatever you’re feeling like.  It took me about 2 hours to walk, but I was taking my time and seeing what I saw.  It would be a fairly nice loop to run or even do a workout on.  Why didn’t I run? I was catching up with a couple of people and it was a cross training day. I would come back and run.

It’s definitely an easy hike or walk but there is always a view along the way.  Plus, I saw people riding horses which I haven’t seen in a while. I parked near the boat ramp and just walked around that way.

The Manasquan Reservoir Park has about 1,200 acres which include the reservoir itself plus the surrounding forests and wetlands. While it was cold when we were out, you can definitely boat or fish at the reservoir too.

manasquan reservoir perimeter trail

It’s well marked with plenty of signs. It’s next to impossible to get lost (believe me, if there is a way to get lost, I will)

manasquan reservoir perimeter trail

A few bridges in the beginning

manasquan reservoir perimeter trail

manasquan reservoir perimeter trail

The water wasn’t frozen over but the tree branches had their fair share of icicles.

manasquan reservoir perimeter trail

Much of the path is easy, crushed, gravel

manasquan reservoir perimeter trail

A pack of deer literally right next to me. They were tame and didn’t care…

manasquan reservoir perimeter trail

manasquan reservoir perimeter trail

manasquan reservoir perimeter trail

The final section goes by the road. It’s not more than 1/2 mile though.

manasquan reservoir perimeter trail

In all, it was a beautiful but cold adventure. I like the Manasquan reservoir and I definitely want to come back and run.

You Can See All NJ Hikes Here.

2019 Winter Hikes I’ve Done:

Hiking to the Headley Overlook at Mahlon Dickerson

Questions for you:

What is your favorite season to hike?

Have you ever come close to a deer? 

Hiking to the Headley Overlook at Mahlon Dickerson

Hiking to the Headley Overlook at Mahlon Dickerson

I haven’t had a lot of time to hike lately and I’ve missed it.  Truthfully between running and hiking, there are times I just appreciate hiking. Not trail running but just hiking and tooling around in on trails for a few hours. I’ve wanted to get to the Headley Overlook for a while.

Headley Overlook is located in Mahlon Dickerson Park in northwest NJ.  The park itself has about 10 miles of hiking or running depending on your mood. I went the day after a few days of rain, so the park was wetter than normal but still moderately easy to get through.

Hiking to the Headley Overlook at Mahlon Dickerson

The Headley Overlook looks over Lake Hopatcong and then follows a pass by the highest point in Morris County (1395′).

Then you return down an old flat rail bed.  You can hike anywhere between 1-10 miles because of all of the trail systems. We set out to stay around 3 hours. It ended up being somewhere between 5-7 miles.

Hiking to the Headley Overlook at Mahlon Dickerson

We parked at the beautiful and peaceful Saffin Pond. We started on the teal diamond which was rocky and a little wet due to rain.

Hiking to the Headley Overlook at Mahlon Dickerson

Nothing too strenuous and I used my Under Armour Gore Trail shoes with no issues.  Slowly I started climbing over the course of a mile and arrived to the Headley Overlook around 2.5 miles. The view is wonderful and you can see Lake Hopatcong in the distance.

Around 4 miles, I reached the highest point in Morris County. It’s not the highest spot in NJ, but up there.

highest point morris county me

From there, we hiked back to the car which was another hour or so. We explored the old rail beds.  It was the lowest, and the wettest area from all of the rain.

Hiking to the Headley Overlook at Mahlon Dickerson

Hiking to the Headley Overlook at Mahlon Dickerson

In all, it was a peaceful hike. The entire park has about 10 miles of trails which are doable for most, especially the rail bed (which is almost completely flat).

You can see all hikes here. 

Questions for you:

What is your favorite hiking spot?

What is your favorite season to hike?

I thought mine was summer, but truthfully, I enjoy the lack of bugs and people during this time of the year.

Exploring Wells State Park (Sturbridge, MA)

Exploring Wells State Park (Sturbridge, MA)

It looks like Wells State Park is my last post for summer hiking. This summer, I was lucky enough to have time to hike in several spots in the Northeast.  Heck, I even did a couple of mountain races too.  I genuinely enjoy hiking as much as running.

Anyway, on my way back from the Boothbay Half, my husband and I stopped around Sturbridge.  Instead of running, we opted for a 4-5 mile hike in Wells State Park.  Wells State Park is neat because there is plenty of camping.  We were out early, and we saw lots of other hikers and campers.  It was never overwhelming, and it wasn’t as if the trails went right through campsites.  If I lived in the area, this would be a place I would camp.

Wells State Park is about 1,400-acres. Apparently, there are the campground has 60  sites. We primarily hiked around Walker Pond which appears you can fish or swim depending on the location.

There are over 10 miles of trails which are for hiking.  There is also a road that goes through the park for campers to easier setup sites.

Here are a few photos:

Wells State Park Sturbridge MA hiking

Around Walker Pond

Wells State Park Sturbridge MA hiking

Dirt Path

 

 

Wells State Park Sturbridge MA hiking

More Hiking

Wells State Park Sturbridge MA hiking

Wells State Park Sturbridge MA hiking

Do you see the frog?  I didn’t until my husband pointed him out.

Wells State Park Sturbridge MA hiking

Wells State Park Sturbridge MA hiking

In all, we had a great time, and if I’m ever back in the area, I will go back.  The trail itself is easy, and doable for kids or dogs.

Here are other hikes I’ve done this Spring and Summer:

Hiking Turkey Swamp in Freehold
Exploring Cattus Island in Toms River
Exploring Hartshorne Park in the Highlands
Hiking to the Cape May Lighthouse
Hiking Bear Mountain in a Downpour
Hiking through Belleplain State Forest
Hiking High Mountain with a View of NYC
Walk Out a Mile and It Down Pours
Hiking Shark River Park

You can see all hikes here.

Questions for you:

Do you like camping? I haven’t been in a while, but I don’t mind. 

What is something fun you did this summer? 

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